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  1. Thread Author  Thread Author    #26  

    Default Re: Chrome, Firefox, Opera or Dolphin?

    I ended up back on the stock browser. I only save unimportant PWs. It's not a big deal if someone breaks into my Facebook, Twitter, instagram accounts which I don't have.

    3 versions of opera, why? Which one ?
  2. #27  

    Default Re: Chrome, Firefox, Opera or Dolphin?

    Quote Originally Posted by AnimalMotherASF View Post
    I ended up back on the stock browser. I only save unimportant PWs. It's not a big deal if someone breaks into my Facebook, Twitter, instagram accounts which I don't have.

    3 versions of opera, why? Which one ?
    Mini runs on everything, only works via proxy, has only partial support for scripts and page modification. Also notable as the first true browser alternative on iPhone, and one of the first with massive speed and data savings. No longer alone tho.

    Mobile Classic used to just be 'Mobile'. Based on a recompiled fork of desktop version Opera prior to the version 15 leap. Original implementation of a data saving mode in a full browser, using plugin click-to-play and conversion of JPEGs (originally to worse JPEGs, then later to nearly lossless WEBP format instead). Turbo also made a big improvement in 3G speed overall because the single proxy masked the lag you would normally get requesting content from multiple domains.

    'Opera' is now based on a type of Chrome, but with various gradual changes. Both desktop and mobile versions. There is still a proxy mode, tho it seems to me like a microimplementation of Opera Mini. Can save pages for offline view, saves bookmarks in a nested thumbnail structure. If you go over 100 tabs thr counter becomes a shuriken and the 'New Tab' button is replaced with a ninja and the message "fight the tabs". Continues the tradition of optional Private tab browsing and can maintain normal and private sessions at the same time. I do not like the recent change in how it handles embedded videos though.
  3. #28  

    Default Re: Chrome, Firefox, Opera or Dolphin?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mooncatt View Post
    Chrome at least is probably still vulnerable (I didn't find any more recent articles than this), and you can still see saved passwords in plain text.

    http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/sav...ry?id=19908237

    And with a reputable manager program, you wouldn't have to worry about criminal background. If the encryption is done locally, and everything transmitted/stored to their servers is encrypted data, then you're safe. Like was said about Last Pass's system, you could hand your stored data to the NSA, and even they likely wouldn't be able to hack your info without the master password... Which is also only saved encrypted on their servers. LP never has access to your un-encrypted info. I'm sure the other well known companies have similar safeguards. I agree, do your research and don't trust some fly by night company that no one knows about. But after looking into just what goes on with LP's system, there's very little to worry about.
    I am guessing you didn't read the article because it states Google was going to fix this issue soon and it was. The article is also almost a year old. Chrome uses local encryption to secure your passwords but yes anyone you give access to your OS user account will then be able to view your passwords.

    The truth is 99% of the time your accounts get breached at the point of creation where the hacker get the password straight from the source because encryption is a joke anyway. All encryptions are decrypted within a week of release/use.

    The reality is insurance and frequent password changes are the only line of defense you get against any real threats.

    Something abit more recent without a major network trying to fluff the story to sensationalize it.
    http://security.stackexchange.com/qu...ve-it-signed-i
  4. #29  

    Default Re: Chrome, Firefox, Opera or Dolphin?

    As I said in that post, the article I linked to was the most recent I found. If Chrome and other browsers have some form of encryption now, then I stand corrected. Since I don't rely on their built in password vault, it's not something I've bothered to keep up to date on. That said, it's debatable which could be better, worse, or even equal. Like Last Pass can also keep secured notes and the premium subscription (required for mobile device use) also has credit monitoring as an additional service. Plus, not only can it remotely kill any/all in use sessions and remove access, but can also easily help you generate new passwords to update sites with and has its own virtual keyboard to prevent key logging.
  5. #30  

    Default Re: Chrome, Firefox, Opera or Dolphin?

    Quote Originally Posted by zedorda View Post
    I am guessing you didn't read the article because it states Google was going to fix this issue soon and it was. The article is also almost a year old. Chrome uses local encryption to secure your passwords but yes anyone you give access to your OS user account will then be able to view your passwords.

    The truth is 99% of the time your accounts get breached at the point of creation where the hacker get the password straight from the source because encryption is a joke anyway. All encryptions are decrypted within a week of release/use.

    The reality is insurance and frequent password changes are the only line of defense you get against any real threats.

    Something abit more recent without a major network trying to fluff the story to sensationalize it.
    Is saving passwords in Chrome as safe as using LastPass if you leave it signed in? - Information Security Stack Exchange
    Encryption is excellent but requires vigilance. Figuratively it is forever one Post-it Note away from being compromised. Insofar as credit card data, SSNs and other such items stolen; yes, the highest volume compromised is from large 3rd party repositories. The most dangerous is instead on a personal level through social engineering and knowledge of the victim, where again all normal precautions are moot. Some encryptions are still more or less unbreakable, but they have been instead undermined via conventional means.

    Insurance is ...dodgy, after all they would rather not honor a lot of claims. Changing passwords is almost as much a joke as passwords themselves, for the EXACT reasons as you laid out! Biometrics needs to be imprecise, and the mechanisms in place are iffy. Such systems have been broken at worst the same day they debut on the market.

    StackExchange threads are about one notch above Wikipedia. That said, one very nasty bug years ago was the Debian Weak Keys debacle. Many millions of keys on many platforms had been generated with only about 2000 possible outcomes, in many cases ables to be narrowed to a few hundred candidates once the key type was profiled. It wasn't very badly exploited but the flaw was *years* old and had been *introduced* into previously good code. The top use was credential impersonation, such as through manufactured browser cookies which would let you into personal account pages on a web site. Another was breaking local keystores which themselves were weakly encrypted, and then using the real keys to access *remote* keystores which were also weakly encrypted. At that point one could sometimes compromise the entire network of machines within a domain or web service.

    And all this is still not as embarrassing as it gets. Security is an uphill battle and most of us may as well not even try to stay ahead.
  6. #31  

    Default Re: Chrome, Firefox, Opera or Dolphin?

    Eventually, passwords as such are going to be dinosaurs. Encryption sticks, biometrics, 2-step verifications.... We're already well on our way.

    Passwords have proven so completely unsafe that it's a running joke. The question isn't what major company has suffered breaches, but which hasn't? Something like Heartbleed simply puts this into clear focus, but it wasn't exactly safe BEFORE that, either. At last count, btw, despite all the PR this has gotten, one estimate I saw was that some 300,000 servers still hadn't bothered to fix the heartbleed insecurity! And I wonder how many people haven't bothered to change login data on sites that have fixed things? Of course, if someone got all your personal details, changing the PW now may be just a little bit better than locking the barn door after the horse has already escaped, but still useful and lots of people haven't done it.... I wonder... if you picked out 20 people at random on the street and say "what's Heartbleed bug?"--I bet 2/3rds will not even know what you're talking about.

    Password security. An oxymoron.
  7. #32  

    Default Re: Chrome, Firefox, Opera or Dolphin?

    Dolphin I found to be the ball round best, not to mention it's FAST

    Posted via Android Central App
  8. Thread Author  Thread Author    #33  

    Default Re: Chrome, Firefox, Opera or Dolphin?

    Does anyone use the HTC mobile browser labeled as Internet as their main browser?
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