11-23-2016 02:22 PM
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  1. murphcid's Avatar
    I just don't get the point of chrome books. A crippled device the cannot work unless you have an Internet connection, and can't run any real programs such as photoshop, libre office, word, etc. 16 gb of storage, 2gb of ram, less useful than a decent Windows laptop. What is the point of these devices? A real laptop and tab s2 does it all.
    11-03-2015 07:46 PM
  2. B. Diddy's Avatar
    This has been discussed many times on the forums before. I'm a big fan of Chromebooks, because like the vast majority of computer users, I do almost all of my computer activity in a browser. That includes work (remote access of my hospital's electronic charting system via Citrix), productivity (Google Docs/Sheets), leisure (Google Play Music, Google Play Movies, especially when casting to a Chromecast), and AC forum activity. Although I do have a Windows 10 PC, I do about 98% of computer activity on the Chromebook. Here's a rundown on things I like about it:

    1. Fast and lightweight: Recent Chromebooks perform well, because there are no unnecessary Windows processes bogging things down. It literally boots up in 7 seconds, and I'm ready to start working in about 15 seconds. Chromebooks that have the better processors (like Haswell or Broadwell), along with 4 GB of RAM, can function smoothly with many open tabs.

    2. Tight integration with Google services: I'm all in with Google, and Chromebooks make it easy to access your Google Drive (as if it were just another hard drive on the system), along with all other Google services.

    3. Security: No need for antivirus/security programs, which often bog down Windows PCs. In addition, if I lose my Chromebook, I can rest assured that no one else can access my sensitive data, since it's all in the cloud. All I have to do is change my Google password.

    4. Value: You can get an excellent Chromebook brand new for under $300, and refurbished under $200. My 15" full HD Acer Chromebook with 4 GB of RAM and a fast Broadwell processor was just $179. Any comparably priced Windows laptop will lag behind significantly in performance.

    5. Battery life: Most Chromebooks will go at least 6-8 hours on a single charge, which is hard to find on a similarly priced Windows laptop.

    6. Fast system updates: While a system update is downloading in the background, I only notice the faintest of hiccups. Installation of the update is as simple as rebooting, which again takes 7 seconds. Compare this to Windows PCs, which can take upwards of 30 to 60 minutes to complete multiple updates (longer if you haven't used it in a little while).


    Regarding your specific concerns:

    1. Chromebooks can in fact do a lot while offline. Documents and photos can be edited, music and movies can be played (if downloaded or cached beforehand). It's true that you can't browse without an internet connection, but that of course applies to PCs as well. These days, most people will use whatever laptop they have where there's a wi-fi connection, and if there isn't, that's what your phone's hotspot is for.

    2. There usually is not a need to run a "real" program if the same thing can be achieved on the web. I don't need Word or Libre Office because Google Docs and Sheets do what I need (and I would guess that most people who have Microsoft Office use only about 15% of its features overall anyway). Photoshop is a common criticism, but (a) there are good web-based photo editing sites like Pixlr, (b) Adobe is working on a Photoshop for Chromebooks (https://edex.adobe.com/projectphotoshopstreaming), and (c) the full Photoshop PC program is so huge and resource-consuming that you'd need a much more expensive high end PC to get any decent use out of it. Running high end games is definitely a weak point of Chromebooks, but then again, you're not going to play high end games on a cheap Windows laptop either.

    3. Tablets aren't a good replacement for a Chromebook if you're interested in doing a lot of web browsing, because no matter how powerful the Android tablet is, the browser will always be slower than Chrome on a PC or Chromebook.

    That being said, can a Chromebook completely replace a PC? No, which is why I still (reluctantly) have my big clunky Windows PC sitting on my desk. The main time I fire it up these days is to download a podcast on iTunes that I can't find anywhere else (don't get me started on iTunes ). Still, slowly but surely, the things I used to rely on the PC for are being taken care of in the cloud. I uploaded my entire photo library to Google Photos, so I have no real need to store them on the hard drive as well. My entire music library has also been uploaded to Google Play Music.

    Are Chromebooks for everyone? No, but I would argue that many many people would find them quite useful. You sound like your mind's already made up, but if you ever get a chance, try spending a few weeks playing around with one---you might end up being pleasantly surprised.
    11-04-2015 01:22 AM
  3. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    Well things like a Chromebook or Surface Pro aren't going to take the place of a computer.

    I don't have a Chromebook, but I don't use desktops anymore, just laptops. That being said, there is very little I do on my computer that I don't need an Internet connection for.
    11-04-2015 06:20 AM
  4. murphcid's Avatar
    Thank you for that excellent post. Good points on all areas. I disagree with the Cloud storage security, since I think it is inherently insecure compared to local storage (encrypted). Too many Hollywierd celebutants are getting their sex tapes hacked and placed on the net. Heck even the CIA directors emails were hacked. My kids schools are pushing chromebooks for the kids, but I just can't bring myself to spring for essentially another tablet. Google docs are good, but the school then decides to make you get Microsoft Publisher! That is why I need Libre Office since the DRAW program will edit Publisher files. *sigh* I wish they would stick with one platform.


    This has been discussed many times on the forums before. I'm a big fan of Chromebooks, because like the vast majority of computer users, I do almost all of my computer activity in a browser. That includes work (remote access of my hospital's electronic charting system via Citrix), productivity (Google Docs/Sheets), leisure (Google Play Music, Google Play Movies, especially when casting to a Chromecast), and AC forum activity. Although I do have a Windows 10 PC, I do about 98% of computer activity on the Chromebook. Here's a rundown on things I like about it:

    1. Fast and lightweight: Recent Chromebooks perform well, because there are no unnecessary Windows processes bogging things down. It literally boots up in 7 seconds, and I'm ready to start working in about 15 seconds. Chromebooks that have the better processors (like Haswell or Broadwell), along with 4 GB of RAM, can function smoothly with many open tabs.

    2. Tight integration with Google services: I'm all in with Google, and Chromebooks make it easy to access your Google Drive (as if it were just another hard drive on the system), along with all other Google services.

    3. Security: No need for antivirus/security programs, which often bog down Windows PCs. In addition, if I lose my Chromebook, I can rest assured that no one else can access my sensitive data, since it's all in the cloud. All I have to do is change my Google password.

    4. Value: You can get an excellent Chromebook brand new for under $300, and refurbished under $200. My 15" full HD Acer Chromebook with 4 GB of RAM and a fast Broadwell processor was just $179. Any comparably priced Windows laptop will lag behind significantly in performance.

    5. Battery life: Most Chromebooks will go at least 6-8 hours on a single charge, which is hard to find on a similarly priced Windows laptop.

    6. Fast system updates: While a system update is downloading in the background, I only notice the faintest of hiccups. Installation of the update is as simple as rebooting, which again takes 7 seconds. Compare this to Windows PCs, which can take upwards of 30 to 60 minutes to complete multiple updates (longer if you haven't used it in a little while).


    Regarding your specific concerns:

    1. Chromebooks can in fact do a lot while offline. Documents and photos can be edited, music and movies can be played (if downloaded or cached beforehand). It's true that you can't browse without an internet connection, but that of course applies to PCs as well. These days, most people will use whatever laptop they have where there's a wi-fi connection, and if there isn't, that's what your phone's hotspot is for.

    2. There usually is not a need to run a "real" program if the same thing can be achieved on the web. I don't need Word or Libre Office because Google Docs and Sheets do what I need (and I would guess that most people who have Microsoft Office use only about 15% of its features overall anyway). Photoshop is a common criticism, but (a) there are good web-based photo editing sites like Pixlr, (b) Adobe is working on a Photoshop for Chromebooks (https://edex.adobe.com/projectphotoshopstreaming), and (c) the full Photoshop PC program is so huge and resource-consuming that you'd need a much more expensive high end PC to get any decent use out of it. Running high end games is definitely a weak point of Chromebooks, but then again, you're not going to play high end games on a cheap Windows laptop either.

    3. Tablets aren't a good replacement for a Chromebook if you're interested in doing a lot of web browsing, because no matter how powerful the Android tablet is, the browser will always be slower than Chrome on a PC or Chromebook.

    That being said, can a Chromebook completely replace a PC? No, which is why I still (reluctantly) have my big clunky Windows PC sitting on my desk. The main time I fire it up these days is to download a podcast on iTunes that I can't find anywhere else (don't get me started on iTunes ). Still, slowly but surely, the things I used to rely on the PC for are being taken care of in the cloud. I uploaded my entire photo library to Google Photos, so I have no real need to store them on the hard drive as well. My entire music library has also been uploaded to Google Play Music.

    Are Chromebooks for everyone? No, but I would argue that many many people would find them quite useful. You sound like your mind's already made up, but if you ever get a chance, try spending a few weeks playing around with one---you might end up being pleasantly surprised.
    B. Diddy and ackmondual like this.
    11-05-2015 06:47 AM
  5. B. Diddy's Avatar
    I agree with you about the inherent (but I still think very small) risk of security breaches, and I don't store very sensitive material in the cloud (like password lists). Local hard drive storage is certainly more secure, but there is always the spectre of drive failure, so I'd advised keeping backups of very important data on at least one other physical hard drive.
    11-05-2015 11:00 AM
  6. Steve Adams's Avatar
    With a chromebook you can still use an external HD to store documents as well. Don't forget that point. I am going to florida again soon and I am planning to pick up a Pixel 2 while I'm down there. Will make a great unit to coexist with my surface 3 main system. I was deciding what android phone to use, I think the blackberry priv is my new android phone. I have a small lepan android tablet and while its running an older version of android it works great for my needs.

    I am a windows/Microsoft user first. I love their products and how their system works.....but I also like the way google is going now too..
    B. Diddy likes this.
    11-06-2015 04:33 AM
  7. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    I mean people have to remember.. This just can't replace a computer, but has its place.

    Anything I put on the cloud is expendable and not secret, no matter how strong my cloud password is.

    External hard drives are so cheap and I use one for my computers also, for back up. Really important things are printed and scanned on disk and put in a fireproof small safe, that can't be removed.

    Your computer can be fine one second and the computer experts can't get the info off the next second, I've lived that. Same with your external hard drive, there is also the possibility of theft.
    11-06-2015 07:34 AM
  8. murphcid's Avatar
    True that is why I have 5 tb of storage and back up across those disks. I can't afford to lose my photos due to a disk failure. One of those disks is an external 2 tb drive.
    11-06-2015 09:27 AM
  9. B. Diddy's Avatar
    This just can't replace a computer, but has its place.
    This is me tooting the Chromebook horn again, but for me, it's getting verrrrrrry close to completely replacing my PC. It depends on what a user needs in a computer. We should keep in mind that Chrome OS is not static--it is constantly evolving, with system updates being pushed out about once every month or so.
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    11-06-2015 11:18 AM
  10. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    Running Windows is not what determines if something can replace a traditional computer and I don't care what keyboard you get, not the same at all. I generally use a wireless, full keyboard with my laptop and need it. A Surface Pro keyboard can't handle my typing.

    I also need an actual, internal DVD drive on my computers.

    YMMV
    Laura Knotek likes this.
    11-06-2015 03:14 PM
  11. Steve Adams's Avatar
    I have the dock for our surfaces. My wife wants to use the 27" monitor and keyboard and mouse, she docks her surface. I want to do some photo editing, store our photos on our server using the 27" monitor keyboard and mouse I just dock in. The surface is a killer device. And the pro 4 is crazy awesome with its top end specs.

    I think chromebooks are a viable Main computer now, after using the demo on my acer notebook.
    11-07-2015 06:09 AM
  12. anon(3653)'s Avatar
    For my personal life and blogging I use my phone and Chromebook... No need for a traditional computer. For work I have an iPad and Macbook Pro, but only because it is provided to me. I could do everything for my work with a tablet and a Chromebook.
    11-07-2015 07:31 AM
  13. Steve Adams's Avatar
    exactly, At this point in time, a chromebook can be a primary driver for 90% of the population. 10% want to game, do heavy cad design and 3d Graphic work. Everyone else could use a chromebook and be 100% covered with their needs.
    B. Diddy and Laura Knotek like this.
    11-07-2015 08:45 AM
  14. oscarnyc's Avatar
    $ for $ a chromebook offers a better experience (keyboard, touchpad, screen, battery life, weight, speed, maintenance, overall build quality) than a PC for 95% of what I need from a non work-issued laptop. So it makes more sense to spend money on that and then suffer with my old windows laptop for the other 5% of things.
    I lust for a Pixel, but I just can't spare the cash for such a luxury right now.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    11-10-2015 12:07 PM
  15. oscarnyc's Avatar
    Also, for the poster who uses his/her PC for iTunes podcasts, you should try pod kicker. They have a search option which searches iTunes. I've had good success there when other search methods wouldn't work.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    11-10-2015 12:09 PM
  16. B. Diddy's Avatar
    $ for $ a chromebook offers a better experience (keyboard, touchpad, screen, battery life, weight, speed, maintenance, overall build quality) than a PC for 95% of what I need from a non work-issued laptop. So it makes more sense to spend money on that and then suffer with my old windows laptop for the other 5% of things.
    This is exactly my feeling as well.
    11-10-2015 09:46 PM
  17. ffejjj's Avatar
    This has been discussed many times on the forums before. I'm a big fan of Chromebooks, because like the vast majority of computer users, I do almost all of my computer activity in a browser. That includes work (remote access of my hospital's electronic charting system via Citrix), productivity (Google Docs/Sheets), leisure (Google Play Music, Google Play Movies, especially when casting to a Chromecast), and AC forum activity. Although I do have a Windows 10 PC, I do about 98% of computer activity on the Chromebook. Here's a rundown on things I like about it:

    1. Fast and lightweight: Recent Chromebooks perform well, because there are no unnecessary Windows processes bogging things down. It literally boots up in 7 seconds, and I'm ready to start working in about 15 seconds. Chromebooks that have the better processors (like Haswell or Broadwell), along with 4 GB of RAM, can function smoothly with many open tabs.

    2. Tight integration with Google services: I'm all in with Google, and Chromebooks make it easy to access your Google Drive (as if it were just another hard drive on the system), along with all other Google services.

    3. Security: No need for antivirus/security programs, which often bog down Windows PCs. In addition, if I lose my Chromebook, I can rest assured that no one else can access my sensitive data, since it's all in the cloud. All I have to do is change my Google password.

    4. Value: You can get an excellent Chromebook brand new for under $300, and refurbished under $200. My 15" full HD Acer Chromebook with 4 GB of RAM and a fast Broadwell processor was just $179. Any comparably priced Windows laptop will lag behind significantly in performance.

    5. Battery life: Most Chromebooks will go at least 6-8 hours on a single charge, which is hard to find on a similarly priced Windows laptop.

    6. Fast system updates: While a system update is downloading in the background, I only notice the faintest of hiccups. Installation of the update is as simple as rebooting, which again takes 7 seconds. Compare this to Windows PCs, which can take upwards of 30 to 60 minutes to complete multiple updates (longer if you haven't used it in a little while).


    Regarding your specific concerns:

    1. Chromebooks can in fact do a lot while offline. Documents and photos can be edited, music and movies can be played (if downloaded or cached beforehand). It's true that you can't browse without an internet connection, but that of course applies to PCs as well. These days, most people will use whatever laptop they have where there's a wi-fi connection, and if there isn't, that's what your phone's hotspot is for.

    2. There usually is not a need to run a "real" program if the same thing can be achieved on the web. I don't need Word or Libre Office because Google Docs and Sheets do what I need (and I would guess that most people who have Microsoft Office use only about 15% of its features overall anyway). Photoshop is a common criticism, but (a) there are good web-based photo editing sites like Pixlr, (b) Adobe is working on a Photoshop for Chromebooks (https://edex.adobe.com/projectphotoshopstreaming), and (c) the full Photoshop PC program is so huge and resource-consuming that you'd need a much more expensive high end PC to get any decent use out of it. Running high end games is definitely a weak point of Chromebooks, but then again, you're not going to play high end games on a cheap Windows laptop either.

    3. Tablets aren't a good replacement for a Chromebook if you're interested in doing a lot of web browsing, because no matter how powerful the Android tablet is, the browser will always be slower than Chrome on a PC or Chromebook.

    That being said, can a Chromebook completely replace a PC? No, which is why I still (reluctantly) have my big clunky Windows PC sitting on my desk. The main time I fire it up these days is to download a podcast on iTunes that I can't find anywhere else (don't get me started on iTunes ). Still, slowly but surely, the things I used to rely on the PC for are being taken care of in the cloud. I uploaded my entire photo library to Google Photos, so I have no real need to store them on the hard drive as well. My entire music library has also been uploaded to Google Play Music.

    Are Chromebooks for everyone? No, but I would argue that many many people would find them quite useful. You sound like your mind's already made up, but if you ever get a chance, try spending a few weeks playing around with one---you might end up being pleasantly surprised.
    B, I think you just convinced me to try a Chromebook lol

    I didn't even know I wanted one till reading your post!

    Posted via the Android Central App
    B. Diddy likes this.
    11-10-2015 09:54 PM
  18. murphcid's Avatar
    Not enough RAM/Memory for the most part, I'll pass and stick with a real laptop for now. Unless the kids schools require them that is....
    11-11-2015 07:37 AM
  19. CHIP72's Avatar
    Not enough RAM/Memory for the most part, I'll pass and stick with a real laptop for now. Unless the kids schools require them that is....
    Functionally-speaking, chromebooks don't need as much RAM as Windows or OSX computers to function at a high level. I'd recommend getting chromebooks with 4 GB of RAM, but chromebooks with 2 GB of RAM actually work reasonably well in their own right.
    B. Diddy and Laura Knotek like this.
    11-12-2015 11:25 PM
  20. murphcid's Avatar
    I will admit that I am eating crow right now. Due to my daughter just demolishing her laptop, I had to run out and get her something to use Google Docs on for school, and ended up with the 10.1" screen ASUS Chromebook. I still think they are useless, but since her school is mandating Google Docs, etc for homework for seniors, I had to do something. $269 (incl tax) at Best Buy, and I made her put an account for her sister on it as well.
    01-10-2016 06:34 PM
  21. ackmondual's Avatar
    I just don't get the point of chrome books. A crippled device the cannot work unless you have an Internet connection, and can't run any real programs such as photoshop, libre office, word, etc. 16 gb of storage, 2gb of ram, less useful than a decent Windows laptop. What is the point of these devices? A real laptop and tab s2 does it all.
    Just in case there weren't enough convincing posts....

    Many laptops and tablets have their usages reduced without internet connection. Without internet, I would rather go to my 11" Win 10 laptop instead, as I can still do no small # of games, programs (e.g. IDLE for some quick Python programming), documents (Google Office is just fine, but I prefer M$ Office for stuff for heavier formatting, and offline stuff that I can manipulate the actual files), and similar stuff. I've only got an 80 GB SSD there, so I try not to keep any multimedia unless it's work-ish related. Still being offline, I'd go to my iPad for games.

    Google Docs does work for the more than enough folks. As for Photoshop, the scroogled ads that's on TV or videos are amusing because even though a group of 2 people were taken aback how Chromebooks can't run Photoshop nor Illustrator, I'm guessing that was out of at least 10 people who wanted to use Photoshop on the road. Why do you have a Tab S2 if that can't run Photoshop then?

    The 16 GB of storage can be a bit of a sticking point, but most rely on Google's integration of apps and cloud storage for all of that. I keep some image and PDF files locally for easy access, but they're only several MB each in size, so I'm still sitting pretty there. Nice thing here is there are USB ports for external hardrives, and a micro SD card slot for external storage.

    2 GB RAM isn't that big of a deal breaker. Chrome OS is designed to run on lower specs. That said, I use an HP Chromebook 14 with 2 GB of system RAM, and have gotten error messages on browser tabs saying the system ran out of memory. I make sure to close tabs I don't need to be left open. On a scale of 0 through 5 with 5 being a deal breaker, that's about a 1.5 in severity. I wish it had more RAM, but still a long way to go for me to stop using it

    decent laptop. BTW, that same "scroogled" campaign mentioned you could get a Windows 10 laptop for as little as $300, or was it $400? I highly doubt you'd want to run Photoshop on such a laptop, assuming it's even possible... PS needs more resources than not, not to mention a larger screen is better. You can also use a dock, but then that cuts down on mobility, which is "a few strikes" against it.

    Real laptop + tab s2 is now 2 devices you gotta lug around.

    .

    I bought a refurbished HP Chromebook 14 since it was only $190 shipped. That was cheap enough for me to try it out, even if it didn't work out. As suspected, I found an app to program in Python, but it required me being online. There may be offline alternatives, but it's not a priority. I'm pretty sure I won't be able to run a Unity nor Android Studio equivalent on it (and actual, I doubt my win10 laptop could either, but that was also a low price point). The CB's mostly a consumption device that can do low to mid-low productivity. Doing just that, it excels, and to me, it's a joy to use.

    Typing in internet forums, and documents is much nicer with an actual keyboard. It has smart gestures on the trackpad to scroll, switch tabs, and go back/forward quickly. Google products of course do work well with it. I'm reading an ebook for a certification, and it saves where I'm at when I exit. I check an option to make it for reading offline. I use Google Documents to take notes.

    My woes are few, but they are there.... no smart gesture for zooming.... you gotta press Ctrl+= or Ctrl+- for that. I've had the thing restart on me without warning. I had to reopen webpages, but Google Office stuff should be retained (I didn't have to find out the hard way). I've brought up low memory errors.

    .

    Education was brought up, and that's a sector where CB's took 50% marketshare within a few short years. Windows laptops lost about 15% market share, while iPads lost half their share, down to about 23%? The lower specs make it cheaper per unit. There are tools that let staff admin them, set up stuff, and share stuff without having full blown IT knowledge and being too time consuming. Having stuff on the cloud means it's more sharable and backed up. Multiple user profiles means if one student loses or breaks their CB, they can be issued another one, and get back and running swiftly. As a bonus, CBs aren't as valuable as win laptops, And tablets, and ipads, so kids are less likely to steal them, or pawn them.
    Laura Knotek, B. Diddy and CHIP72 like this.
    01-19-2016 02:00 PM
  22. murphcid's Avatar
    I use the S2 to read books, read the Guardian, Times of India,Yahoo, Fox News, and surf the net. My laptop is my daughters old Compaq which has Mint Linux on it, and is good enough for me. My quad core desktop with 5 tb storage is my Photoshop machine. As for the Chromebook, the kids like it, and they can do their homework on it, check school email, etc. Its good enough for them but they whine, and I mean whine about no iTunes....
    01-19-2016 09:19 PM
  23. murphcid's Avatar
    Well the oldest got a new laptop battery, put the hard drive back into place, and voila! her laptop works, and the Chromebook got put away ("I can't do anything on it Dad!, I can't play SIMS, or use my iTunes!") The youngest wants me to put NetFlix on it so she can take it around the house watching movies (No!), But I suspect it will gather dust as the battery slowly dies from non use.
    01-20-2016 07:05 AM
  24. VFC's Avatar
    For < $40 I added a 128GB USB3 memory stick to my Toshiba Chromebook 2. The memory stick is tiny (the size of a wireless mouse receiver), so I keep it plugged it all the time. So I have plenty of local storage.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01...cUvbUpU4960247
    cdubb1 and ybcthanerd like this.
    01-21-2016 12:40 PM
  25. ackmondual's Avatar
    For < $40 I added a 128GB USB3 memory stick to my Toshiba Chromebook 2. The memory stick is tiny (the size of a wireless mouse receiver), so I keep it plugged it all the time. So I have plenty of local storage.

    Amazon.com: Samsung 128GB USB 3.0 Flash Drive Fit (MUF-128BB/AM): Computers & Accessories
    I think the dimensions are a typo? 4 x 6 x 0.1"? I think they meant 0.4 by 0.6?

    Not too shabby. If you have Costco membership, you can buy Lexar brand... $25 for 128 GB, or $20 for two 32 GB.
    01-22-2016 10:18 AM
40 12

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