05-25-2017 01:48 PM
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  1. GSDer's Avatar
    Looks like ours are only designed to last for 300-500 charges, going on the various sources of information.

    I've had my 6P 14 months and charged it an average of 1.5 times per day. This means I've already given it around 600 charges.
    That 300-500 cycles is a good ballpark although I haven't looked at what this specific battery is rated at.

    However, there's a common misconception that just plugging your phone in counts as one charge cycle. It actually depends on how depleted the battery is when you start charging and how fully you charge it. If you believe the folks at AccuBattery https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...es.accubattery then see the attached screenshots for an example: the cycle count 'cost' in both examples start at the same depletion level, but one ends charging at 80% full (0.16 cycle cost) and the other at 100% full (0.91 cycle cost).You be the judge...
    03-15-2017 06:17 PM
  2. LeoRex's Avatar
    I've been trying to find out how long a LiPo battery should last. Looks like ours are only designed to last for 300-500 charges, going on the various sources of information.
    Those are 'full' charge cycles. As was said, a partial charge is harder to judge.

    But with battery tech being used now, following best practices is more important than ever. Try to avoid deep discharge cycles (100% - under 20% and back), leaving a fully charged phone on the charger for extended periods... Those are the two easiest ones to follow.

    There are others, such as limiting charge to 80%, but that's tough to do most cases... I don't like to leave my house with a phone that's not fully charged... You never know what will happen. But I try to follow that if I'm just putting about the house.
    nomzamo999 likes this.
    03-15-2017 06:29 PM
  3. PookiePrancer's Avatar
    Well, you might think 16 months is quick... I don't. The way these batteries are set up, I can see them getting worn out fairly quickly... There is still a lot of bad practices that are being blessed by well known tech sites which will speed a battery to an early grave, even more quickly now that OEMs are so aggressive in how they are setting things up.
    You keep contradicting yourself. Sixteen months isn't quick, but you can see these batteries getting worn out fairly quickly?

    Sixteen months is where I'm at in my ownership. I complained to Google at just over a year, when the moron told me to reset everything, as if software fixes hardware flaws.

    Sorry, but this is the first phone I've ever owned that fried its battery that fast. I have a work iPhone 5S going on four years old, and it EASILY runs circles around the 6P in the battery department. Whatever Huawei did, it sucks, and they need to quit doing it.
    03-16-2017 12:42 PM
  4. LeoRex's Avatar
    You keep contradicting yourself. Sixteen months isn't quick, but you can see these batteries getting worn out fairly quickly?
    You misinterpret what I was saying... Based on how OEMs are configuring their batteries now, 16 months to see a fair amount of degradation isn't quick. If you had a phone for a fair amount of time before the 6P, chances are that it also came at a time when OEMs were a bit more conservative in the battery parameters, parameters that lead to better longevity. So they can treat a newer phone no different than the one that preceded it, but they are seeing the new phone die a lot quicker.

    That's what I am trying to get across. This isn't something that only Huawei is doing, it's common practice. Devices get more powerful, use more power, and design trends aren't accepting to thicker/larger phones. So many are pushing things a bit to get more capacity out of the same sized battery.
    03-16-2017 02:05 PM
  5. PookiePrancer's Avatar
    You misinterpret what I was saying... Based on how OEMs are configuring their batteries now, 16 months to see a fair amount of degradation isn't quick. If you had a phone for a fair amount of time before the 6P, chances are that it also came at a time when OEMs were a bit more conservative in the battery parameters, parameters that lead to better longevity. So they can treat a newer phone no different than the one that preceded it, but they are seeing the new phone die a lot quicker.

    That's what I am trying to get across. This isn't something that only Huawei is doing, it's common practice. Devices get more powerful, use more power, and design trends aren't accepting to thicker/larger phones. So many are pushing things a bit to get more capacity out of the same sized battery.
    Samsung Galaxy Note 5, a month older, still gets awesome battery life. Others may be doing it, but it seems like Samsung has figured something out. Whatever it is, I'm going back to the Galaxy line as soon as the S8 is available.

    Still going to try the battery swap on the Nexus though. Parts due in tomorrow.
    03-16-2017 02:35 PM
  6. LeoRex's Avatar
    Samsung Galaxy Note 5, a month older, still gets awesome battery life. Others may be doing it, but it seems like Samsung has figured something out.
    And the Note 5 had a 3000mah battery that capped its peak voltage at 4.35V. Might not seem like it, but that slight drop in max voltage will make a difference. So yes, Samsung did do things differently.

    By the way, the batteries in the S7 line have nominal peak voltages of 4.4V, but Samsung remained at 4.35V, which helps mitigate the swelling that can occur at the higher level. Phones design in a tolerance for a little bit of battery swelling, but Samsung wanted a smaller phone, which means a tighter tolerance. And if the battery swells beyond that tolerance, that would be bad. And if that happens with, say, another design issue that passed through QC unnoticed... well....
    03-16-2017 02:56 PM
  7. PookiePrancer's Avatar
    And the Note 5 had a 3000mah battery that capped its peak voltage at 4.35V. Might not seem like it, but that slight drop in max voltage will make a difference. So yes, Samsung did do things differently.

    By the way, the batteries in the S7 line have nominal peak voltages of 4.4V, but Samsung remained at 4.35V, which helps mitigate the swelling that can occur at the higher level. Phones design in a tolerance for a little bit of battery swelling, but Samsung wanted a smaller phone, which means a tighter tolerance. And if the battery swells beyond that tolerance, that would be bad. And if that happens with, say, another design issue that passed through QC unnoticed... well....
    Judging by the attention the S8 is getting, I'd put money on its safety, especially with their new battery testing regimen. They seem to be the only ones not planning on obsolescence in one year, based on what you're saying.
    03-16-2017 05:29 PM
  8. LeoRex's Avatar
    Judging by the attention the S8 is getting, I'd put money on its safety, especially with their new battery testing regimen. They seem to be the only ones not planning on obsolescence in one year, based on what you're saying.
    Well, I'm guessing that they don't push things.. we'll have to see once people get a look at the packs. iFixit will do a tear down, obviously... That'll show the spec.

    As for others.. LG appears to go to 4.4. It can be hard to find the numbers though. The rating on the actual battery can be misleading. You gotta get the value from people testing the phone.

    Still, 4.35 is still high. I am pretty sure the S3/Note 2 was 4.22V.
    03-16-2017 09:23 PM
  9. goadamn's Avatar
    I could be okay with this trash battery if the battery was removable and swappable. This casing is garbage and it's rather an infuriating ordeal
    03-22-2017 09:43 AM
  10. VAVA Mk2's Avatar
    Just replaced my battery and sure enough battery life is great again. Launch 6Ps must have come with crappy quality batteries that degraded after 16 months or so.
    03-25-2017 10:50 PM
  11. nomzamo999's Avatar
    Just replaced my battery and sure enough battery life is great again. Launch 6Ps must have come with crappy quality batteries that degraded after 16 months or so.
    How much of an ordeal was it to change the battery? I want to do it but I'm scared!
    03-26-2017 04:53 AM
  12. VAVA Mk2's Avatar
    How much of an ordeal was it to change the battery? I want to do it but I'm scared!
    I went to a local cell phone repair place at mall and asked if they would replace the battery (I didn't have a heat gun and at this point didn't want to do it myself). They custom ordered an OEM battery and I went in on Saturday morning and left them my phone for about 50 minutes. They replaced it and battery life is fantastic again. Cost for battery and labor to replace was about $70 (less than mailing to Google and have them replace since I am out of warranty). They scuffed up the bottom back plastic cover but said if I bring them a new one, they will install at no charge so bought a silver back bottom cover for about $6 on Amazon. Overall not a bad experience. You can buy the parts and do online yourself if you feel comfortable and have the proper tools. Videos on YouTube on how to do it.

    This proves there is no issue with 7.1.1 battery life bug but that about a year or a little over a year, the launch Nexus 6P batteries degraded and lost the ability to hold the charge they had before. By coincidence, this issue started appearing at the same time the 6P was getting 7.1.1.
    nomzamo999 likes this.
    03-26-2017 07:56 PM
  13. T68's Avatar
    Got my 15 month old battery replaced under warranty by contacting Huawei support i Sweden.
    Now all is well again with my otherwise fantastic 6p ๐Ÿ˜€
    VAVA Mk2 likes this.
    03-30-2017 05:27 AM
  14. nomzamo999's Avatar
    Got my 15 month old battery replaced under warranty by contacting Huawei support i Sweden.
    Now all is well again with my otherwise fantastic 6p ๐Ÿ˜€
    I like the sound of that! The device has a two year warranty, so maybe I'll try Huawei support here in the UK.
    03-30-2017 05:34 AM
  15. T68's Avatar
    I like the sound of that! The device has a two year warranty, so maybe I'll try Huawei support here in the UK.
    Yes, give it a shot. It's totally worth it to replace battery. Mine went from SoT averaging around 2:30 to almost 4:30 yesterday. That's on 3rd full charge cycle after the replacement:


    nomzamo999 likes this.
    03-31-2017 12:40 AM
  16. PGrey's Avatar
    I was looking through the phones' settings (Settings DB editor), and noticed the "low_power_threshold" is a value, set to "15%", on my 6P (and recalled reading this thread).
    I'd have to root (at least I'm pretty sure) to change it, but at least this gives some insight into the problem at the 15% threshold, and why things get so wonky at that point.
    I bet you could change this to something more "reasonable", say 8-10%
    Obviously you don't want to go to the very bottom, unless it's an emergency or similar, most current battery chemistry simply doesn't do well with being fully, or near-fully depleted.
    04-02-2017 05:35 PM
  17. PookiePrancer's Avatar
    RMA'd my phone through the insurance program. Solid battery life again. I'll probably sell it when I get the S8+ on the 21st though.
    04-03-2017 05:04 PM
  18. asnigro's Avatar
    Finally had enough with my phone lastly only 2.5 hours a day and called Google who connected me with Assurant who the Nexus Protect is managed through. Paid $79 deductable for a new phone for my wife and myself.
    04-08-2017 08:23 PM
  19. neodoc427's Avatar
    After reading this entire thread, I wanted to comment about my experience. For some unexplained reason, about three weeks ago, my Nexus 6P started consuming its battery in just a few hours after starting out with a full charge. This was without any significant change in use pattern and no new apps. I looked through the battery use chart and it said that Google Services was responsible for over 40% of battery consumption. The phone started getting very hot as well. I called Google and was told to restart the phone in Safe Mode to see if it was an app that was consuming the battery. The heat and consumption stopped, but resumed once the phone was restarted back to normal operating mode. I called Google once again and was told they would make an "exception" and replace my phone with a refurbished one. I tried to get them to replace it with a new one, but they insisted that the refurbished phones have been thoroughly tested and that they could not replace it with a new one. After too much back and forth, including a cancelled order of which I was never notified, the new order was placed for the replacement phone. However, miraculously, the phone fixed itself. It no longer gets hot and the battery is lasting the entire day as it was prior to this event. The only little glitch I see is that on several occasions, while typing a message on a text, the phone will freeze momentarily during typing. I'm wondering if I should accept the refurbished phone or just keep my now functioning Nexus 6P. I'd hate to end up with a phone that's worse than the one I have that's only a little over a year old, not to mention the hassle of reinstalling everything on the "new" one. Any thoughts?
    04-09-2017 10:46 AM
  20. nomzamo999's Avatar
    I'd go with the refurb phone if I were you. It will have been fully tested and will carry a 12 month warranty. I don't suppose there are new ones to be had, even by Google.
    PookiePrancer likes this.
    04-09-2017 11:37 AM
  21. neodoc427's Avatar
    Thanks for your suggestion. I was leaning towards accepting the refurb phone only because of the new freezing problem that's been happening since the overheating started. I suspect that the poverheating and battery drain problem may have been from 7.1.1 because after I did an update last Thursday to 7.1.2, miraculously, the battery drain problem and overheating stopped. By then, though, I had already ordered the replacement phone, so it's all good. It should arrive in the next few days. We'll see. Worst case scenario, I use Assurant and get a new phone altogether.
    04-09-2017 01:45 PM
  22. quelquehomme's Avatar
    Those are 'full' charge cycles. As was said, a partial charge is harder to judge.

    But with battery tech being used now, following best practices is more important than ever. Try to avoid deep discharge cycles (100% - under 20% and back), leaving a fully charged phone on the charger for extended periods... Those are the two easiest ones to follow.
    Sorry to revive an old thread, but I wanted to get feedback from people familiar with Accubattery.

    Is it normal for battery health stats to improve on Accubattery? The secondhand 6P I bought recently from Amazon had originally been diagnosed at 64% health by the AccuB app. About 2 weeks later, it was showing up at 60% health, which spooked me into contacting Amazon and managing to get a 20% discount off of the price of the phone. I also bought a new battery on Ebay, and put a new gold back into my Amazon shopping cart just in case.

    Two days after calling Amazon, Accubattery gives the battery a 70% rating. Two days after that, the health rating is now up to 74%! Seriously, is this credible?

    One more hard-to-swallow fact-let: I flashed the March Android O dev preview on the phone, the same weekend that I called Amazon. The phone is now running the new beta preview that was just released Wednesday afternoon (5/17). Do I contact Google and give them ad copy for Android O, or what?
    05-17-2017 11:20 PM
  23. GSDer's Avatar
    Is it normal for battery health stats to improve on Accubattery?
    I would expect some variation for the first month or two but after awhile it should settle out and remain pretty steady. Mine has been around 85% for the last year (and the daily battery life seems pretty consistent).
    05-18-2017 12:12 AM
  24. LeoRex's Avatar
    Is it normal for battery health stats to improve on Accubattery?
    Well, the estimate does improve over time. I suppose that if the battery is fairly worn, there might be a fair amount of volatility in it, but 15 points is a bunch.

    That battery is really worn BTW... the original owner must have abused the hell out of it.
    05-19-2017 08:38 AM
  25. quelquehomme's Avatar
    That battery is really worn BTW... the original owner must have abused the hell out of it.
    No kidding. I have a replacement battery at the ready just in case this thing nosedives. For now, though, it's holding steady at 74%. As long as it doesn't explode, I'm good. Sorta.
    05-19-2017 10:06 AM
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