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  1. #26  

    Default Re: "Fully charged unplug charger" message?

    And you might notice, I never talked about "overcharging" at all. You can't overcharge the actual battery or drain it completely.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Android Central Forums
  2. #27  

    Default Re: "Fully charged unplug charger" message?

    You also get that message with a USB charge from your computer, it has nothing to do with a wall plug in.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Android Central Forums
  3. #28  

    Default Re: "Fully charged unplug charger" message?

    Quote Originally Posted by tvillan401 View Post
    leaving plugged in for hours and hours every day after its done charging may affect the overall life of the battery down the road I think...
    You're correct... Very true. Lithium Ion batteries life span goes by cycles. Letting it drain and then charging it fully back up is a cycle. Charging it before it is drained or leaving it plugged in for a long time after the battery reaches 100% will actually shorten the life cycle of the battery. I learned this a while ago and now I wait til my battery gets to about 15% and then take my phone off the charger once it reaches 100%

    My GS3 sleeps in the bed and I make my girlfriend sleep on the couch
    Kelly Kearns likes this.
  4. #29  

    Default Re: "Fully charged unplug charger" message?

    It is my understanding that a full cycle is just that, a full cycle. Letting it drain say, 30% then recharging to 100% is 70% of a cycle. Add to that the next charge when it's at 70% to !00% is 30% of a full cycle. So those two charges equal one full cycle.

    From

    It says, "A partial discharge reduces stress and prolongs battery life. Elevated temperature and high currents also affect cycle life."
  5. #30  

    Default Re: "Fully charged unplug charger" message?

    Although the charging circuit will stop charging the phone when it is full, leaving the battery at 100% charge ruins battery life. A Li-ion battery kept at 100% charge at 25 degrees C will lose about 15% of it's capacity over a year, whereas one kept at 60% charge will lose about 10%,regardless of charge state, it will lose more at higher temperatures. Because of this, there is a balance between the number of discharges, the depth of discharge, and the average charge capacity. It would be a very poor choice to leave your phone plugged in all the time.

    Maybe that's what this message is for? I'm not really sure why they have it though.

    This Web site is for a Nissan Leaf battery, but cell phone batteries are similar .
  6. #31  

    Default Re: "Fully charged unplug charger" message?

    Wow...A lot of conflicting advice here...

    To the OP: That icon seems to be a new feature on Samsung phones, as I also have it on my S4, and the now after the latest update the S3 has it as well. I'm pretty sure it's nothing more than a notification to let you know that your battery is fully charged...I didn't interpret the "unplug from charger" message to be *direct order*.

    The thing is that while constantly charging your device may have a negative effect on your battery's performance, that's not exactly the same thing as leaving plugged in for few hours while you sleep to charge. Today's batteries along with the technology to control the current to the battery by the phone both make it pretty safe to leave it plugged in even after a full charge without doing any damage to the phone or battery. What you want to avoid is leaving it plugged in ALL THE TIME. Like my co-worker, who used to just leave his phone plugged in on his desk all day, then went home and plugged it and left it that way all evening as well...eventually his battery wouldn't last more than 2 or 3 hours off the charger...that's what you want to avoid. I'm pretty sure you don't have to set an alarm to go off at 0230 in the morning just so you can unplug your phone when it's done charging...but then if you do charge your phone overnight, you should let it discharge during the day.
  7. #32  

    Default Re: "Fully charged unplug charger" message?

    Ok this the false information is really aggravating me now. Rolling Rock however is correct whereas Makaroni is completely wrong.
    Li-on and Li-polymer batteries should never be completely discharged or it would effectively murder the capacity, and should never be overcharged or they would explode. So chargers are designed to not overcharge the battery by stopping the charging process when the battery is at capacity. Now, the information that battery life is reduced by keeping it plugged in and the concept of what a Cycle is is whats driving me nuts. A cycle is when a battery is discharged by some amount, and then recharged, it doesn't have to be a full discharge. The percentage that it has been discharged effets how many cycles a battery can be recharged for over its life time. A battery that has been recharged after a 20% discharge over and over again vs a battery that has been discharged 50% and recharged, over and over again...the 20% discharged battery will last longer. (I can find references for this information if you really want it)

    If you keep a battery plugged in to preserve its life, technically its life should be longer than if you discharged it by some amount. (This is not factoring in heat generated) I don't really have a comment on leaving it plugged in 24/7...but wikipedia says "The software of a typical smart phone, for example, learns how to accurately gauge the battery's life by watching it discharge and leaving it on the charger produces a series of "micro discharges" that the software can watch and learn from."

    Also the degradation of lithium ion batteries is also highly dependent on heat. I don't have a comment on the heat generated from charging a battery but I just wanted to get all the misinformation about li-on batterys out of here

    High charge levels and elevated temperatures (whether from charging or ambient air) hasten capacity loss <---Straight from wikipedia.

    The need to "condition" NiCd and NiMH batteries has incorrectly leaked into folklore surrounding Li-on batteries. The recommendation for the older technologies is to leave the device plugged in for seven or eight hours, even if fully charged.[118] This may be a confusion of battery software calibration instructions with the "conditioning" instructions for NiCd and NiMH batteries.[119] The software of a typical smart phone, for example, learns how to accurately gauge the battery's life by watching it discharge and leaving it on the charger produces a series of "micro discharges" that the software can watch and learn from. <--- also wikipedia

    The last paragraph specifically addresses smart phones.
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