1. dmls13's Avatar
    Hi everyone,

    I'm currently using an iPhone 4 that I bought mid-2010 shortly after it was released, then running iOS 4.0. Four years later, it received its last update to 7.1.2. Not only because of that, but mainly because it has become rather slow, it's about time for a new phone for me.

    And this time around, I'd like to try an Android device. But from what I've heard from friends and co-workers, these phones rarely seem to get more than one OS update; some didn't get any major updates at all. That would suck, because I would like to stick to that device for a few years again.

    So, I'm looking for an Android phone that is likely to get updates continuously, and has the power reserves to make use of these coming updates.

    Before you say "Nexus 6": that thing is way too big for my taste ;-) I was thinking more along the lines of a Sony Z3 compact. But will Sony keep providing updates?

    I got my hopes up when I read about the Motorola Droid Turbo, but sadly we don't get that in Germany for some reason.

    So, any recommendations? Thanks in advance! :-)
    03-04-2015 10:55 AM
  2. Ry's Avatar
    Hi everyone,

    I'm currently using an iPhone 4 that I bought mid-2010 shortly after it was released, then running iOS 4.0. Four years later, it received its last update to 7.1.2. Not only because of that, but mainly because it has become rather slow, it's about time for a new phone for me.

    And this time around, I'd like to try an Android device. But from what I've heard from friends and co-workers, these phones rarely seem to get more than one OS update; some didn't get any major updates at all. That would suck, because I would like to stick to that device for a few years again.

    So, I'm looking for an Android phone that is likely to get updates continuously, and has the power reserves to make use of these coming updates.

    Before you say "Nexus 6": that thing is way too big for my taste ;-) I was thinking more along the lines of a Sony Z3 compact. But will Sony keep providing updates?

    I got my hopes up when I read about the Motorola Droid Turbo, but sadly we don't get that in Germany for some reason.

    So, any recommendations? Thanks in advance! :-)
    You don't get the Motorola DROID Turbo because it's a Verizon exclusive.

    I'm not sure if Motorola plans to release it's international variant, the Moto Maxx, in Germany.

    Before you say no to the Nexus 6, know that the Nexus line is the most supported when it comes to Android updates.

    People say that after the Nexus, Motorola's recent lineup gets updates the fastest so a Moto X (second generation) could be your next best bet outside of the older Nexus 5.
  3. Ry's Avatar
    Hi everyone,

    I'm currently using an iPhone 4 that I bought mid-2010 shortly after it was released, then running iOS 4.0. Four years later, it received its last update to 7.1.2. Not only because of that, but mainly because it has become rather slow, it's about time for a new phone for me.

    And this time around, I'd like to try an Android device. But from what I've heard from friends and co-workers, these phones rarely seem to get more than one OS update; some didn't get any major updates at all. That would suck, because I would like to stick to that device for a few years again.

    So, I'm looking for an Android phone that is likely to get updates continuously, and has the power reserves to make use of these coming updates.

    Before you say "Nexus 6": that thing is way too big for my taste ;-) I was thinking more along the lines of a Sony Z3 compact. But will Sony keep providing updates?

    I got my hopes up when I read about the Motorola Droid Turbo, but sadly we don't get that in Germany for some reason.

    So, any recommendations? Thanks in advance! :-)
    You don't get the Motorola DROID Turbo because it's a Verizon exclusive.

    I'm not sure if Motorola plans to release it's international variant, the Moto Maxx, in Germany.

    Before you say no to the Nexus 6, know that the Nexus line is the most supported when it comes to Android updates.

    People say that after the Nexus, Motorola's recent lineup gets updates the fastest so a Moto X (second generation) could be your next best bet outside of the older Nexus 5.
    03-04-2015 11:01 AM
  4. Rukbat's Avatar
    About the only way to make sure that you'll get updates for more versions with an Android phone is to get one that CyanogenMod supports. They will probably keep supporting that phone until it becomes too old to use. (It's an independent ROM, but closely follows the Android ROM of the same version [but not the same name - Android 5 is CyanogenMod 12].)

    The manufacturers generally update flagship phones twice and others once. (How fast you get the update shouldn't matter - for instance, the first people who got the 5,0 LolliFlop update still wish they hadn't. 5.0.1 was a bug fix. 5.0.2 was a bug fix for that. And I've heard of a 5.1, which will probably be a bug fix for that.)

    Apple works differently. It controls both th hardware and the software directly, so any iOS update will work on almost all still-usable iPhones. (As you say the 4 is getting a bit slow for current apps. In another version or two of iOS, it'll be too slow to use, and they'll probably stop wporrying about compatibility with the 4 - although it'll probably work for another version or two after that.

    Also, Apple doesn't announce that they're coming out with a new version until it's been written, alpha tested, beta tested, debugged, beta tested again, etc., for a few times, and it's as ready as any software will ever be. Then they announce a "release date" of next week. Which they can meet, of course - they could release it this week.

    With Android, Google (Marketing, probably - Engineering knows that it's not a working product until it's finished) announces a new version (the next one will start with an M and be 6.0) long before it's even ready to test in the lab. Many months later it's ready to be put into the current Nexus phone. It's still full of bugs, but Marketing announced a release dayt long before Engineering knew when it would even be ready for testing.

    Once it's soak tested, it's released and the bugs begin to appear.

    Then each manufacturer has to modify it for each model it's going to release it for. Once they're satisfied that it's "ready" (remember, they started with bugs built in, so it's still has those bugs - all they did was make it work on their device), it goes to the carriers so they can put their modifications and bloatware into the ROM. (Apple completely skips that step - you don't want to sell phones without your bloatware, don't sell iPhones - so the carriers have no choice. If HTC or even Samsung said that, they'd be out of the cellphone business in a flash.)

    So Android updates take longer from first announcement until your carrier releases the update for your model handset. Apple announces a new release after it's ready to go, and it's one version for all iPhones.

    I'd rather be a version behind with a working phone, than get the latest version the minute Google sends out the first copy - and have nothing but problems for months. But you can't do as much with an iPhone as you can with an Android. So you have to pick which side of the balance you're on - few and late updates or a phone that you can jailbreak and install apps on, and just about nothing else.
    anon8380037 likes this.
    03-04-2015 01:10 PM
  5. dmls13's Avatar
    The Moto Maxx won't be available in Europe either, according to Motorola. Which is a shame, that thing looks pretty sweet.
    03-05-2015 02:03 AM
  6. dmls13's Avatar
    Rukbat: Wow, your answer doesn't sound like a recommendation for a switch to Android ...

    I agree you don't always need the latest version of everything. But when security flaws like the one in 4.3's web view aren't getting patches, I would rather upgrade to a version that doesn't have this problem. I know several people that bought a not-too-cheap Android phone recently and won't be getting an upgrade from 4.3, so they'll be stuck with that flaw. I think that sucks, and that was the reason for my question here.

    I want a device that I won't have to replace in just two years time, despite of its hardware working just fine for me, just because the manufacturer doesn't care to support it any longer. Do I really have to stick to Apple to get that? iOS is beginning to feel a bit stale to me, I was kinda looking forward to a change.
    03-05-2015 02:20 AM
  7. Ry's Avatar
    I'd only use Cyanogen's OS on a daily driver if it was meant to ship with it.
    03-05-2015 02:40 PM
  8. LeoRex's Avatar
    Before you say "Nexus 6": that thing is way too big for my taste ;-) I was thinking more along the lines of a Sony Z3 compact. But will Sony keep providing updates?
    Then I'll say Nexus 5.

    Nexus devices will have the longest 'official' support and also the longest 'unofficial' support as they are most often reference devices for custom ROM developers. The Nexus 4, released in Nov of 2012 and received the latest Android factory images along with its newer siblings the 5 and 6. Yes, it is due to be EOL'd soon, but two years removed from release, it received the latest release from Google quickly.

    And the Galaxy Nexus, released in Nov of 2011... has several KitKat and Lollipop custom ROMs.
    03-05-2015 02:50 PM
  9. dmls13's Avatar
    The Nexus 5 doesn't look bad, but it's a 2013 device. I plan to keep use my phone for as long as possible (I don't like to produce more waste than necessary), so it should be something current.

    Should I hold my breath waiting for the next Nexus and hope it will be of a more sensible size? Any rumors yet? :-)
    03-05-2015 03:24 PM
  10. LeoRex's Avatar
    Should I hold my breath waiting for the next Nexus and hope it will be of a more sensible size? Any rumors yet? :-)
    There are always rumors... current ones.. Both Huawei and LG might make Nexus phones... Huawei a smaller "Nexus 5 2015" type device with LG following it up with a larger form factor replacement for the Nexus 6. But we're a LOOOONG ways off from those since Google goes on a November release cycle with their phones.

    If you move from Nexus.... your next best bet might be a Moto I suppose... my only concern there is that the Moto line built its reputation of support and quick updates while Motorola was controlled by Google. Now that Lenovo owns them, it remains to be seen if they will retain that approach short or long term.

    Oh, and try to avoid carrier-sourced phones. Getting, say, a Galaxy S5 through a carrier means that any update has to come from Google, through Samsung and THEN through your carrier... Even if Samsung decides to update your phone, your carrier may not choose to have their model version included in the update. The fewer people deciding whether to update your phone, the better.
    03-06-2015 08:41 AM
  11. Haalcyon's Avatar
    From what I've just read here it seems like a Nexus 5 or a '14 Moto X are gonna be the closest to meet your wants.

    ♻from the Note III🍶
    03-06-2015 08:46 AM

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