View Poll Results: How long until we see a custom Rom on the Kindle Fire?

Voters
94. You may not vote on this poll
  • Just a few days and we'll have true android.

    32 34.04%
  • It'll take a few weeks to break through Amazon locks.

    49 52.13%
  • Interest won't be strong and it will take a month or 2 to see any real progress.

    9 9.57%
  • Who cares? I like being locked down by the man.

    4 4.26%
  1. JeremytheIndian's Avatar
    You know it's gonna happen, but when? I think we should take bets on how many days, weeks or months it will take to crack this baby and unlock whatever extra potential there is waiting inside.
    09-28-2011 12:36 PM
  2. crescent's Avatar
    depends on how fast the cm7 devs get their hands on it. i will bet it will be record speed as i anticipate this thing to FLY off the shelves.
    09-28-2011 12:46 PM
  3. bballben's Avatar
    If Honeycomb is able to be on the Fire, what exactly will this mean and why would you do it? Sorry I am a noob when it comes to this stuff. Any chance ICS will be on it when it comes out? Thanks
    09-28-2011 02:01 PM
  4. rocktoonz's Avatar
    probably a better chance of seeing ICS than Honeycomb since Google never released the Honeycomb source.
    09-28-2011 02:59 PM
  5. PWC Realtor's Avatar
    it's hard to say especially since its been said that the fire won't have a microsd card slot or usb mass storage mode
    09-28-2011 03:02 PM
  6. Captain Spectacular's Avatar
    It's a cheap device, so hopefully not too long. CM7 seems doable as Amazon's Android spinoff is supposed to be Gingerbread-based. But then I'm no dev, so what do I know. Give it a few weeks for something stable.

    Honeycomb, not so likely. Closed-source and all that. Maybe Ice Cream in a couple of months.
    09-28-2011 03:03 PM
  7. rockstar323's Avatar
    I'm wondering how locked down it will be. I read that it uses close to the same internals as the blackberry playbook. I read an article a while back that the cost of parts for the playbook was around $200. It seems that Amazon doesn't care to make much off of the hardware and is focusing on making their money off of their software they add to it. That leads me to believe they're not going to want people to be able to easily remove it. I honestly hope that they leave it wide open and we get CM or ICS on it as soon as possible but idk.
    09-29-2011 02:37 PM
  8. frmorrison's Avatar
    It seems the Kindle Fire guys are up for people rooting it so no locked bootloader. I thought Amazon was using a forked Android before, now I know it is just the open source Android with a custom UI overlay (like Sense and TouchWiz). So it will be a few weeks and the you can get CM7 on it.

    The cost of parts for this tablet is around 200 + maybe 50 bucks for development and marketing. So Amazon is selling these at a loss but they will make up for it with content sales.
    09-29-2011 04:59 PM
  9. roberte1342's Avatar
    Who actually manufactures this device? HTC? Sammy?
    09-29-2011 05:23 PM
  10. Spiral_ouT#AC's Avatar
    I'm wondering how locked down it will be. I read that it uses close to the same internals as the blackberry playbook. I read an article a while back that the cost of parts for the playbook was around $200. It seems that Amazon doesn't care to make much off of the hardware and is focusing on making their money off of their software they add to it. That leads me to believe they're not going to want people to be able to easily remove it. I honestly hope that they leave it wide open and we get CM or ICS on it as soon as possible but idk.
    Indeed that is what the parts would cost if YOU were building it. What those "break down and price out parts" websites fail to factor in is what RIM, Amazon, or any other OEM ACTUALLY pays for the parts. When the OEM's buy components, they don't pay retail, they get a discount for buying in extremely large quantities (obvious). How much they really pay for the parts is something that the OEM is rarely willing to release. That's why the figures that those types of websites release almost always show the OEM losing money.
    09-29-2011 05:59 PM
  11. mercado79's Avatar
    it's hard to say especially since its been said that the fire won't have a microsd card slot or usb mass storage mode
    They said you'll be able to load up the device with your own music, videos, etc. So, what makes you think no mass storage mode? Will they force people to use Amazon software to transfer files over?

    It seems the Kindle Fire guys are up for people rooting it so no locked bootloader.
    Who said?

    Who actually manufactures this device? HTC? Sammy?
    It's manufactured by an ODM, Quanta. They make generic products that vendors slap their names on to....usually laptops but they do design and build tablets too (such as the Blackberry Playbook).
    09-29-2011 09:23 PM
  12. MikeTheSith200's Avatar
    I don't think Honeycomb will happen, but a Tablet optimized Gingerbread with soft home, menu, and back buttons would be great. And maybe the devs can leave the amazon apps on their so that we don't.get heat from the Big A. Maybe they can extract the apk for Amazon VOD too. As long as it runs all the apps we want , quickly, do we need a custom rom?
    09-30-2011 12:01 AM
  13. frmorrison's Avatar
    09-30-2011 12:46 AM
  14. myriad46's Avatar
    Within 12 hours of getting in the hands of a dev.
    09-30-2011 07:20 AM
  15. bjn714's Avatar
    Indeed that is what the parts would cost if YOU were building it. What those "break down and price out parts" websites fail to factor in is what RIM, Amazon, or any other OEM ACTUALLY pays for the parts. When the OEM's buy components, they don't pay retail, they get a discount for buying in extremely large quantities (obvious). How much they really pay for the parts is something that the OEM is rarely willing to release. That's why the figures that those types of websites release almost always show the OEM losing money.
    Article from ZDNet this morning with some numbers. They are usually pretty good about fact-checking.
    Amazon Kindle Fire: The math behind a subsidized tablet | ZDNet

    Now to the on-topic response, I have read the PC Mag article and from that I gather that root may happen, but as for the bootloader being unlocked, doubt it. Probably have to use some sort of bootstrap situation. Lets hope it is unlocked or can be easily hacked/patched like HTC.
    09-30-2011 12:32 PM
  16. Highdefjunkie's Avatar
    You will not see honeycomb or any other Android upgrade on the Fire. Amazon built the OS on an earlier version of Android and going forward will be developing there own OS without the help of Google.


    Christian
    kindlejunkies.com
    10-03-2011 11:39 AM
  17. bjn714's Avatar
    You will not see honeycomb or any other Android upgrade on the Fire. Amazon built the OS on an earlier version of Android and going forward will be developing there own OS without the help of Google.


    Christian
    kindlejunkies.com
    Not officially. Honeycomb, not likely ever (nor do I see the point with ICS near) since the source was not released. ICS once the source is released, it could happen. The device is still capable of running the software despite being released with an Android-based OS. It all comes down to root and a way to load it. Amazon has stated that they are not taking any specific steps to block root. What remains to be seen is what it will take to root it and whether or not we can install a custom recovery or will have to use a bootstrapping method. In either case, unless the OS is VERY secure, it will happen at some point. If devs can get CM7 running on a Touchpad, this should be less difficult as there is much less hardware that needs working drivers and libs - no gps, cell radio, microphone, camera, etc.

    It will happen.
    10-03-2011 12:16 PM
  18. placeman's Avatar
    I read that with that TI chip, Amazon could make it pretty difficult to unlock it if they wanted to. That's not to say a group of savvy devs aren't up to the task.
    10-04-2011 10:06 AM
  19. drd1135#AC's Avatar
    Jon Jenkins, the Silk director, says Amazon won't try to stop anyone from rooting the fire. he said something like "We can't stop anyone from rooting the Fire, and then it's their problem."
    10-05-2011 08:29 PM
  20. freeky1's Avatar
    Why do people always want to get something for nothing? If you want a real Android tablet buy one. Don't expect the Fire to ever be a real Android tablet. It was never meant to be one.

    Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk
    10-08-2011 10:22 PM
  21. campanth's Avatar
    Why do people always want to get something for nothing? If you want a real Android tablet buy one. Don't expect the Fire to ever be a real Android tablet. It was never meant to be one.

    Sent from my Xoom using Tapatalk
    Well said... If it doesn't work for you...don't buy it. There are several other 7" tablets on the market for just a little bit more money than the Kindle Fire. If the limited storage (8GB) or the lack of the Google Market is a show stopper for you, buy something else. I think the Fire is a great device for $200, especially if you have already bought in to Amazon's ecosystem, but it is certainly not for everyone.
    10-10-2011 10:25 AM
  22. Asaroth2010's Avatar
    Why Don't we wait till it makes it out in the market before trying to mess with it??
    10-10-2011 06:12 PM
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