1. sloked's Avatar
    Not sure if it is a grounding issue, or the lack of a power brick, but have you felt the vibrations the metal gives off when it is charging? Slide your fingers across anywhere metal on the keyboard dock while plugged in and it will buzz like, well like something that buzzes.
    cagemarrow likes this.
    06-26-2011 05:09 AM
  2. Ronindan's Avatar
    Not sure if it is a grounding issue, or the lack of a power brick, but have you felt the vibrations the metal gives off when it is charging? Slide your fingers across anywhere metal on the keyboard dock while plugged in and it will buzz like, well like something that buzzes.
    I have the same thing, however I find that the vibration or buzz disaappers after a couple seconds. I never been shocked though.

    "Be as smart as you can, but remember that it is always better to be wise than to be smart. Alan Alda"
    06-26-2011 08:48 AM
  3. bassmanr's Avatar
    I have the same thing, however I find that the vibration or buzz disaappers after a couple seconds. I never been shocked though.

    "Be as smart as you can, but remember that it is always better to be wise than to be smart. Alan Alda"
    The "Buzz" you feel is just the feeling of your finger skipping across the anodized surface. Your fingers tend to skip in very, very small steps when just the right conditions exist.
    This is normal behavior for anodized surfaces and is NOT and electrical condition.

    TheBassman
    07-16-2011 07:36 PM
  4. vicw926a4's Avatar
    I can measure an AC voltage between my TF frame and ground on the wall receptacle of about 90 volts, while the charger is connected.

    If I reverse the connection at the receptacle, the voltage drops to about 8 volts. Others have reported similar voltages between 80 to 90, and 8 to 9 volts, depending on the plug position.

    I was initially quite alarmed at the possible safety implications of the voltage, but have slowly come to the conclusion that since the adapter lacks a ground connection, a very small leakage current to one or another of the inputs is injecting the AC component riding on top of the 15 v DC, and that the apparent high voltage has a miniscule current capacity, and is most likely not hazardous. Also, I never really use the TF with the charger connected.

    I created a support ticket on this to ASUS, but their response, after several weeks, was not helpful. They suggested that I just had a defective adapter and to RMA it back to them. I really suspect that the problem is likely to be universal with this adapter, and since it is working, I'll live with it for now.



    Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk
    07-17-2011 12:06 AM
  5. sheureka's Avatar
    The first power adapters had a leak problem when they were inserted the wrong way. That doesn't seem true with the later ones. - sheureka
    07-20-2011 01:14 PM
  6. vicw926a4's Avatar
    The first power adapters had a leak problem when they were inserted the wrong way. That doesn't seem true with the later ones. - sheureka
    I have new one on order, and I hope to soon be able to confirm that it is true that the problem doesn't exist on newer adapters.

    There really isn't a "wrong" or "right" way to plug the adapter into the wall socket, in fact the higher voltage is present when the adapter is plugged in with the ASUS logo right side up, assuming the receptacle is oriented in the common manner, with its ground connection physically below the neutral and hot prongs. A number of others have also reported this same behavior with the model OB-1LF adapter. Has the model name been changed on the improved version?

    Sent from my DROIDX using Tapatalk
    07-20-2011 01:32 PM
  7. lynette's Avatar
    Mine does this sometimes, but not always. So I disagree with post #3, or it would always be present.
    07-23-2011 10:35 PM
  8. vicw926a4's Avatar
    Mine does this sometimes, but not always. So I disagree with post #3, or it would always be present.
    I agree. After measuring 90 v AC on my ASUS frame to receptacle ground, I'm pretty confident that the voltage is real, at least on my unit.
    07-23-2011 10:43 PM
  9. jerrykur's Avatar
    Mine does this sometimes, but not always. So I disagree with post #3, or it would always be present.
    The posts on XDA indicate it is an issue with the polarity of the socket. Assuming you are in North America, try looking at the plug and noting if Asus is right side up or up side down when plug into a wall socket with the ground plug on the bottom. If it is right side up the polarity is reversed and shows the current bleed reference in post #3.
    lynette likes this.
    07-24-2011 02:38 PM
  10. vicw926a4's Avatar
    I received a new AC adapter from ExcaliberPC.com today, and tested the AC voltage injection from it vs. the original one I got back in May. The new one is a Type 0B-2LF vs. the original 0B-1LF.

    Both of the adapters behave the same way. Each injects between 80-90v AC on my digital meter to the ASUS frame with the plug inserted with the ASUS logo upright and readable, and 6-8v AC with the plug reversed. As I suspected, this problem is not unique to my original unit, as ASUS had suggested, and newer units have apparently not eliminated this problem. I have no way to prove it, of course, but I suspect that any of the adapters will behave in the same way, at least up through Type 0B-2LF.

    Despite the scary implications of that high AC voltage, I believe that the current-carrying capability of the injected AC is miniscule, and not likely to cause harm. Other than this behavior, which certainly would explain the mild shocks that folks have reported, the chargers are performing properly for me. I can't say I'm happy about it, but I'm just going to live with it, taking the precaution to always plug it in with the ASUS upside down.
    07-29-2011 10:35 AM
  11. vicw926a4's Avatar
    The posts on XDA indicate it is an issue with the polarity of the socket. Assuming you are in North America, try looking at the plug and noting if Asus is right side up or up side down when plug into a wall socket with the ground plug on the bottom. If it is right side up the polarity is reversed and shows the current bleed reference in post #3.
    I don't disagree with the advantage of plugging the adapter in as you suggest, but you might want to re-read Post #3. The contention in that post was that it isn't an electrical issue, which just isn't the case.
    07-29-2011 10:39 AM
  12. charlibob's Avatar
    Readings like this are common when measuring this sort of phenomena with relatively high impedance meters. If you go around your homes or offices and perform similar tests, you will likely find that many pieces of equipment give similar readings. As several others have suggested, the current involved is unlikely sufficient to pose a hazard.
    07-29-2011 11:04 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD