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  1. Thread Author  Thread Author    #1  

    Default Juice Defender

    I installed the free Juice Defender app from the marketplace. What a huge difference!

    Anybody else using it?

    I left it on standard set up and I am very pleased. Any feedback in using aggressive settings?

    Sent from my PC36100 using Tapatalk
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    Which Juice defender are you using? I see 3 of them in the Market.
  3. #3  
    tube517's Avatar

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    I use JD and love it. It's made a big difference in my battery life.
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    I use the free one and have seen a big difference in battery life.
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    I used it with great results. But ultimately I had to stop, because while it was going my accounts did not sync. And extra battery life is pointless if my phone isn't giving the updates I need.

    I think though this won't be the case for everyone. Android and evos seem fun that way. No two devices act exactly alike. But unfortunately for me, that's the case.
  6. #6  

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    I must be doing something wrong. I first dowloaded the JiuceDefender Free from the marketplace. Did not see ANY difference in battery life within a week so I then uninstalled it.

    I then downloaded JuiceDefender Beta and after 2 days, have seen a VERY minimal improvement. It does block some of my updates and such and I personally do not think its worth it.

    I must be doing something wrong because everyone else seems to love it...lol
  7. Thread Author  Thread Author    #7  

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    Quote Originally Posted by canterrain View Post
    I used it with great results. But ultimately I had to stop, because while it was going my accounts did not sync. And extra battery life is pointless if my phone isn't giving the updates I need.

    I think though this won't be the case for everyone. Android and evos seem fun that way. No two devices act exactly alike. But unfortunately for me, that's the case.
    As I read your post, I suddenly realized why I was having sync problems. Although, I did not think to blame Juice Defender. Instead (after a google search) I did a Calendar, calendar storage and sync "clear" in the settings of my Evo and it fixed the problem. It seems that Evo does not like to install the Juice Defender after the calendar sync has occurred. Once i cleared the storage, I simply hit "sync all" and it is now working without the error. I did lose my calendar items on my phone, but not on my Outlook.

    Hope this helps.
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    You know, I've been a member for a little while now. We touch this subject before about Juice Defender. To tell you truth, its been maybe 90% negative feedback about this app. Nothing really positive.
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    It does turn your data off and on for you which of course helps battery life.
    HTC Evo 4G | Playstation 3 (60 GB) | Texas Longhorns | San Antonio Spurs | Dallas Cowboys
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    Juice Defender = Fancy Word for Task Killer
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    Quote Originally Posted by RkyMtnHigh View Post
    Juice Defender = Fancy Word for Task Killer
    Sorry, but this is completely false. Have you even tried Juice Defender?

    It is NOT a task killer. What it manages is the connectivity of your device to network data. If you always need your device connected to the network 100% of the time (because you need constant notifications from facebook, email, etc.) then JuiceDefender is not for you.

    However, in its default configuration it will turn the network on every fifteen minutes to allow apps like your mail, facebook, etc. to sync and then will turn it back off. This is perfectly fine for me. It goes by your screen lock state. If your screen unlocked is on it does nothing, but when your screen locks and no app is running using data it will turn your mobile data off.

    This saves a lot of battery and has a very noticeable affect for my battery life.

    The only gotcha that I see is that when you unlock your phone sometimes it can take a couple of seconds to get reconnected to the network. So, for instance, say I want to check facebook -- I unlock my phone, hit my facebook shortcut and occasionally facebook will be trying to access the network before it is fully connected so you will get an error and have to exit out and go back into facebook. To me, that is a minor inconvenience for getting quite a few more hours of life out of my battery.

    I use the free version and I must say it is getting me a noticeable gain on my battery life. Obviously to each his own, and if it doesn't work for you then don't use it. But it sure doesn't hurt to try installing it and using it for a week.
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    If ever I need to ensure I have battery life I just turn off my 3G, 4G, GPS, and wifi. I was able to still text and, by the end of my 16 hour shift, I had 50% or so battery life remaining. (I had forgotten my charger) I'd rather be in control that way than use an app to essentially do the same thing. Just my opinion. I'm sure it's good for some.
  13. #13  

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    Quote Originally Posted by chappo2000 View Post
    If ever I need to ensure I have battery life I just turn off my 3G, 4G, GPS, and wifi. I was able to still text and, by the end of my 16 hour shift, I had 50% or so battery life remaining. (I had forgotten my charger) I'd rather be in control that way than use an app to essentially do the same thing. Just my opinion. I'm sure it's good for some.
    Exactly, to each his own. I like not having to be turning it on and off all day long myself and would rather it just be done every 15 minutes for me.

    I just wanted to make sure anyone reading this thread that Juice Defender is NOT a task killer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RkyMtnHigh View Post
    Juice Defender = Fancy Word for Task Killer

    misinformed much, last time I checked Juice Defender didn't in any shape or form attempt to kill or manage tasks on any level whatsoever.
  15. #15  

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    Quote Originally Posted by canterrain View Post
    I used it with great results. But ultimately I had to stop, because while it was going my accounts did not sync. And extra battery life is pointless if my phone isn't giving the updates I need.
    I uninstalled it after I installed an extended battery for the same reason. It was a worthwhile trade-off (IMO) when using the standard battery though.
  16. #16  
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    If it kills the task, (even for 15 minutes at a time) it is a task killer. Semantics. And no, I don't use it. My battery last me all day with moderate use, and I don't use Facebook.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unibrow View Post
    misinformed much, last time I checked Juice Defender didn't in any shape or form attempt to kill or manage tasks on any level whatsoever.
    Whoa whoa whoa....If it is stopping the phone from performing a task when it wants to, and relegates it to doing it's job based on the apps schedule being modified by the new app (JD) it is most CERTAINLY "manag(ing) tasks".
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    I couldn't care less if ya'll use it or not, but unwad the panties. My opinion is it is a task killer, and yours is that its not. Whoopee.
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    it manages your data connection, it doesnot control any apps. Task killers actively KILL tasks and attempt to manage memory better than Android does, this doesn't do that.

    I work daily in a lead lined room, by your definition, the room that I'm in is a task killer....
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unibrow View Post
    it manages your data connection, it doesnot control any apps. Task killers actively KILL tasks and attempt to manage memory better than Android does, this doesn't do that.

    I work daily in a lead lined room, by your definition, the room that I'm in is a task killer....
    Your last quote:

    last time I checked Juice Defender didn't in any shape or form attempt to kill or manage tasks on any level whatsoever.

    And now you say:

    "it manages your data connection"

    Which is it?

    I would consider your "lead-lined room" (I don't care if it's a kryptonite lined room) as a battery killer if you don't have something that manages how often your phone connects to data.
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    Quote Originally Posted by RkyMtnHigh View Post
    Your last quote:

    last time I checked Juice Defender didn't in any shape or form attempt to kill or manage tasks on any level whatsoever.

    And now you say:

    "it manages your data connection"

    Which is it?

    I would consider your "lead-lined room" (I don't care if it's a kryptonite lined room) as a battery killer if you don't have something that manages how often your phone connects to data.

    Juice defender doesn't manage tasks, such as apps which is what a task killer does. It manages YOUR DATA CONNECTION, which you could argue is a "task" but task killers for all intents and purposes are defined as unnecessary memory management which is NOT what juice defender does. I

    I'm not going to have an argument on why you are wrong beyond this, you just are. If you want to define Juice Defender as a Task Killer, well that's fine. But you'd be as uninformed as the people that are using Task Killers to manage their Android devices memory.
  22. #22  

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    Quote Originally Posted by RkyMtnHigh View Post
    I couldn't care less if ya'll use it or not, but unwad the panties. My opinion is it is a task killer, and yours is that its not. Whoopee.
    It manages settings, not tasks. I completely agree with you task killers are bad, and would not use one because they cause more trouble than they are worth.

    Labeling it as a task killer will frighten people away from it, I just wanted everyone to know that it is not in the same boat as task killers at all. You will find hundreds of places online, and Google themselves, saying that task killers are not needed. Therefore when you say "Juice Defender = Fancy Word for Task Killer" people will think they shouldn't use Juice Defender.

    While you say it is just semantics, no it is not, two totally different things.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey47 View Post
    It manages settings, not tasks. I completely agree with you task killers are bad, and would not use one because they cause more trouble than they are worth.

    Labeling it as a task killer will frighten people away from it, I just wanted everyone to know that it is not in the same boat as task killers at all. You will find hundreds of places online, and Google themselves, saying that task killers are not needed. Therefore when you say "Juice Defender = Fancy Word for Task Killer" people will think they shouldn't use Juice Defender.

    While you say it is just semantics, no it is not, two totally different things.

    Ok, I see your labeling of it being a setting manager...I also just read several articles (just google a syntax with the words "juice defender task killer" and some others if you like) and go to the Sprint topics or Verizon ones and their engineers say it takes more power to turn ON the radios than it does just to leave them idle, not using any power. Especially if you're doing it every 15 minutes. It's the behind the scenes stuff that is saving the battery, and it involves killing (errr...managing) certain tasks. If you exit your browser using the HOME button, whatever page was loaded simply sits there in memory. When you kill the radios, Juice Defender also clears the memory, so now you have to refire the radios, and re-download the page that would have been sitting there had you not. (including email, facebook, and whatever else also) I agree completely that Facebook needs its own battery to function properly on a phone, but that is what's eating your battery...not the radios. Set Facebook not to sync up and you'll get the same effect as using Juice Defender. I've been looking at thousands of different threads about it at work today....because the boss is gone!!! Cheers!! Actually, I'm ahead at work, but it feels good to type that

    Edit: Of course, for every thread that coherently explains that it's the syncing that eats the battery, there are 10 more that say "Juice defender works because my battery lasts longer using it", or something to that effect...It's the syncing though....not the radios.
    Last edited by RkyMtnHigh; 05-24-2011 at 03:13 PM.
  24. #24  

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    Quote Originally Posted by RkyMtnHigh View Post
    Ok, I see your labeling of it being a setting manager...I also just read several articles (just google a syntax with the words "juice defender task killer" and some others if you like) and go to the Sprint topics or Verizon ones and their engineers say it takes more power to turn ON the radios than it does just to leave them idle, not using any power. Especially if you're doing it every 15 minutes. It's the behind the scenes stuff that is saving the battery, and it involves killing (errr...managing) certain tasks. If you exit your browser using the HOME button, whatever page was loaded simply sits there in memory. When you kill the radios, Juice Defender also clears the memory, so now you have to refire the radios, and re-download the page that would have been sitting there had you not. (including email, facebook, and whatever else also) I agree completely that Facebook needs its own battery to function properly on a phone, but that is what's eating your battery...not the radios. Set Facebook not to sync up and you'll get the same effect as using Juice Defender. I've been looking at thousands of different threads about it at work today....because the boss is gone!!! Cheers!! Actually, I'm ahead at work, but it feels good to type that

    Edit: Of course, for every thread that coherently explains that it's the syncing that eats the battery, there are 10 more that say "Juice defender works because my battery lasts longer using it", or something to that effect...It's the syncing though....not the radios.
    Glad the boss is away and you are caught up -- two of my most happy times during the day!!!

    I would really love the links because I can't find the articles that you are referencing.

    I think I did find one, but I think you misquoted it. This sprint users forum post: if you look at post #7 it says almost exactly word for word what you said, with one important difference.

    You said "If you exit your browser using the HOME button, whatever page was loaded simply sits there in memory. When you kill the radios, Juice Defender also clears the memory, so now you have to refire the radios, and re-download the page that would have been sitting there had you not."

    But that post says: "Once a page is loaded and you leave the app with the home button, it is not using any battery. It is just loaded in memory ready to be used. Actually, killing it and reloading it into memory the next time you need it consumes more power. "

    He is not talking about turning the radio off, he is talking about exiting the browser forces it to reload the page.

    Saying that turning the mobile network on and off does seem to have some logic to it, but I just can't find any justification (not that it doesn't exist). But what you suggested seems crazy to me. If I have a browser open, turn the mobile network off, turn mobile network back on, why would that web page have to reload unless I went to my browser and hit refresh? I will test this out this evening and report back.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mikey47 View Post
    Glad the boss is away and you are caught up -- two of my most happy times during the day!!!

    I would really love the links because I can't find the articles that you are referencing.

    I think I did find one, but I think you misquoted it. This sprint users forum post: if you look at post #7 it says almost exactly word for word what you said, with one important difference.

    You said "If you exit your browser using the HOME button, whatever page was loaded simply sits there in memory. When you kill the radios, Juice Defender also clears the memory, so now you have to refire the radios, and re-download the page that would have been sitting there had you not."

    But that post says: "Once a page is loaded and you leave the app with the home button, it is not using any battery. It is just loaded in memory ready to be used. Actually, killing it and reloading it into memory the next time you need it consumes more power. "

    He is not talking about turning the radio off, he is talking about exiting the browser forces it to reload the page.

    Saying that turning the mobile network on and off does seem to have some logic to it, but I just can't find any justification (not that it doesn't exist). But what you suggested seems crazy to me. If I have a browser open, turn the mobile network off, turn mobile network back on, why would that web page have to reload unless I went to my browser and hit refresh? I will test this out this evening and report back.
    The part about the home button and clearing memory was 2-3 different articles I pieced together from different pages. I'll find it, but it's going to take me a bit. The memory clearing part is ONLY with the "advanced features" of "JD Ultimate" in the most advanced setting. That version has several "enhancements", and works like a gigantic task killer for lack of a better term. One of the items is a "memory enhancement tool" or something like that which effectively clears the memory when the radios get turned off. I'll find it, but I'm in a sensory overload at the moment trying to sort through conflicting articles/user experiences. I'm coming across a lot more articles of people having problems with it right now and am trying to find a commonality, but it appears to be like any other app (e.g. Runs great on mine and causes yours to lock up, or vice-versa with no rhyme or reason for it) I personally think that's the biggest problem with the Android OS; sloppily written apps. I say that as we could have identical phones with just a couple of different apps, and we both download a new app that comes out and our phones may completely different.

    Give me a few...Hopefully I can track it back down, but I was using a work puter so I'll have to start from scratch here and I used a bunch of different syntax.
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