1. jasonvancouver's Avatar
    Hi everyone - I have the Droid Incredible.

    I was surprised when I downloaded the "NPR" App and the "Secrets" App
    ( a password app that protects info on the Incredible). Both Apps ( and others, I believe) wanted access to :

    1. Your location - which seems fine

    2. Network Communications - obviously needed

    3. Phone calls - read phone state and identity ??

    I believe I have seen this permission request on other apps. I have downloaded or have updated.

    Why would an app. want to be able to see item #3 above ?

    These are reputable apps., so I was surprised to see this.

    Can anyone shed some light ? There must be a reason... perhaps to send me ads based on where I live, etc ?
    06-28-2010 06:32 PM
  2. Kyle Gibb's Avatar
    I would assume at least for the NPR one that it would stop playing NPR while you are taking/making a phone call. Not sure about secrets though.
    06-28-2010 06:39 PM
  3. Brett's Avatar
    the reason is (from my knowledge) to make sure that if you are using the app and the phone rings that it will be able to recognize the phone call and pop up. it is a standard permission it seems with apps in the market. i am not 100% positive but i know i have read it in a few other threads and blogs explaining it. it's more or less there to let phone calls come through while you are on the phone.
    jasonvancouver likes this.
    06-28-2010 07:37 PM
  4. Kyle Gibb's Avatar
    the reason is (from my knowledge) to make sure that if you are using the app and the phone rings that it will be able to recognize the phone call and pop up. it is a standard permission it seems with apps in the market. i am not 100% positive but i know i have read it in a few other threads and blogs explaining it. it's more or less there to let phone calls come through while you are on the phone.
    Having some understanding of how Android works, this seems very likely.
    06-29-2010 01:06 AM
  5. takeshi's Avatar
    Phone calls - read phone state and identity ??
    With all of these warnings you need to read beyond just the short description of the permissions if you're trying to understand why a specific permission is requested. The name doesn't always tell you everything.

    From How to be safe, find trusted apps, & avoid viruses - A guide for those new to Android - Android Forums
    Phone calls
    read phone state and identity
    This permission is of moderate to high importance. Unfortunately this permission seems to be a bit of a mixed bag. While it's perfectly normal for an application to want to know if you are on the phone or getting a call, this permission also gives an application access to 3 unique numbers that can identify your phone. The numbers are the IMEI, IMSI and a 64 bit unique id that Google provides for your phone. Some software developers use this as a means of tracking piracy. Additionally, any developer targeting older versions of android (1.6 and earlier I believe) will get this permission automatically added to their app. Nevertheless, while this permission can be innocuous, it is one to keep a good watch on. As someone posted in this thread the application Locale was caught sending this information over the internet unencrypted to a third party -- much to to the surprise of it's users.
    jasonvancouver and PvilleComp like this.
    06-29-2010 09:21 AM
  6. jasonvancouver's Avatar
    the reason is (from my knowledge) to make sure that if you are using the app and the phone rings that it will be able to recognize the phone call and pop up. it is a standard permission it seems with apps in the market. i am not 100% positive but i know i have read it in a few other threads and blogs explaining it. it's more or less there to let phone calls come through while you are on the phone.
    With all of these warnings you need to read beyond just the short description of the permissions if you're trying to understand why a specific permission is requested. The name doesn't always tell you everything.

    From How to be safe, find trusted apps, & avoid viruses - A guide for those new to Android - Android Forums
    Thanks guys, that makes sense. I have seen this app. permission, I believe with several of the apps. I have installed. I can't imagine NPR having malicious intent. However, it is probably a good thing to be aware of. So, I think the take away point is that it is ok, but know what you are consenting to.

    By the way, are Droid phones such as the incredible subject to viruses??...like our PC's. I was told my old BB Curve was not, because it would not accept EXE
    ( executable) files.
    06-29-2010 07:48 PM
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