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  1. Thread Author  Thread Author    #1  

    Default bump charging?

    I saw this post on the HTC Droid Incredible about bump charging the phone. Is this something that we should do with the Evo? Has anyone done it? Is this something you do once, or every time you charge?

    Here are the instructions

    Charge your Incredible to max (green light).
    Unplug the phone and then turn it off.
    Plug it back in (should have an orange light now) and charge it to max again.
    Unplug the phone and turn it on. Wait for it to boot up.
    Turn the phone off and then plug it back in (should be an orange light again).
    Charge it to full (green light) again.
    Repeat this process until the light is green immediately upon plugging it back in.
    Thanked by:
    tadtam 
  2. #2  
    beezy's Avatar

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    I read that thread,i think them guys do it every morning before they go to work.
  3. Thread Author  Thread Author    #3  

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    Also, when you charge (regardless of bump or not) do you
    1 - leave the phone on or off?
    2 - charge overnight, or stay around to unplug soon after it goes green?
    3 - do you let the battery drain to a certain level before recharging?
  4. #4  
    2CupsWithString's Avatar
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    Is it really that bad? I think there has to be something for there to be such huge differences between different people.

    I charge overnight. Yesterday I used the phone from like 8AM off charger until 1AM on charger and it was still green. It alerted well over a hundred emails, had like two short phone calls and I straight up abused the web browser for probably 45 minutes total, (watching videos through dolphin HD).
  5. #5  

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    Just use this and battery life will never be a worry again. Just watch out for leaking battery acid.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bump charging?-htc-evo-super-battery.jpg  
  6. #6  

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    I have noticed a difference when I unplug then plug back in. I unplugged the phone for the second time this morning at 6:30, and my batterey is still at 91% at 10:30, I didn't plug it in while in the car.
  7. #7  
    AndroidOne's Avatar

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    I charge mine overnight (I leave my radio on 24/7), and notice that soon after disconnecting it the battery drops from 100% to the mid or low 90's within minutes. Lately I have plugged it back while I get ready to leave for work and by then the battery is 100% and lasts a lot longer than before with same usage. Been doing this only the past three days so is too early to know if this "technique" actually works.

    There is another post that attempts to explain why this may be happening in terms of the Evo's charging circuit not providing any trickle charge after the battery reaches 100%, in effect allowing the battery to be drained from that point on despite the charger still being attached to the phone. My understanding from that post is that disconnecting the charger and then connecting it again allows the charging circuitry to "reset" and top off the battery again.
    Last edited by AndroidOne; 06-25-2010 at 12:45 PM.
  8. Thread Author  Thread Author    #8  

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    Well, I guess something is different for my phone. I just charged it (while on). A minute or so after it went green I unplugged it and then turned the phone off. I plugged it back in and the light went orange and within less than a minute it was green again. I unplugged, turned on now, plugged back in, and it was green instantly.
  9. #9  

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    I just learned about this yesterday (didn't know it was called "bump charging") but it caused a HUGE improvement in my battery life. Hard to quantify without a systematic test but it seems like I get at least 50% longer battery life with the same usage. Could it be a placebo effect? Possibly I guess but not likely, I've tried other things that I concluded did NOT help.
  10. #10  

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    I tried this too yesterday. Right now my phone says 18 hours since last unplugged and I still have 50% of my battery left. Also, it stayed charged at 100% for a few hours instead of dropping within a few minutes of it being unplugged. I'm pretty impressed so far.
  11. #11  
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnadelman View Post
    Well, I guess something is different for my phone. I just charged it (while on). A minute or so after it went green I unplugged it and then turned the phone off. I plugged it back in and the light went orange and within less than a minute it was green again. I unplugged, turned on now, plugged back in, and it was green instantly.
    same here. is that good?
  12. #12  

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    Im not going through all that, when I charge my batteries on my Seidio desk top charger, I get a full solid charge. my battery stays at 100% for an hour or more, when I charge the battery in the phone it drops very quickly
  13. #13  
    AndroidOne's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by scott_0 View Post
    Im not going through all that, when I charge my batteries on my Seidio desk top charger, I get a full solid charge. my battery stays at 100% for an hour or more, when I charge the battery in the phone it drops very quickly
    This is consistent with the explanation offered regarding the internal charging circuitry on the Evo. One of the theories stated on a similar thread is that the internal charging circuitry tops off the battery and then shuts down. Even when the phone remains connected to the power source with a green light the phone in effect is drawing power for it's operation from the battery rather than the charging circuit, draining battery power.

    This theory is consistent with my observations: after leaving the phone connected to the charger overnight, the battery indicates 100% charge before disconnecting, just to drop to the mid to low 90's a few minutes after is off external power. The fact your externally charged battery has a good life and shows 100% when you start using it provides some additional support to this theory.

    I am using a far simpler charging procedure than the one described by the OP with excellent results. I just leave my phone charging all night and remove it from the charger when I get up. Then connect it again while I get ready for work or in the car on my way to work. Once the battery reaches 100%, remove from charger and continue normal operations for the day. With this "procedure", my battery life has increased noticeably.
    Thanked by:
    tadtam 
  14. #14  

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    I have tried the same procedure that AndroidOne uses and have found the same increase in battery life that he does. I easily get 16 hours whereas previously was lucky to get 10 hours
  15. #15  
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    I REALLY wish I knew what to do with my phone ... I have tried many of the advices here including reset but my battery is failing ... I am so pissed ... I am getting 5 hours ... 5 .. No joke ... HEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEEELP
  16. #16  

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    hey solo1
    i had similar result on my wife phone. i would recommend changing the how frequent you fetch email. and what really help was advance app killer. i did all this to my phone and then use the same method that androidone mention it really work.
    but one thing that i did that no one mention but they prob did was to leave he phone fully discharge. i was told this would help the battery .
  17. #17  

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    If you haven't already, load up the Spare Parts and System Panel apps. These will let you track what applications are using CPU, and what's using the battery. Without this sort of information, you're shooting in the dark.

    A number of people have found that doing a hard reset has solved their battery problems. It seems that sometimes a process can get "stuck", and use lots of battery. Figuring out what that process is, or simply killing it by doing a reset, might address your battery problem.

    Yes, you can use an automatic task killer, but a better approach, I think, is to figure out what is actually causing the problem, and dealing with that, rather that simply killing apps willy-nilly.
    PLEASE, when asking for help provide as much information as possible. We can't help unless we know what the symptoms are and what you did before they began.

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  18. #18  

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    What are the chances of battery damage with bumb charging? Have any of you done this for a extended time period with ANY phone? Thanks
  19. #19  

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    I haven't tried this and probably won't. The battery in phones is similar in chemistry to the one used in RC airplanes/helis.

    4.2v is the safe maximum. If you unplug and plug them in they will "Charge" some more.
    Notice the "". The chargers initially put out a lot of current, I believe phones charge at 1c meaning a 1500mAH battery can charge at 1.5 amps.
    That would charge any battery in an hour theoretically BUT at the battery reaches 4.2v the charger reduces the current going into the battery. Plugging it in and reconnecting it will give a really low current "maintenance" charge. It's not adding much. If it did you'd be over that 4.2v limit and risk a nasty overcharge Li batteries like to exploded or at least lose capacity very fast when overcharged.
    Evo4G. Now with more Internet.
  20. #20  
    AndroidOne's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by bluediablito View Post
    ...but one thing that i did that no one mention but they prob did was to leave he phone fully discharge. i was told this would help the battery .
    This is another area of debate. Many experts say letting your battery discharge or even go red before connecting to the charger somehow damages these new lithium batteries, decreases the charge they can hold and/or lower their lifespan. I am not a chemist, so I will not argue for or against this statement, someone with the appropriate knowledge can chime in and explain either way.

    However, I can tell you from experience (and you can see how many smartphones I have owned over the years) many times I leave my battery go to the yellow or red before hooking it up to the charger. Have done this for years on other phones and have never (ever!) experienced any problem with battery not holding full charge or having decreased service life.


    AS FOR MY BATTERY SAVING SETTINGS...

    I have Always-On mobile data enabled (makes phone more stable IMHO), I don't have IM/Chat, Twiter or Facebook updating at all (have little use for those and can update Facebook manually whenever needed). I have my mail set to download hourly from 0800-2000 and manually during the night, my HTC clock/weather widget refreshing hourly and WeatherBug the same.

    Keep my 4G, Hotspot, WiFi and GPS radios off at all times, only turning on when in use. Turned off the ambient light sensor (keeps my screen too bright all the time), changed brightness to 25% indoors and 50% outdoors. I use the HTC and Adroid Power widgets to control my radios, and Brightness Level (CurveFish) widget for the screen. I find these widgets allow for quick and easy control of these settings.

    For monitoring what Android does, I installed Android System Info (ElectricSheep) to monitor power consumption and system resource usage. It also has a simple built-in task manager/killer although I rarely if ever use it for anything. To monitor my battery level I installed SysTray Monitor (Creafire AG), it places a small and elegant percent label on the tray to keep tabs of your battery level at all times. All of these apps can be found in the market for free.

    And there you have it, hope you find this information useful.
    Last edited by AndroidOne; 06-27-2010 at 08:21 PM.
  21. #21  

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    Worked for me last night. Friday I left my phone on fully charged and it was %60 dead by sat morning. Then sat night I did the bump charge and left my phone on and this morning I woke up to find my phone still had 92% battery life. I was shocked to see it work.
  22. #22  

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    The problem I have with bump charging is that it may well defeat the lifespan saving features of the charge controller in the phone. The single biggest killer of LiIon batteries is OVER charging and a good deal of what goes into the charge controller is over charge prevention. Now, if you bypass the charge limiter you may well get higher capacity out of the battery for a period of time but are more likely to see that battery die an early death from over charging.

    On the plus side, the battery can be easily replaced and at about $40 it may be worth replacing every 3 months if that gets you 20% more on time per charge with the phone.


    Brian
  23. #23  
    AndroidOne's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by Raptor View Post
    The problem I have with bump charging is that it may well defeat the lifespan saving features of the charge controller in the phone. The single biggest killer of LiIon batteries is OVER charging and a good deal of what goes into the charge controller is over charge prevention. Now, if you bypass the charge limiter you may well get higher capacity out of the battery for a period of time but are more likely to see that battery die an early death from over charging.

    On the plus side, the battery can be easily replaced and at about $40 it may be worth replacing every 3 months if that gets you 20% more on time per charge with the phone.


    Brian
    Brian, as I stated earler the charging circuit on the Evo appears to shut-off completely once the battery level reaches 100%. From that point on it appears the phone starts draining power from the battery rather than the charger thereby draining the former even while the charger is still attached. This would explain why the battery reads 100% right when the charger is disconnected, only to drop in just a few minutes to the low 90's.

    IF WHAT I AM SAYING IS INDEED CORRECT, then reconnecting your phone to the charger a few minutes after disconnecting it, and charging again until green, is unlikely to cause any overcharging as the circuitry will shut-off again (perhaps a safety mechanism engineered into the charging circuit to prevent overcharging). I am not saying that my theory of how the Evo charging circuit works is correct, but seems to fit the empirical observations of several of us.

    If someone has access to highly sensitive metering equipment, measuring the mA draw on the charger as the battery reaches 100% and beyond, can help clarify the issue of whether the Evo goes into trickle charge mode or shuts-off completely once the battery is fully charged.
    Last edited by AndroidOne; 06-27-2010 at 08:38 PM.
  24. #24  

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    Lithium Ion batteries do not like to be fully discharged, nor overcharged. Cars like the Chevy Volt are designed to keep the charge between 25% and 75% under normal conditions to maximize the life of the battery pack. Of course, the battery in the Evo doesn't cost $20,000 to replace, but continually running it into the yellow or red will reduce its overall life. Keeping it topped up as much as possible, without over charging it, will maximize life.

    Also, slower charging is better for the battery than fast charging, at least in part because it generates less heat. I wouldn't use anything more than the stock 1 amp charger. There's also pretty strong evidence in another thread that the EVO does NOT "trickle charge" the phone under any circumstances. Unplugging and replugging the charge will give it more charge, but once the circuitry decides the battery is at full charge, it shuts down charging completely, again.

    I have always on data, keep the BT and GPS radios on all the time, sync 2 mail accounts (Gmail and EAS) in real time, and update weather hourly. I don't use facebook or twitter. I get between 12 and 15 hours on a charge. (Today, on wifi almost all day instead of 3G, I hit 50% battery at 12 1/2 hours.)

    I haven't had issues that needed a hard reset to try to fix, but there does seem to be some evidence that for those with very poor battery life, a hard reset can fix the problem. At least in some cases.

    I've used System Panel and Spare Parts to monitor what's going on in the system, and found them very informative.

    HTH,
    PLEASE, when asking for help provide as much information as possible. We can't help unless we know what the symptoms are and what you did before they began.

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  25. #25  
    AndroidOne's Avatar

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    ^
    Interesting information. Do you use any "special" procedure to charge up your battery?
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