1. Android Central Question's Avatar
    Hi. I'll try and be brief.

    Upgraded from Note 4>Note9, my first phone without removable battery. Intend to
    keep it for many years if possible (I'm not spending £900 every year!)

    I understand to get best overall lifespan I should top up a little and often and avoid 100% and 0% scenarios as much as possible. That seems to be consensus. I'm fine with that.

    Conflicting advice:

    Some say "Make sure you use the charger which comes with your phone as it's designed for the battery". Others say: Avoid rapid charging if longevity is your top priority (which it is)

    My options:

    Charge at 800mA with my trusty old Samsung charger from my Galaxy Ace
    Charge at 1800mA with the Note's adaptive charger and the "Fast Charging" set to off
    Charge at 2400mA with "Fast Charging" set to on

    Please do not reply "It doesn't matter, get over it!", because it DOES to me. If I can get an extra 3 months out of this expensive device by looking after it properly, I'm very happy to. I suspect, as a cynic, that mobile phone companies couldn't give a stuff about your device's lifespan as their priority is to sell you the Note 11, or whatever in two years at the latest!

    Thanks so much for reading my post!

    Nigel Foster
    10-26-2018 02:57 AM
  2. B. Diddy's Avatar
    Welcome to Android Central! Probably the best thing to do is to avoid letting the battery drop below 30-40% on a regular basis. If you really want to adhere to the battery experts' advice, you could also limit the maximum charge to about 80%, but that tends make real world usage of your phone a little tedious. I typically let it charge to 100%, and then recharge when I'm down to around 30%.

    Fast charging theoretically puts more stress on the battery, so if fast charging isn't important to you, then slow charging might prolong the battery's lifespan overall. I'm not sure if there will be any appreciable difference between using the old Ace charger vs your Note9's charger with Fast Charging turned off.

    Avoid temperature extremes (especially high ambient temps). So never leave your phone in your car on a hot day.

    If you plan on storing your phone for a while without using it, do so at a battery level of around 50%.
    10-26-2018 03:07 AM
  3. Pog1's Avatar
    Thanks for the time you gave for the advice. I appreciate it and take it on board. I find it amazing that such an important issue is so poorly understood generally, and that there is so much conflicting advice going on. We've had L-ion for a LONG time now. I would have thought the science would be pretty black and white. It appears the majority of people have kind of accepted that their expensive phones wear out after a couple of years. What a tragedy. When I think of all that hi tech gadgetry packed into a beautiful package - and I'm expected to toss it away like a disused baked bean can after 24 month. This is absolutely nuts. IS it possible to replace the battery in such devices? Is it expensive? Ignore this supplementary question if it's a matter for a separate post!

    Thanks again for your interest.
    10-26-2018 05:26 AM
  4. Kodak2's Avatar
    It's not just the battery failing that limits the life of your phone. Lack of security updates after year 2 from release and updated apps that are no longer compatible are a big factor in how long you keep your phone.
    10-26-2018 06:05 AM
  5. Mooncatt's Avatar
    I find it amazing that such an important issue is so poorly understood generally, and that there is so much conflicting advice going on. We've had L-ion for a LONG time now. I would have thought the science would be pretty black and white.
    The science is pretty black and white.

    https://batteryuniversity.com/index....ased_batteries

    The issue with phones is partly because we never use to have to worry much about it. If the battery went bad, it was cheap and easy to replace. There wasn't much of a reason to take care of it. Then there's also a lot of hold over practices that applied to Ni-Cad batteries that phones use to have, and many people just assumed Li-ion batteries needed the same treatment.

    There is also simply the issue of convenience. The 40-80% guideline is just that. It's not a hard and fast rule, and is a suggestion to balance all the variables. It may or may not apply to you, depending on your specific needs, and some people just don't want to be bothered with it. If someone is the type to trade in often, then battery care isn't going to be near as important to them as it is to you.

    You answer your other questions:

    The charger doesn't matter much, other than the possibility of not being able to charge if it's not strong enough. I'm personally ok with adaptive fast charging. In general, a Li-ion battery can be charged at a rate equal to its capacity. The Note 9 has a 4,000mAh battery, so it should handle a 4,000mA (4A) charge rate without any appreciable degradation. Even in fast charge mode, the charger isn't going to give that much current. As long as you're not doing anything intensive that builds up extra heat while charging, such as playing a game, then you should be fine there.

    Sealed batteries are replaceable, but usually not by the consumer. It requires special tools to get the phone apart, plus delicate handling of the internals to not damage anything. Often times manufacturers now glue things together, adding to the difficulty. I think I read a comment somewhere her that the Note 9 is one of the worst for getting at the battery. Repair shops may be able to do it, or you could send it to Samsung. Either way, the cost and inconvenience is considerably worse than a traditional style battery. I don't have an exact idea on that, though, because I only use phones with removable batteries for those reasons. Also, of the 3 phones I did try with a sealed battery, they all had a catastrophic failure of the battery that left me with a brick until I could exchange them. So I personally loathe the concept.
    B. Diddy likes this.
    10-26-2018 06:38 AM
  6. Pog1's Avatar
    Thanks Mooncat. Read and replied to your reply last week but it seems to have disapper ed. Appreciate you sharing your wisdom. Did read an article by Accubattery challenging many of the assertions in the Battery University article which is what led to my comment about black and white.
    11-05-2018 04:58 PM
  7. Ten Four's Avatar
    I just go all day, plug my phone in at night, let it charge all night, and then go all day long again. Once in awhile when I have been using the Pixel 2 an unusual amount I have to recharge before the end of the day, but almost never. Have done this with smartphones for years and have never had serious battery issues. I think the #1 thing is to avoid depleting all the way and then leaving uncharged or undercharged. Otherwise, it is very hard to damage them by leaving on a charge. Batteries are self-limiting in the amount of charge they can take, so overcharging is not usually an issue. Unfortunately, I think the planned lifespan of a smartphone is about 2 years, and we all should plan on that being the limit. Figure that into all your calculations about cost and you will be happier. If you get more than 2 years out of a phone consider that bonus time.
    11-05-2018 05:04 PM
  8. Mooncatt's Avatar
    Otherwise, it is very hard to damage them by leaving on a charge. Batteries are self-limiting in the amount of charge they can take, so overcharging is not usually an issue.
    Overcharging isn't the issue. It's being held at a high state of charge, which is above 75% state of charge.
    11-05-2018 06:28 PM

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