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  1. Thread Author  Thread Author    #1  

    Default Can I stop the auto-adjusting brightness on camera?

    I have never liked my Droid X's camera because it takes much too dim of a picture, with or without the flash.
    When I go to focus on the object I'm taking the picture of, say in sunlight on my floor inside, it goes from a bright image down to a dark image within a second or so....auto-adjusting.
    This ALWAYS leads to too dim of a picture.
    For example, trying to take a picture of white boardhsorts in direct sunlight in front of my bay window looks like I am taking a pic in a closet.

    Can I turn this auto adjustment off? IT does it no matter which mode the X is in.

    TIA!!!
  2. #2  
    Arelunde's Avatar
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    You might try the app Vignette, which enables a vast number of different settings, including the ability to have no shutter sound. Some feel the native camera takes sharper photos than Vignette, but the added flexibility of Vignette may be worthwhile. There's a sticky thread in this forum with X photos -- some with settings included -- that might help you.
    Last edited by Arelunde; 03-11-2011 at 04:55 PM. Reason: correct typo
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  3. #3  
    jdbower's Avatar

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    Menu --> Settings --> Exposure

    Setting it to a negative number will under-expose (make the image darker), setting it to a positive number will over-expose (make the image brighter).

    Part of the problem is the poor dynamic range of camera phone sensors (and digital in general), you may not be able to find a good setting that gets the detail you want without blowing out the highlights. This is hard to fix in-camera, but there are some HDR (High Dynamic Range) techniques the involve taking images at various exposure settings (called "bracketing") that allow you to combine them in post processing. These are generally only useful with a tripod and still subjects.
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  4. #4  
    broadwayblues's Avatar

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    Quote Originally Posted by jdbower View Post
    Menu --> Settings --> Exposure

    Setting it to a negative number will under-expose (make the image darker), setting it to a positive number will over-expose (make the image brighter).

    Part of the problem is the poor dynamic range of camera phone sensors (and digital in general), you may not be able to find a good setting that gets the detail you want without blowing out the highlights. This is hard to fix in-camera, but there are some HDR (High Dynamic Range) techniques the involve taking images at various exposure settings (called "bracketing") that allow you to combine them in post processing. These are generally only useful with a tripod and still subjects.
    I have experimented with these settings and usually end up getting them fairly close to what I need and end up fixing the photos in iPhoto.

    Thanks for the lesson though, interesting read!
  5. #5  

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    Vignette has the same issue in my opinion but I usually can fix a dark shot with the stock cameras editing software built into the DroidX. Have you tried using the editing app? Click left menu button while in photo and select edit / Advance Editing

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  6. Thread Author  Thread Author    #6  

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    The editing app on the X is just o.k., you can see how it gets blown out very quickly though so I was hoping for a better fix.
    I will read up on Vignette and try it out, thanks guys.

    Other than size, the camera is the only beef I have with this phone....but I don't want to carry around my camera anymore so my phones' camera is growing more important to me month by month. My next phones' main feature will be an outstanding camera.
  7. #7  
    Arelunde's Avatar
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    Wildman, How did you get that cool type on your screen??
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  8. #8  

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arelunde View Post
    Wildman, How did you get that cool type on your screen??
    I used Font Changer to customize my fonts from https://market.android.com/details?i...=search_result and you can search google for 1001 free fonts and find tons on font files.
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  9. #9  
    Arelunde's Avatar
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    Thanks Wildman!

    To the OP - I was thinking about your problem and it had a familiar sound. I've had my X since it was released last July, so some of the issues are only vague memories at this point.

    However, one thing with the stock camera (which I use and think is fantastic since the Froyo update) - you have to be careful if your scene has anything bright in it. Even a string that has sunlight on it in an otherwise shadow photo can affect the lens opening (the automatic adjustment to which you refer.)

    When you get ready to take the photo, aim the camera into the largest area that is what you want to show up (sunlight or shadow). touch the screen once to lock the setting, and then aim at what you want to shoot. Touch screen again and take the photo. It will be exposed to the sunlight or shadow you selected.

    Hope this makes sense. I generally don't use the camera button, but it would work with that too.
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