1. droideilhan's Avatar
    Hi there,

    Today we are pleased to announce the release of our new Android application: Ultra Simple Task Killer

    Ultra Simple Task Killer is a WIDGET that does only one thing but does it well.

    US Task Killer kills all unwanted processes and saves your battery IN ONE CLICK. For greater stability, some "system" processes (system, acore, phone, ...) are not killed.

    Features:
    * Kills all unwanted processes on your phone
    * Locales : english, french, spanish, italian
    * Need to be running Android 1.5 or later

    And don't forget to check out our other great apps.



    Available on the Android Market.
    QR code:


    Enjoy!

    Regards,

    droideilhan
    08-19-2010 02:41 PM
  2. moosc's Avatar
    Will this work on 2.2 Froyo? Since TKs are not supported.
    08-19-2010 03:02 PM
  3. meyerweb#CB's Avatar
    All "unwanted" processes?

    Who defines unwanted? You, or me?
    08-19-2010 09:26 PM
  4. WAldenIV's Avatar
    Task killers do more harm than good.
    08-19-2010 09:40 PM
  5. terpitude71's Avatar
    ultra simple...till it starts borking my device? thanks, but no
    08-19-2010 10:25 PM
  6. bcbbanga4l's Avatar
    Someone try this let me know lolz maybe i will.
    08-19-2010 10:32 PM
  7. rjdangerous's Avatar
    This is not true.

    Task killers do more harm than good.
    08-20-2010 04:16 AM
  8. SeeK's Avatar
    Task killers do more harm than good.
    Agreed. Android does not equal Windows and its crappy and outdated task management principals.
    08-20-2010 05:38 AM
  9. meyerweb#CB's Avatar
    Task managers have their place, but automatically killing lots of background processes WILL do more harm than good. Especially on devices with 2.0 or above. I suggest anyone using, or considering, a task manager do two things:

    1) read this article: http://www.androidcentral.com/how-pr...s-i-went-there

    2) don't let the task killer choose what processes and apps to kill. Understand what each app you're going to kill does. If you don't know what it does, leave it alone.

    3) If using a task killer really makes a big difference in your battery life, one (or more) of the apps you're killing is is poorly designed and written, and should be tossed. That will be far more effective in the long run than using an automated task killer.
    08-20-2010 07:31 AM
  10. Clemsonpablo's Avatar
    Why can't I just have control over my phone? Why do a bulk of the programs still not offer "exit" or "quit" options. I mean, if people would code their programs correctly, then we probably wouldn't need task killers, but in the mean time we need some way to be able to easily control what's going on.
    08-20-2010 08:07 AM
  11. meyerweb#CB's Avatar
    If you understood how Android works, you'd realize you don't NEED to exit these apps. Inactive apps use no CPU, and the fact that they sit in memory uses no battery. RAM is refreshed constantly, whether it contains data or contains all zeros or contains null. No data is just another form of data.

    Unlike Windows or BB, Android will reuse memory occupied by inactive apps when it needs it. Android itself is a task killer, but a smart one. It never kills tasks that are needed, it only kills tasks that are unneeded, and it only kills them when it needs the memory.

    An example: Let's say you start up a calculator app. When you exit the app, Android leaves it in memory. If you then realize you want to use it again, it's already loaded, and starts immediately. If the app were unloaded from memory, and you decided to use it again, you'd have to wait while Android copies it from Flash memory into RAM so it can execute. Not only does that slow things down, it uses MORE cpu and battery than just leaving it sit in RAM does.

    Take the opposite case: the calculator sits in RAM, and you don't use it again. Sometime later, you start a new program that needs that RAM to execute. No problem, Android closes out the calculator app and loads your new program.

    Having a bunch of "empty" memory was necessary to Windows. It provide no benefit at all to Android. The simple truth is that Android is a much better task and memory manager than any third party task killer. Let it work as it's supposed to.
    08-20-2010 08:19 AM
  12. Clemsonpablo's Avatar
    If you understood how Android works, you'd realize you don't NEED to exit these apps. Inactive apps use no CPU, and the fact that they sit in memory uses no battery. RAM is refreshed constantly, whether it contains data or contains all zeros or contains null. No data is just another form of data.

    Unlike Windows or BB, Android will reuse memory occupied by inactive apps when it needs it. Android itself is a task killer, but a smart one. It never kills tasks that are needed, it only kills tasks that are unneeded, and it only kills them when it needs the memory.

    An example: Let's say you start up a calculator app. When you exit the app, Android leaves it in memory. If you then realize you want to use it again, it's already loaded, and starts immediately. If the app were unloaded from memory, and you decided to use it again, you'd have to wait while Android copies it from Flash memory into RAM so it can execute. Not only does that slow things down, it uses MORE cpu and battery than just leaving it sit in RAM does.

    Take the opposite case: the calculator sits in RAM, and you don't use it again. Sometime later, you start a new program that needs that RAM to execute. No problem, Android closes out the calculator app and loads your new program.

    Having a bunch of "empty" memory was necessary to Windows. It provide no benefit at all to Android. The simple truth is that Android is a much better task and memory manager than any third party task killer. Let it work as it's supposed to.
    That's all well and good, however, many apps DO keep RUNNING in the background when the home button is pressed. Why am I not allowed to see what these guys are really eating and make a judgement about whether I want to allow them to reside. Right now I have no way of knowing what's eating and tasking on the processor, so I can't discern between benign apps that may be just sitting there, and ones that are eating processor time/battery/memory. Seeing as (on my phone, the DX) things start to get sluggish around 50mb free, why don't I have the option to clear out apps (and bloatware) that I will not be needing any time soon to assure that I will have enough RAM for things that I WANT to run smooth and fast?
    08-20-2010 08:43 AM
  13. prubin's Avatar
    Again, does this work with 2.2?
    08-20-2010 11:11 AM
  14. rjdangerous's Avatar
    But what if I want to? Hate when I open an app and it's where I left off. Especially the browser.

    If you understood how Android works, you'd realize you don't NEED to exit these apps. Inactive apps use no CPU, and the fact that they sit in memory uses no battery. RAM is refreshed constantly, whether it contains data or contains all zeros or contains null. No data is just another form of data.

    Unlike Windows or BB, Android will reuse memory occupied by inactive apps when it needs it. Android itself is a task killer, but a smart one. It never kills tasks that are needed, it only kills tasks that are unneeded, and it only kills them when it needs the memory.

    An example: Let's say you start up a calculator app. When you exit the app, Android leaves it in memory. If you then realize you want to use it again, it's already loaded, and starts immediately. If the app were unloaded from memory, and you decided to use it again, you'd have to wait while Android copies it from Flash memory into RAM so it can execute. Not only does that slow things down, it uses MORE cpu and battery than just leaving it sit in RAM does.

    Take the opposite case: the calculator sits in RAM, and you don't use it again. Sometime later, you start a new program that needs that RAM to execute. No problem, Android closes out the calculator app and loads your new program.

    Having a bunch of "empty" memory was necessary to Windows. It provide no benefit at all to Android. The simple truth is that Android is a much better task and memory manager than any third party task killer. Let it work as it's supposed to.
    08-20-2010 02:49 PM
  15. prubin's Avatar
    Also, I may want to keep; some apps running and not others. I read books on the Evo and often want to keep that app open and close others, but the OS may decide to kill the book.

    Is there any app killer that works on 2.2?
    08-20-2010 03:02 PM
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