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    Ry
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    Default Motorola’s Software Strategy

    Motorola has gone all-in with Android, starting with the first DROID. Motorola tried their own enhancements soon after with MotoBlur but as Android got better and arguably more user-friendly, the MotoBlur interface went to the wayside. Visually, the Gingerbread Motorola phones that eventually got Ice Cream Sandwich dropped the MotoBlur interface for the “stock” Android look and feel. This continued through Jelly Bean and the Moto X.

    At the Moto G announcement, Punit Soni, Software Product Management at Motorola, went over Motorola’s three tenets when it comes to software development on Android.

    1. Ensure that we build on a foundation of pure Android

    MotoBlur’s long gone. Expect the user interface on all new Motorola Android devices to look and feel like “stock” Android - not far off from a Nexus or a Google Play edition device. Motorola doesn’t want to take over the Android interface.

    2. Build experiences that compliment Android and Google services, not compete with them.

    You won’t see Moto Voice (S Voice) or Moto Translator (S Translator) or a Motorola App Store on a Motorola Android device. No need to double up on the excellent services that Google has already built.

    And like Google releasing their apps in the Play Store, Motorola is doing the same so updates to features like the camera won’t require a full system update.

    3. Ensure that we can build software that gives value back to the user.

    Motorola is answering the needs of users and building solutions that matter. Motorola Assist builds on Motorola’s experience with their previous Smart Actions application. With Motorola Assist, your phone can get out of the way during something important (meetings) or when you need your quiet time (sleep). And on devices like the Moto X, it can detect when you’re driving to send automatic replies while you focus on the road.

    Smartphones should be secured but most people find PIN locks cumbersome. Unlocking a locked phone is probably most done activity on a smartphone. With Trusted Bluetooth, anytime your phone is connected to a Bluetooth device you list as trusted, there is no need to lock your phone. And if the connection is lost, your phone gets locked automatically.

    As a fan of Android, I like what Motorola’s doing. They’ve made these three tenets their differentiating factor compared to the rest of the market and that’s a great thing - very fitting for a Google company.
    Android Central Moderator

    Motorola Moto X (212.55.26.ghost_verizon.Verizon.en.US, KitKat 4.4.4)
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    Default Re: Motorola’s Software Strategy

    Quote Originally Posted by Ry View Post
    Motorola has gone all-in with Android, starting with the first DROID. Motorola tried their own enhancements soon after with MotoBlur but as Android got better and arguably more user-friendly, the MotoBlur interface went to the wayside. Visually, the Gingerbread Motorola phones that eventually got Ice Cream Sandwich dropped the MotoBlur interface for the “stock” Android look and feel. This continued through Jelly Bean and the Moto X.

    At the Moto G announcement, Punit Soni, Software Product Management at Motorola, went over Motorola’s three tenets when it comes to software development on Android.

    1. Ensure that we build on a foundation of pure Android


    2. Build experiences that compliment Android and Google services, not compete with them.
    Both Moto and Sony have been doing well on these 2 tenets, whereas Samsung and LG are both taking a more veering away path with Android. I prefer the former method because Google is just flat our better at refining the UI and UX than Samsung and LG are. Touchwiz and LG UI both suffer from combining elements of gingerbread, ICS and JB in a slapdash manner. It would be ok if it was just at homescreen level but it penetrates deeper into sub menus and system apps (which a launcher cannot change - that comment was added for you folks who don't understand the difference between a launcher and an android skin ). The overall result ends up looking unpolished and unprofessional.
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    Default Re: Motorola’s Software Strategy

    I have not been as impressed with a smart phone since coming from a blackberry storm to the original droid.

    In my opinion, the Moto X is the best smartphone money can buy right now. It is the "smartest" smart phone. I am totally impressed with the form factor and build quality too.

    They have won themselves a dependable customer that has 5 phones on his plan. I cannot go back to a phone that is not "always listening" hands free. I do not think I could go back to not having active notifications either.
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    Default Re: Motorola’s Software Strategy

    Quote Originally Posted by zobog View Post
    I have not been as impressed with a smart phone since coming from a blackberry storm to the original droid.

    In my opinion, the Moto X is the best smartphone money can buy right now. It is the "smartest" smart phone. I am totally impressed with the form factor and build quality too.

    They have won themselves a dependable customer that has 5 phones on his plan. I cannot go back to a phone that is not "always listening" hands free. I do not think I could go back to not having active notifications either.
    Their software strategy (add TRIM and Bluetooth LE to the above) plus their hardware strategy (curved back and edge-to-edge display for a better feel in the hand) makes Moto X a winner.
    Android Central Moderator

    Motorola Moto X (212.55.26.ghost_verizon.Verizon.en.US, KitKat 4.4.4)
    Motorola Moto 360 (LWX48T, Lollipop 5.0.1)
    Motorola Moto G (210.12.41.falcon_cdma.Verizon.en.US, KitKat 4.4.4)
    Google Nexus 7 2012 (LRX21P, Lollipop 5.0)

    What other devices have I had? Here's my phone timeline.
    Support your favorite Android app and game developers. Pay for apps! And don't block ads!

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