1. bjrosen's Avatar
    In case you are wondering why the Verizon GN is so far behind all of the other carriers it's not because Verizon is just being careful it's because they hate the idea of a Nexus phone. There is a thread on Verizon's community website about the VGN being 4 releases behind everyone else. Verizon heavily censored it, bowdlerizing some posts and deleting others completely and then shutting the thread off. Verizon stated that even talking about ROMs violated their terms of service. Here is what was in the e-mail to me.

    <Post edited to comply with the Verizon Wireless Terms of Service specifically the "Posts that discuss hacking and/or rooting a wireless device from any carrier will be removed." section.>

    https://community.verizonwireless.com/message/935542

    I don't think that Verizon realized what a Nexus phone was when the offered the GN. The idea of a platform where modifying the code is not only permitted but is encouraged is anathema to them.

    I've been undecided as to whether I'd stay with them when my contract ends in December but now my mind is made up. When the Nexus 5 comes out I'll buy it directly from Google and switch to a carrier that supports it.
    02-15-2013 12:41 PM
  2. svfd757's Avatar
    In case you are wondering why the Verizon GN is so far behind all of the other carriers it's not because Verizon is just being careful it's because they hate the idea of a Nexus phone. There is a thread on Verizon's community website about the VGN being 4 releases behind everyone else. Verizon heavily censored it, bowdlerizing some posts and deleting others completely and then shutting the thread off. Verizon stated that even talking about ROMs violated their terms of service. Here is what was in the e-mail to me.

    <Post edited to comply with the Verizon Wireless Terms of Service specifically the "Posts that discuss hacking and/or rooting a wireless device from any carrier will be removed." section.>

    https://community.verizonwireless.com/message/935542

    I don't think that Verizon realized what a Nexus phone was when the offered the GN. The idea of a platform where modifying the code is not only permitted but is encouraged is anathema to them.

    I've been undecided as to whether I'd stay with them when my contract ends in December but now my mind is made up. When the Nexus 5 comes out I'll buy it directly from Google and switch to a carrier that supports it.
    They might have not known what it was. That would explain a lot

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk HD
    02-15-2013 01:57 PM
  3. Pollster's Avatar
    I don't think that Verizon realized what a Nexus phone was when the offered the GN. The idea of a platform where modifying the code is not only permitted but is encouraged is anathema to them.
    Can you point to one place where Google encourages rooting and flashing roms on Nexus devices?
    Nope. You can't.

    I can point to thousands of places users in these forums encourage it and claim that Google is way down with it, but Google only cares about what makes them money. Rooting and Romming doesn't
    02-15-2013 02:06 PM
  4. bjrosen's Avatar
    Can you point to one place where Google encourages rooting and flashing roms on Nexus devices?
    Nope. You can't.

    I can point to thousands of places users in these forums encourage it and claim that Google is way down with it, but Google only cares about what makes them money. Rooting and Romming doesn't
    The existence of AOSP is proof enough. The only thing Google has to provide sources for is the Linux kernel which is under the GPLv2, they aren't required to provide the sources for the Android layer or the GAPPs but they do. All you have to get the sources and all of the tools is to register and then check them out using git. They provide everything you need to root Nexus devices and they've made it a simple process. If they didn't want anyone to build custom versions of Android they wouldn't have provided everything you need to do it. If all they wanted was apps then those would be the only tools that they provided, that's what Apple does. Apple provides app development tools but no iOS sources and no way to root their devices.
    02-15-2013 02:30 PM
  5. Pollster's Avatar
    The existence of AOSP is proof enough. The only thing Google has to provide sources for is the Linux kernel which is under the GPLv2, they aren't required to provide the sources for the Android layer or the GAPPs but they do. All you have to get the sources and all of the tools is to register and then check them out using git. They provide everything you need to root Nexus devices and they've made it a simple process. If they didn't want anyone to build custom versions of Android they wouldn't have provided everything you need to do it. If all they wanted was apps then those would be the only tools that they provided, that's what Apple does. Apple provides app development tools but no iOS sources and no way to root their devices.
    Providing developers an open way to create Android based operating systems to sell phones is far from encouraging end users of an unrelated piece of hardware to use any non-authorized OS. Forget implicit. Lego providing me with a toy that easily fits in my nose does not mean they are encouraging me to use my son's Lego Nose-Picker.
    02-15-2013 03:23 PM
  6. 2defmouze's Avatar
    Pollster is correct. Android is open source because it encourages OEMs to use it and Google makes money by people using GApps, not from Android itself. Custom ROM development means pretty much nothing to Google.

    Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2
    02-15-2013 03:28 PM
  7. Kevin OQuinn's Avatar
    No comment

    Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2
    02-15-2013 03:32 PM
  8. Pollster's Avatar
    Oh, it means something! I'm sure they like having fanboys and creatives playing on their playground, but the bottom line on this expectation that they are encouraging anything is this.

    Your phone locks and crashes when you need to dial 911.
    You're running a custom rom.
    How do you think Google fares in court when you try to prove they encouraged you to hack your phone?

    Forgetting the legal money they have, they judge would laugh at your "evidence" that they encouraged you.
    02-15-2013 03:33 PM
  9. 2defmouze's Avatar
    Oh, it means something! I'm sure they like having fanboys and creatives playing on their playground, but the bottom line on this expectation that they are encouraging anything is this.

    Your phone locks and crashes when you need to dial 911.
    You're running a custom rom.
    How do you think Google fares in court when you try to prove they encouraged you to hack your phone?

    Forgetting the legal money they have, they judge would laugh at your "evidence" that they encouraged you.
    Yes, I agree, of course any reason that you by Android stuff is good in Google's eyes.

    Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2
    02-15-2013 03:37 PM

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