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    Default Engadget Nexus One review

  2. #2  
    Cory Streater's Avatar
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    Looks like it's mostly a winner. However, something tells me those "quirks" they mention throughout the article - as possibly being pre production unit issues - will be in the final version too. I've been with HTC long enough to know that they always have issues like that on their phones. I guess we'll see.
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    Jeremy's Avatar
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    I'm holding my full opinion until 2.1 hits the Moto Droid.
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    Cory Streater's Avatar
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    The WiFi broswer test was lame. Yes, the iPhone won the test, but who knows if any of the pages from the test were cached from prior use. Also, I ran the same test that they did and got much better results on my Droid over Verizon's network than they did on the Wi-Fi network they were testing.
    Last edited by Cory Streater; 01-05-2010 at 10:20 PM.
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    herki's Avatar

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    I biggest part I took away was the last few sentences:

    It's a good Android phone, but not the last word -- in fact, if we had to choose between this phone or the Droid right now, we would lean towards the latter.
    I still don't regret getting the droid.
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    SharonW's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by herki View Post
    I biggest part I took away was the last few sentences:



    I still don't regret getting the droid.
    Me either, but I suspect that Google has more up its sleeve than the mere Nexus One on T-Mob.

    I think they have a rather intriguing strategy for making inroads on the openness front with the telcos as well as maintaining their manufacturer relationships.

    Think about the unsubsidized phone direct from Google. What good is a Google phone without a network? Incremental steps & inroads, Google's strategy to more openness.

    You buy it unsubsidized and then get T-Mobile's unsubsidized plan which is $20 less per mo., overall saving about $400 over 2 years. Tiny step, others ignore at their own peril. New rumors also have it that an additional Nexus One phone that's compatible with AT&T's network will be announced, totally unsubsidized. It works on AT&T, but you buy it from Google. So AT&T need not make any commitment more than allowing a cheaper phone plan (no subsidies) to those who bring their own compatible phones to the network. AT&T just announced last month that such a program existed and exclaimed how open they are.



    Coincidence? I think not. Perhaps that also helps AT&T keep any promises made to Apple on the exclusivity front for smart phones. Who knows. However, it also puts Apple on notice and lends AT&T some negotiation clout. Moreover, I don't see how people are believing that the iPhone will be off its exclusivity contract with AT&T this year. They have a 5-year contract and this is only year four. Doing this with Google would also offer AT&T the ability to prove its Apple's hardware or software problem causing dropped calls, if that is the case. The leverage this could provide AT&T and the thumb in the eye of Apple would be amazing. I'm truly seeing the method to Google's madness. It's sheer genius.

    Knowing that neither of the big two carriers, AT&T and Verizon, were open to the idea of openness (pun intended), it offered Verizon something it couldn't pass up...the Droid. The perfect union of Google working directly with MOT and giving Verizon exclusivity to a competitive smart phone to AT&T's iPhone. Foot in door, openness begins. Google and MOT stipulate no Verizon crapware loaded on top and no restrictions on apps.

    Meanwhile it's also working with HTC to produce the Nexus One, which is why HTC doesn't mind having a lower end (OS wise) Android competing on Verizon with the Droid. Each handset maker gets a "gimme" from direct Google involvement in development. It gives the Nexus subsidy plan to T-Mobile, the underdog, so as to continue to appear non-threatening as well as to thank them for being first telco to support Android.

    Part II unfolds next year or sooner with Google offering its own phone plan via VOIP & Google Voice after integrating their Gizmo5 purchase and having successfully pushed the big telcos into offering unsubsidized plans so that users can purchase data only plans to access Google VOIP. Dumb pipe conversion complete. Mobile internet market secured. Manufacturers happy. Google takes over the world.
  7. #7  
    TaeKwonDonkey's Avatar

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    And Google Skynet is reaches self awareness shortly afterwards
    jk

    But that is a great observation and I think that your speculation is point on. Turning the carriers into dumb pipes will definitely allow more people to have data and thus use Android phones. I'm not so sure about the VOIP thing though but then again its Google so its definitely possible and the funds are certainly there.
    And if the whole thing about the Nexus One on At&t showing that its not At&t's fault about the dropped calls, then that would be a real slap in Apple's face.
    Siemens CF62T> Samsung T329 Stripe Black> MyTouch 3G Black (Android 1.6 Donut)> Blackberry Bold 9700 (5.0.0.330)> Samsung T219 Brown (backup crap dumbphone)> Google/HTC Nexus One (CM7.2)> Google/LG Nexus 4 (Android 4.2.2)
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    Yea I'm pretty happy with my droid. I can honestly say it's the first phone (maybe ever) that has kept my interest enough so that I'm not looking for the next best thing. I could easily see myself passing on the n1 and I've pretty much gotten every "it" phone that verizon has released on release day.
  9. #9  
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    It's all beginning to unfold now and some "get it" and some do not. As I said, 2.1 is coming to Droid, the only difference between it and the Nexus One will be the hardware and given what I've read from those who have done geeky wizardry to get 2.1 on their Droid's, it snaps up Droid's performance just as much.

    This has all NOT been about a "Google Phone." To wit:

    Andy Rubin’s response to a question by Jason Chen during the Q & A:

    Q: Why was it necessary for Google to design the phone? Why couldn’t it just be an HTC phone running the new flavor of Android? And will these new features be coming to Droid?

    A: It’s inaccurate to say Google designed the phone (points to HTC CEO). [Google] is just merchandising it online. Everybody will get 2.1 when it’s open source, within a couple of days.
    See? It's all about the decoupling of cell phones from exclusivity, contracts, and telco domination of what you can use on your phone. Another choice tidbit:

    11:38AM From Rubin: “What I can tell you is the intention” of some future proofing on phones and more options for updates other than OTA.
    Get it? Just because a carrier doesn't want you to have a particular option/update doesn't mean you'll be confined to their whims or profit-making. I think the Google store will offer updates for download to computer then to phone bypassing the carrier completely. No nixing Google Voice or anything else.

    And here are others getting the idea of the store as well as the pricing possibilities with VOIP:
    Calling an End to Overpriced Cell Service

    ...The Google Nexus, unveiled Tuesday, may mark a healthy step in a better direction.

    Other people will focus on the phone's software, hardware, "apps" and the like. I'm more interested in something simpler: How it's sold–direct, unsubsidized and without a contract.

    Yes, you can buy it for $179 with a two-year contract with T-Mobile. But you can also get it for $529 with no contract, which means you can switch networks as much as you like.

    Great news.

    Consumers typically focus on the up-front cost of a phone, and that suits the network operators fine. They make the real money from you down the road, month after month, through the service fees.

    ...Of course you can buy some unlocked phones right now–but it's usually a niche way of operating. (I bought mine through an online reseller). Most people just get their phone from a mobile network. Google's move may take unlocking mainstream.

    Will this change the way we buy and pay for phones? Let's hope so. In the future, those using phones should be free to swap networks and plans as they wish–from monthly bills to daily ones to pay per use.

    That will mean more freedom, more transparency–and lower bills.

    More here:
    The Nexus One looks amazing. The G1 looked amazing, the Droid looked amazing, the Droid Eris looked amazing, and now the Nexus One looks even more amazing.

    The kicker is that it’s looking like you’ll be able to buy it without also getting a two-year phone contract to go along with it, albeit at a much higher upfront cost. But, given that Skype and Google Voice are readily available, that might not be such a bad thing.

    Kevin Tofel, writing for jkOnTheRun, has a similar outlook, except using the now-Google-owned Gizmo VoIP service in lieu of Skype:

    I’m betting on the Google Voice, Google Talk and Gizmo integration because if it comes to pass, it could be the beginning of the end for cellular voice plans.

    They do a price break-down here:
    This is a much bigger thang than a new Google phone.
  10. #10  
    SharonW's Avatar

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    Oh, and yeah, Engadget seems to have a bug up their ***. Here's another review from Tech Crunch's Michael Arrington, former iPhone owner and then Droid owner:

    I’ve been using the Nexus One with TMobile since mid-December as my primary mobile phone. This is the best Android powered phone to date. It’s also the fastest and most elegant smartphone on the market today, solidly beating the iPhone in most ways. In this rapidly evolving market there is sure to be something better just around the corner. But if you are looking to buy a high end smartphone right now, this is the phone for you. The Nexus One is the Android signature device.

    The full review:
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    TaeKwonDonkey's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by dman91 View Post
    This review was horrible. The author (Droid owner) was so biased and did anything to practically shun the N1. The other person in the video who doesn't own either device is probably an iPhone owner.

    First of all, the N1 should smoke the Droid and iPhone 3GS just because of its faster processor and having double the RAM of each device. I've seen other videos where the N1 beat the iPhone 3GS every time so I'm not buying into this review.
    I agree with you 100% there's some obvious bias there. I don't think that the N1 should smoke the other devices but I do think that someone's personal device may have heavily influenced that person's taste in this phone. However, I obviously have a bias towards the N1 so I'll probably find bias in any review demoting the N1. Everyone has bias, too bad Engadget wasn't able to hide it well
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