11-22-2013 10:42 AM
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  1. transistors's Avatar
    a lot of people complain about charging issue on samsung galaxy series...

    the solution is very simple:
    1. Plug the small end of the travel adapter into the multifunction jack.
    2. Plug the large end of the travel adapter into an electrical socket.

    follow those two simple steps in order, don't let the charger plugged in the outlet between charges

    add on 2013NO27 = these informations are from samsung dot com
    SAMSUNG
    09-07-2013 09:40 AM
  2. transistors's Avatar
    here are cues for your lithium battery

    first, some manufacturer don't let you see the real percentage of the battery...

    don't let the battery going lower than 10% (the real thing is NEVER discharge more than 3 volts)

    don't let the battery charge to 100% (the battery will only take full charge of 100% between 300 to 500 times only) do only partly charge (95%)

    on android, google play (play store) download and install "battery monitor widget" to follow the battery condition... (enter the capacity in mAh of your device)

    to reset the "fuel gage" of the battery, at least once a month, let the battery discharge until it turns off by itself, let it 2 hours off, and after plug it to charge with the device off (at least 5 hours).

    add on 2013NO27 = those informations are from batteryuniversity dot com http://batteryuniversity.com/
    09-07-2013 09:48 AM
  3. DesElms's Avatar
    I have never seen so much misinformation as I so routinely see in these forums; and what's in this thread-starter's two outrageous posts is some of the worst of it. Yikes!

    Any charger that comes with any Samsung Galaxy family phone may be left plugged-in to the wall outlet 100% of the time; and one need not plug the phone end of the charger cable into the phone first before plugging-in to the wall outlet; and, in fact, so doing can be harmful to the phone if there should happen to be a momentary surge from the charger immediately upon plugging it into the wall outlet (which, though theortically possible, is admittedly very uncommon).

    It is not true that battery manufacturers don't let you see the real battery pecentage. That is simply ridiculous. If the battery percentage being shown on the phone is inaccurate, it's because the battery has never been calibrated to the phone (something I'll cover further down, herein).

    It is not true that the battery either should not or may not be fully discharged... discharged below 10%... or even discharged to 0%. To suggest otherwise is simply ridiculous; and the phrase "the real thing is NEVER discharge more than 3 volts" reveals that the person using it hasn't the slightest notion what s/he's talking about (hint: read-up on Ohm's Law), and is operating from a flawed understanding of a body of longtime myths about how both current Lithium Ion batteries, and old Nickel Cadmium batteries work. While routinely (or at least occasionally) fully discharging an old Nickel Cadmium battery could help to "untrain" it to a sort of "sweet spot" range of charging efficiency, new Lithium Ion batteries suffer from no such probems. Lithium Ion batteries may be fully charged, fully discharged, partially charged/discharged, and every possible other thing without harming the battery or causing it to have any charge range "sweet spots."

    It is not true that a Lithium Ion battery should not be charged to 100%; that it may only be charged to 100% between 300 and 500 times; and/or that it should only ba charged to 95%. That is simply ridiculous. This myth stems from the fact that a Galaxy family phone will charge to 100%, and then if it's left plugged-in it will stop accepting a charge and allow the battery to discharge to 94% and then allow charging again, back up to 100%; and then if it's still plugged-in, it will allow discharging again to 94%, and then recharging again to 100%... over and over and over again -- all night long if that's when the phone's being charged -- until it's finally disconnected from the charger. If it is disconnected from the charger just after it has allowed discharge to 94%, and has recharged to 95%; and if that's when the user happens to look at the phone and unplug it from the charger, then the user may become under the false impression (and myths in places like this then abound) that the phone only charges to 95%, or that's that's really all the higher it will go; or that the battery percentage is inaccurate, or any of the other myths that get all blurred together by the technologically challenged and sloppy of thought like this thread's starter (or the "OP," as many forums call him/her).

    It's true that any given Lithium Ion battery may only be charged so many times before it kinda' wears out. Whether it's 300 charges, or 500 charges, or 100 charges, or 10,000 charges depends entirely on the battery (and also how it's treated during its lifetime, which I cover, extensively, herein); and since there are so many aftermarket batteries that are actally fake Chinese knockoffs of Samsung-branded batteries, there's no telling how long one will last. Avoid even trying to get batteries with the Samsung brand on them through places like Amazon. Instead, only purchase a Samsung-branded battery from the Samung website, to ensure that it's really made by Samsung, and, of course, you'll really pay for it if you do that! Instead, if you want a decent battery for a decent price on Amazon, get a "RAVPower" or "QCell" brand; they're well-priced and very reliable. There are others, too... the ones from Anker can usually also be trusted; but I, personally, stick with RAVPower... but, hey... that's just me.

    Lithium Ion batteries, in any case, should be steadily used, without ever removing them from the phone unless absolutely necessary (in order to do a battery-removal reset of a frozen phone, for example), for about three months; and then they should be allowed to nearly fully discharge before removing them and swapping-in a new one for its three continuous months while the just-swapped-out one sits on the shelf and "rests," so to speak; and then, at the end of that three months, the old one that's been "resting" should be swapped back in; back and forth, back and forth every three months (or, in other words, quarterly) all year long. So doing will make both batteries last much longer and also display more accurate battery percentages on the phone...

    ...but only if the batteries are calibrated to the phone each time they're freshly installed into the phone. Again, I'll cover calibration in a moment; but every time a battery loses its physical electronic connection with the phone (in other words, if it's removed from the phone for any reason), then the next time it is reinserted into the phone, it must be recalibrated to the phone (the reason for which I'll explain further down, herein, when I explain how to recalibrate). So, then, right there that eliminates the awful habit of having two or three batteries -- one in the phone, and two in chargers -- that the user just keeps swapping into and out the phone all day long as each battery gets low. Nothing both ruins batteries -- nor makes their level percentages inaccurate in the phone -- faster that that awful habit. If the phone's daily usage is so high that it can't make it through the day without interim "refresh" recharges, then recharging the battery, while still in the phone, without swapping it out with another battery, is the only right way to do it. If even that cannot be done, then the solution is not to swap two or thre batteries into and out of the phone all day long but, rather, to simply get a larger/higher-capacity battery... which, of course, means that the phone's back will also need to be replaced to accommodate the larger, thicker battery (which, of course, will suddenly make it so that no TPU or hybrid case will fit anymore).

    How a battery is charged -- at what rate or speed -- can also have a profound effect on both the discharge rate and, especially, the ultimate life of the battery. The charger that comes with the phone is always the one that delivers the highest possible amperage that the phone is able to accept; and so will always charge the phone at maximum speed. However, a battery will discharge slightly slower (in other words, will hold its charge a tad bit longer, and will be less willing to give-up so easily what's stored in it) -- and the battery will, especially, ultimately last a tad bit longer -- if it is routinely charged at a rater slower than that of the charger that came with it. A Galaxy Note II, for example, comes with a 2 amp charger; and so 2 amps is its fastest charging rate. And, indeed, when a battery is brand new and receiving its first charge in the phone, it should definitely be charged the very first time with the maximum-amperage charger that came with the phone; then the phone should be used for a day; and then it should be charged again with the maximum-amperage/fastest-charging-rate charger that came with the phone. However, after that, charging the battery every night while you sleep using a 1.5 amp, or 1 amp, or even a .7 amp charger such as one, for example, that came with the earlier Galaxy family phone that the Note II replaced, and which you may happen to still have in a drawer, can be less wear and tear on the battery; and so said battery will at least last longer, but may also be better about holding its charge longer as it discharges in the phone all day.

    And speaking of chargers: Just as with batteries, most of the Samsung-branded ones in places like Amazon are Chinese knockoffs; and especially the higher-amp ones -- such as the 2 amp one for the Note II, and may other higer-end, bigger, faster Samsung Galaxy family phones -- will not actually charge at that rate; most of them can barely achieve 1.2 amps or so (as can easily be determined, in real time, durin charging, by using this Galaxy Charging Current app; though, preferably the not-free/paid version). So, beware of such seemingly Samsung-branded chargers. If you want an actual Samsung-branded charger that actually charges at the rate on its label, then get it only from the Samsung website (and, of course, pay through the nose for it). However, aftermarket, 3rd-party chargers made by "Anker" or "Ventev" or "EZOPower" can be trusted to deliver the rated amperage; and also last a good, long time. Just make sure that the aftermarket charger is capable of delivering the same as, or more than, the amperage that the charger that came with the phone delivers (or that at least one of the aftermarket charger's ports, if it's a multi-port charger, can so deliver).

    Also, as long as we're talking about charging rates, the cable between the charger and the phone matters... a lot! Wherever and whenever possible, it's important to use the cable that came with the phone: at least then you know that it's both pinned-out properly to ensure that it will do what it's supposed to do; and, also, that the weight of the wires inside are heavy enough for the charger to charge at its rated amperage over the cable's length. Aftermarket/third-party cables -- especially long ones -- often aren't heavy enough, and so they'll allow only a 1.5 amp or 1 amp charging rate, for example, even if using the 2 amp charger that came with the phone. Some aftermarket cables are also not pinned-out (in other words, which wires inside the cable go to which pins of the USB interface) properly, and so they're either not able to both transfer data and charge; or they're not grounded properly, and so that charge is never at full rate, if at all. Some cables are even "charge only" cables, not capable of also transferring data; such cables, though, are usually more-than-adequately heavy to carry the full amperage of the charger to the phone; and so a charge-only cable can sometimes be a good thing. My recommendations for charge-only cables are pretty much any of them made by "MediaBridge," or perhaps "Belkin." As far as cables that both charge and transfer data, the Samsung-branded ones, made for Galaxy family phones actually by Samsung, are the best; with the hands-down best one being the one that came with the phone. If you must replace that one, though, again, most of the Samsung-branded ones in places like Amazon are cheap Chinese knockoffs; and so only getting one from the Samsung website (and, again, paying a lot for it) can be trustd. However, EZOPower makes really excellent -- and inexpensive, too -- USB cables which are pinned-out properly for Samsung Galaxy family phones; as well as having adequately heaving wires inside to handle the full amperage of the charger... at least as long as the cable is not longer than 6 to 10 feet (but preferably 3 to 6 feet).

    On most new phones, the ability to see battery percentage on the notification bar is built-in to the OS, and so a separate (and battery-consuming) widget app is not necessary; and even if one's phone does not have the ability to display battery percentage on the notification bar built right into the phone, then the last thing that a battery indicator app should have is a battery-consuming widget. All that any battery indicator app should do is put a percentage display of battery level up on the notification bar. Period. No widgets, no sophisticated battery tracking analysis, and especially no battery-saving features. Just an indicator. Period. Here are the battery percentage indicator apps, but be careful: look closely at their descriptions; find the one that just displays battery percentage up on the notification bar (or sometimes called "status bar") and nothing (or at least little) else.

    It can also be good to combine the battery percentage indicator capability up on the notification bar with other apps that do useful things. My personal recommendation is using this app (though the paid version, via in-app purchase, in my opinion, to get rid of ads), which does so many other useful things, along with displaying battery percentage up on the notification bar, that it's actually worth whatever small amount of battery it uses.

    If a battery charging current status app is desired, then use one that's actually made for the Galaxy family phones: like this earlier-herein-mentiond one (though, again, preferably the paid version).

    Finally, I just don't even know what to do with this bit of sheer and utter nonsense: "to reset the "fuel gage" of the battery, at least once a month, let the battery discharge until it turns off by itself, let it 2 hours off, and after plug it to charge with the device off (at least 5 hours)". Oh. My. God. Why don't you recommend that the user get the eye of a newt and whisper incantations over the phone, too, as long as you're advocating witchcraft! Yikes!

    I'm grateful for it, though, because it dovetails right into the earlier-herein-promised battery (re)calibration thing. So, now let's cover that...

    Any battery freshly installed into any phone must be calibrate to said phone in order for there to be a prayer of a chance that that phone's battery percentage indicator will be truly accurae. If the battery is truly made by Samsung, and intended for use in the phone in question, then being obsessive about (re)calibration becomes not quite so important.. but it's still important. Even if a battery has been calibrated to a phone, the instant it is removed from said phone (in other words, once its electronic connection to/with the phone is broken), then it must be recalibrated to the phone again once it is reinstalled... and, yes, that means even if the battery is removed only to unfreeze a phone; or to clear it of other odd behaviors...

    ...one of which behaviors includes a variety of failure-to-charge issues which some believe are a common problem with Samsung Galaxy family phones, as we see in this thread, for example; or this one. The simple shutting-down of the device (and by that I mean turning it all the way off, properly, as its maker intended), then removing the device's back cover; then removing the battery from the device; and then just letting it sit there like that for a few minutes (sometimes only a minute or two; but preferably maybe five minutes); and then re-inserting the battery and powering back up properly until it is fully booted-up and everything loading and doing things inside the phone have all calmed down (the equivalent of when the hard drive light calms down after a Windows machine boot-up); and then powering it back off again, and removing the battery again, and waiting a few minutes again, and then re-inserting the battery and powering it back-up again can all go a long way toward eliminating most of the problems wherein the phone gets confused, for example, about whether it's plugged-in to a charger or USB port, and a variety of other issues.

    Most Galaxy family phone charging issues are because users aren't mindful of the very things about which I've written, herein. It's really as simple as that. Sometimes, though, there's a legitimate hardware issue, most commonly with the litte circuit board inside the phone which contains on it the bottom-of-phone both USB port and microphone. Fortunately, it's inexpensive (see here, and here, for two common aftermarket ones; actual Samsung-branded ones would cost maybe twice to three times as much), but one should not tackle the repair oneself unless one has the both technical expertise and the tools. It is, for whatever it's worth, an easy and quick repair for someone with the tools and expertise so shouldn't cost much. Of course if the phone's under warranty, then it should be taken to one of the carrier's device support centers for a warranty repair; or sent to Samsung for an authorized factory repair. One may usually also get -- often free -- a new and actually-made-by-Samsung battery at most carrier device support centers.

    Anyway, back to battey (re)calibration...

    Until and unless any phone actually "knows" what a 100% charge (for any given battery) actually "looks" like, it cannot be expected to report completely accurate battery levels either using its built-in battery percentage meter, or any afermarket one, up on the notication bar (or even via any on-the-homescreen widgets). The purpose of (re)calibrating any given battery to the phone into which it has been newly-placed is simply so that said phone's internal battery-monitoring/reporting circuitry will properly recognize when said battery is really and truly at 100% charge so that said battery-monitoring/reporting circuitry will accurately report battery percentage via whatever battery percentage indicator is up in the notification (aka "status") bar. Fortunately, it's a simple and relatively quick process which anyone may do; but it absolutely must be done for any given battery very soon after it has been newly-installed into the phone...

    ...including, again, even only if the battery has been briefly removed just to unfreeze (or battery-removal-reset) a phone! Anytime, again, that the electro-physical connection between the phone and any given battery has been broken, then said battery must be recalibrated to said phone after it has been reinserted into said phone. And, certainly, any battery swapped-into the phone as part of the earlier-herein-mentioned quarterly use-then-rest methodology needs to be recalibrated to the phone soon after said swap-in.

    For that reason, swapping two or three batteries in and out of the phone all day long just doesn't work. Because none of them ever get recalibrated to the phone, none of them are having their true charge levels accurately reported by the phone; and so it becomes a self-defeating thing since the battery, eventually, gets reported as nearly dead (and so the user insensibly swaps it out) when, in fact, it still has a considerable amount of charge in it. If, again, the phone is so heavily used that its overnight charge won't make it 'til the end of the day, then the only two solutions are to either do interim "refresh" recharges all day long, or get a larger battery (with concomitant larger phone back).

    The charger and cable that should be used for battery (re)calibration should be the ones that came with the phone, if possible. If not, then a charger and cable of the type and caliber (and brand) as I earlier herein mentioned should be used; and you must make sure that said charger is capable of delivering at least the amperage of the charger that came with the phone (or if it's a multi-port charger, that you use the port which delivers the higher amperage).

    Here's how to (re)calibrate a battery to a phone...

    FIRST, charge the phone, with the phone turned-on, all the way to 100%. You will obviously need a battery percentage indicator up on the notification bar, which I have herein already covered. Only a percentage indicator will work: do not try to determine if the phone is at 100% charge using the graphic of a battery which displays, for example, half-full of green color if at 50% charge. You need a truly digital percentage indicator... either the one built-into the phone, if there is one, or an aftermarket one such as I herein earlier describe. So, anyway, first charge the phone all the way up to 100% while the phone is turned on.

    SECOND, once the battery percentage indicator shows that the phone has been charged to 100% with its power on, then unplug the phone from the charger and immediately power-off the phone... meaning actually turn it off... all the way off... not merely blank its screen. To turn the phone truly off, long-press the hardware POWER button until the "Device options" dialog (the one that offers the abiliy to power off, or reset, or go into "Airplane mode") appears. Then choose "power off," and verify with "OK" that's that's really what you want to do. Then keep holding the phone in your hand, feeling for the little vibration burst, just before the blue LED light goes out, to indicate that the phone's really all the way off. Wait another few seconds after you feel that vibration burst (and the blue light goes out) to really make sure that the phone's by-golly all the way off... fully off.

    THIRD, plug the charger into the turned-off phone; a green image of a battery will light-up, and that charging-while-off battery graphic will obviously be showing that it's charging. It will blank-out after a few seconds; that's okay, just let it charge while off. When it finally hits a 100%-charge-while-off, the little charging-while-off battery graphic will light-up again for a few seconds, showing a 100% charge in white letters. If the battery is brand new, this could take actually several minutes, so just be patient. And if you think you may have missed the brief light-up of the screen to show 100% charge, no problem: Just short-press-and-quickly-release the phone's POWER button to briefly light-up the screen's little charging-while-off battery graphic; and if it doesn't yet say 100%, then just keep being patient while it blanks again and just keeps charging-while-off.

    FOURTH, when the phone finally reaches a 100% charge while off, then unplug the charger from the phone; and then, with the phone unplugged from the charger, power it back up again (in other words, long-press and hold the hardware POWER button until the "Samsung Galaxy Note II" splash graphic lights-up, and then release the POWER button and just patiently wait while the phone fully boots up; be careful not to simultaneously press either of the volume rocker hardware buttons on the left side of the phone while you're pressing the POWER button on right side). DO NOT RUSH THINGS! Just like a Windows computer, a phone takes a while to fully -- and that's the operative word -- boot-up. On a Windows machine, one can tell that the machine's finally fully booted-up by looking at its hard drive light to see when it finally calms down and stops being either fully on or frequently flickering; but a phone has no such hardware light, so it's best to just be patient and give the phone plenty of time to fully boot-up... maybe even as long as five minutes.

    FIFTH, once the phone's fully booted-up, turn right around power it all the way off, again (long-pressing the POWER button until the dialog pops-up which allows the "power off" choice; then verify with "OK"; then wait 'til you feel the power-off vibration burst and the blue light goes out; then wait a few seconds for the phone to really-and-truly be all the way off).

    SIXTH, once the phone's fully off, plug-in the charger again, and, again, perform a charge-while-off to 100% again. Again, it will briefly show the charging-while-off battery graphic, then blank; then it will briefly light-up again when it finally hits a 100% charge while off, then blank again; so pay attention. And, again, if you happen to miss the 100% charge-while-off brief light-up, just press-and-immediately-release the POWER button to briefly light-up the charging-while-off battery graphic to see if it shows 100% yet; and if not, then just let it blank and keep charging until it does. It should happen much faster this time, though; so just pay attention.

    SEVENTH, once the phone's fully 100% charged-while-off, unplug the charger for the final (for this procedure) time; and then go ahead and power-up the phone normally; and after it's fully booted-up, use it normally. The battery is now calibrated to the phone.

    NOTE:
    If it's a brand new battery, then repeat the process, just for good measure, after around five days. A battery that's been used, even if it has sat "resting" on a shelf for three months, need only be recalibrated once after being inserted back into a phone; only brand new, first-time-ever-used batteries should be recalibrated about five days after initial calibration.

    If you do everything as I've herein explained, and are mindful of all the conditions and situations herein explained, and your phone doesn't have a hardware problem with the earlier-mentioned little circuit board inside it which has the USB port and bottom-of-phone mic on it, then you should never have so much as a moment's problem with charging your Samsung Galaxy family phone... ever. Do not be misled by people who apparently believe in witchcraft and/or voodoo, like the OP, here.
    11-19-2013 02:01 PM
  4. meyerweb#CB's Avatar
    WOW!

    Unfortunately, I broke my wrist a couple of days ago, and typing is a struggle, so I can't really address the above point by point. But the level of misinformation in the post immediately above dwarfs the errors in the 1st two posts. Talk about "eye of newt!" This is a mixture of internet myth and misinformation filtered through technological confusion, leavened with outright fantasy.

    I'll address only one thing specifically: :Bump charging" (the 7 step process which is claimed to "calibrate" your battery meter) does nothing of the sort. What it does do is overcharge your battery, shortening its useful life. Most of the rest is just ludicrous, not harmful.

    http://phandroid.com/2010/12/25/your...h-a-bad-thing/

    If you absolutely need the highest capacity on a device like this, you will need to bump charge. There are currently people experimenting with “fixes” for this, but I have yet to see one that works. Be warned, however, that repeated bump charging will wear your battery faster and begin to reduce its capacity. If you are a “power user” who will buy a new battery a few months from now anyway, this presumably isn’t a concern. If you are an average consumer who uses a device for a few years, I would recommend that you stay away from bump charging. The bottom line is that you don’t really “need” to do it unless you are actually depleting your battery to 0% on a regular basis.
    This whole thread should be labeled as [un]science fiction.
    11-20-2013 12:21 PM
  5. Eclipse2K's Avatar
    here are cues for your lithium battery
    first, some manufacturer don't let you see the real percentage of the battery... don't let the battery going lower than 10% (the real thing is NEVER discharge more than 3 volts)

    True, Lithium Ion batteries prefer to be charged but once in a while its okay to do so. Not recommended if you can avoid it though.





    don't let the battery charge to 100% (the battery will only take full charge of 100% between 300 to 500 times only) do only partly charge (95%)

    No, that's just silly and incorrect. A full charge cycle is 100% and charging from 0-95% would leave 5% off that full cycle. You're not saving your battery by doing this as you're still charging 95% of the cells which put them through the "cycle".





    on android, google play (play store) download and install "battery monitor widget" to follow the battery condition... (enter the capacity in mAh of your device)

    This is fine. I prefer GSAM Battery Monitor but that's all personal preference.




    to reset the "fuel gage" of the battery, at least once a month, let the battery discharge until it turns off by itself, let it 2 hours off, and after plug it to charge with the device off (at least 5 hours).

    I've heard this too on Ni-Ion but this is Lithium Ion which don't suffer from memory loss. You would be better off charging at any point you can rather than draining it completely. Why risk running out of battery when the next day for no reason? Plug it in even if its at 90%.






    Note that I apologize if you're using Tapatalk and this looks like a jumbled mess. The first statement is the original posters and the second is always mine. I skipped extra spaces to begin next question/statement. I'll try and fix later but it looks fine in PC where my responses are BOLD.



    Sent from my Droid Maxx using Tapatalk
    DesElms likes this.
    11-20-2013 01:26 PM
  6. DesElms's Avatar
    Unfortunately, I broke my wrist a couple of days ago, and typing is a struggle, so I can't really address the above point by point.
    Sorry to learn of your injury. Hope it heals both well and soon.

    But the level of misinformation in the post immediately above dwarfs the errors in the 1st two posts. Talk about "eye of newt!" This is a mixture of internet myth and misinformation filtered through technological confusion, leavened with outright fantasy.
    Specifics, critic. Name one single bit of misinformation in it. One. Single. Bit. (Other than your 'bump charging" silliness, below, which doesn't count because that's not what it is: you can't call a thing what it isn't, and then complain as if it's what it was, which anyone who's taken a college freshman philosphy/logic course would know. Plus, note that I promptly disembowel it, in any case.) Oh, yeah... that's right... you can't be specific because of your alleged broken wrist. How convenient. I would have preferred to just wait six weeks for it to heal so that you really could be more specific...

    ...except that you, me and God all know you can't... not, at least, with any degree of authority. Go find any engineer at any company that designs and builds batteries and I guarantee s/he'll confirm the validity of what I've herein above written.

    I'll address only one thing specifically: :Bump charging" (the 7 step process which is claimed to "calibrate" your battery meter) does nothing of the sort. What it does do is overcharge your battery, shortening its useful life. Most of the rest is just ludicrous, not harmful.
    The seven step process is not "bump charging." Get your terminology right. Rather, it's a one-time-only (per fresh insertion of any given battery into a phone) procedure; and all it's really doing is getting the battery to where it really and truly is at a 100% charge so that that last time the phone boots-up after the second charge-while-off, it's actually seeing a true 100% charge. Armed with that information, it will then far more accurately display the battery charge percentage. That's all that the seven-step (re)calibration process does. There's no magic in it.

    And that one-time-per-fresh-insertion process does not overcharge the battery. In fact, overcharging of a battery while in the phone, whether said phone is on or off, as long as the proper cable and charger are being used, is simply not possible...

    ...and if you actually knew as much about how the phone, itself, regulates the amount of current allowed to flow to the battery, as the arrogance of your response would seem to suggest that you clearly only think you know, then you'd know at least that. What you, in fact, don't know about how batteries and chargers with phones actually work would, I suspect, fill a book. When your wrist gets better, you should write one; then submit it to peer review, and learn just how ignorant of these things you really are.

    It is contributors like you, fostering myths, and decrying those who dispel them -- jealous, I suspect, of others who actually have knowledge, and are willing and able to share it (is all I can figure) -- who ruin such as this forum. All I can do is impart the information, and hope readers know whose words to believe. What a pity and shame it is that the forum paradigm vets no better than that.
    FSU30 likes this.
    11-20-2013 03:40 PM
  7. meyerweb#CB's Avatar
    The fact that you don't even understand what bump charging is, and that your "procedure" does the same thing pretty much invalidates you as a source of knowledge, as does your belief that removing a battery causes the loss of all "calibration data." All of these batteries are chipped, and carry their own calibration data. The phone will regulate max current flow, yes, but the battery tells the phone when it's charged nit the other way around. The phone reads this from the battery, nothing more. You're also wrong that the included charger for all phones provides the max current the phone will accept. That's easily provable just by charging an S3 from a 2 amp charger instead of the included 700 mA charger.

    Jealous? Of what? A self anointed "expert" who's made up his own battery religion, which we're supposed to accept on faith? Me, fostering myths? Maybe you should check my posting history and "Thanks" counter before you start calling names? Or maybe you could cite your extensive background in battery technology, or some real experts who agree with you?

    Show me ONE battery company that says this is the way to treat a Li battery. Just one. Or one phone manufacturer. You're the one making outrageous claims that no phone maker has endorsed. It's up to you to support them.
    garublador likes this.
    11-20-2013 04:04 PM
  8. meyerweb#CB's Avatar



    don't let the battery charge to 100% (the battery will only take full charge of 100% between 300 to 500 times only) do only partly charge (95%)

    No, that's just silly and incorrect. A full charge cycle is 100% and charging from 0-95% would leave 5% off that full cycle. You're not saving your battery by doing this as you're still charging 95% of the cells which put them through the "cycle".
    What's silly is the idea that batteries charge only one cell at a time. All cells charge, and discharge, together, so if the battery is at 95% charge then all cells are at 95% charge.
    11-20-2013 04:08 PM
  9. Eclipse2K's Avatar
    What's silly is the idea that batteries charge only one cell at a time. All cells charge, and discharge, together, so if the battery is at 95% charge then all cells are at 95% charge.
    Yes, true. I've had a long day and admit that I worded my point incorrectly. However, it doesn't hurt to charge whenever you feel like it. If the cells are at 95% then go ahead and charge. It doesn't matter and that's the point I'm making.

    Sent from my Droid Maxx using Tapatalk
    11-20-2013 04:34 PM
  10. Mooncatt's Avatar
    The way I understand it, phone batteries are only one cell, and they just use different size cells depending on capacity and discharge rate needs. If they were multi-cell, then you'd have to worry about balancing the cells to make sure you're not over charging/discharging individual cells in a multi-cell pack during normal use and charge cycles.
    11-20-2013 05:03 PM
  11. DesElms's Avatar
    I stand by my words, @meyerweb, and leave to you to prove a single fault in them. I have better things to do with my time. Wish you could say the same.
    11-20-2013 05:54 PM
  12. Nashcat66's Avatar
    On behalf of all Mankind... thank you. Always fun to watch a cerebral take down unfolding.
    11-20-2013 11:11 PM
  13. meyerweb#CB's Avatar
    I stand by my words, @meyerweb, and leave to you to prove a single fault in them. I have better things to do with my time. Wish you could say the same.
    LOL. You make wild assertions which differ in almost all respects from conventional wisdom, refuse to provide any evidence to support them or any indication you have any particular experience with battery technology, and expect others to accept them on faith. Then you resort to the ultimate strategy of those who can't back up their position. Attack your opposition's character, and demand others prove their argument. Sorry, you haven't proved anything (other than you can't provide any proof), so why should it fall on me to do so? You made the argument that "any engineer at any company that designs and builds batteries [will confirm] the validity of what I've herein above written" so you have the obligation to prove it, not the other way around. Find me just one. Heck, find me a simple web page from any electronic products or battery manufacturer that supports most of your statements. Find me just one, and I'll shut up. Until then, I suggest you do the same.

    Apparently you've never studied any form of debate, but when you make a statement the burden of proof is on you. And when you resort to attacking your opponent, instead of his positions, you lose.

    And no, using mobile phones since the 80s doesn't qualify you as an expert. Designing them, maybe, but its a little late to make that claim. I've been driving cars since the 60s. That doesn't make me an expert on how to build a tire.

    Anyone here is free to waste their time following your advice. Most, I think, are smart enough not to bother.
    sMt73 likes this.
    11-21-2013 08:31 AM
  14. DesElms's Avatar
    I stand by my words, @meyerweb, and leave to you to prove a single fault in them. It's you, who's challenging them, and not me who's required to follow masters thesis APA formatting and footnoting procedure (something you'd know nothing about, of course) in a mere forum posting. You think I'm making wild assertions? Fine. Prove it. Until then, I stand by my words. Period.

    I've noticed that there's a certain contingent of forum members around here who simply cannot allow others their wisdom and experience; and will take issue with anyone who deigns to exhibit their hard-earned authority. They're likely very young and terribly insecure; and they've clearly never paid their dues to really and truly know things, and not merely surmise them. You, @meyerweb, would appear to be the poster child of such malfunctionaries; and as is true about such persons in all places, not just in forums, there's little society can do other than just try to avoid them, and wait for them to break a law or do something over which to be sued, or perhaps finally so tick-off someone that they end-up getting really hurt. Your day of one of those eventualities, young man -- not from me, mind you; but just generally -- trust me, is coming. Just keep doing what you're doing, in life, and wait for it.

    One thing that's nearly always true about such miscreants, I've observed, is that they hide, online, behind aliases rather than using their real names and standing behind their words in real life, as well as online, as do I. That takes a special kind of courage which the cowardly, like yourself, who routinely engage in taking drive-by potshots, just for its sake, at others who make them feel small by knowing what they wish they knew, and knowing how to convey it (usually because they're impotent -- probably in all senses of that term -- in real life), simply don't have. Your pathology is evident, here, for all to see; and you, me and God all know that I'm not the first person to point it out to you.

    Please grow-up, @meyerweb. Get some real-life help for your feelings of both impotence and your pathological problems with authority. Others are smart, too, not just you. Own what you know, and give them what they know, without insisting on making them look bad in order to make yourself feel better. That's what children do. Again, grow-up.

    I stand by my words, and leave to you to prove a single fault in them. That will not change; nor will any else of the above I've here written; so unless you just like reading yourself rail in places like this, you might as well just move on. You won't, of course... your insecure and impotent likes never do; they can't... it's part of their(your) pathology. And so please, by all means, continue to exhibit, here, that pathology for all to see.

    Tag, you're it.
    FSU30 likes this.
    11-21-2013 10:18 AM
  15. Mooncatt's Avatar
    I stand by my words, and leave to you to prove a single fault in them.
    Considering you're the one that is challenging conventional wisdom, actually it is up to you to back up your statements with supporting evidence. Then you can have a debate on who's right or wrong. Simply going against the grain and then telling others to prove you wrong is almost as pointless as trying to prove a negative, and your character attacks only make it worse. Imagine if I went around saying the Earth is flat and didn't provide any of my own evidence, but always answered any challenge to the contrary with "prove me wrong" and then insulted those people when they didn't. Sounds pretty bad on my part, right? That's basically what you're doing here.
    sMt73 likes this.
    11-21-2013 11:30 AM
  16. garublador's Avatar
    Considering you're the one that is challenging conventional wisdom, actually it is up to you to back up your statements with supporting evidence.
    That's how basic logic and critical thinking work. It's up to the person providing information to prove it's true, not up to everyone else to prove it's wrong. If that's the type of critical thinking that went into coming up with all of that information I'd have serious doubts about its accuracy, especially considering that he's flat out denied giving any sources after being asked several times.

    As someone who actually does design mobile devices, I'd recommend that any one reading this thread totally ignore every piece of information about batteries that's been presented. I'm not saying to do the opposite, just completely forget that this thread exists. It's a mish-mash of partial truths, old-wive's tales, some accurate information and some total BS. It's not worth the time trying to figure out what advice to follow and what to ignore. Get your information elsewhere.
    11-21-2013 12:31 PM
  17. DesElms's Avatar
    Considering you're the one that is challenging conventional wisdom, actually it is up to you to back up your statements with supporting evidence. Then you can have a debate on who's right or wrong. Simply going against the grain and then telling others to prove you wrong is almost as pointless as trying to prove a negative, and your character attacks only make it worse. Imagine if I went around saying the Earth is flat and didn't provide any of my own evidence, but always answered any challenge to the contrary with "prove me wrong" and then insulted those people when they didn't. Sounds pretty bad on my part, right? That's basically what you're doing here.
    Thank you for your input @Mooncatt, but I'm not "going against the grain" or "challenging conventional wisdom." Please show me any part of what I wrote which does that. Any part. Please.

    And you really need to get straight your understanding of who insulted whom, here.

    People who take the kind of time I took to share wisdom, knowledge and experience that I did, here, should be thanked, not castigated. I provide comprehensive tech information in about a half dozen places out on the Internet; and I always hear from people in the peanut gallery who just can't seem to stand it. I'm not saying -- at least not yet -- that you're one of them, too; but I'm just saying that it's a curious phenomenon; and I see it here, in these forums, almost more than anywhere else. I get private messages or emails all the time from people who read the entire thread, find my words to be the most reasonable, and then take a chance on that I'm right...

    ...and not a single one of them, ever, has said that I was wrong; or that the results I promised didn't occur. I just, the other day, heard from a woman in Texas who found an old thread wherein I explained why so many people with original Notes were having so many problems with them after using KIES to upgrade to 4.1.2 Jelly Bean. My information was both from testing on multiple phones, taking the manager of an AT&T Device Support Center to lunch, once, and picking his brain; then having a half dozen or so telephone conversations with AT&T engineers with whom he connected me; and then two Samsung engineers -- one of them in Korea -- with whom they connected me. Anything I write always has that kind of imprimatur behind it; but I'm certainly not going to explain, every single time I recommend something, the long road to my acquiring the knowledge; and unlike many who just blurt-out stuff that makes sense to them, but which is backed by nothing, I never recommend anything which I have not both tried and tested and measure results.

    The Texas woman is also mature and experienced, and so she recognized, by the time she made it to the end of the thread, that I knew what I was talking about; and so she asked for some help with her Note which she had six-months-ago upgraded using KIES, but without doing it as I recommended (for which recommendations I was roundly chastised by people like in this thread who just can't allow for anyone to know anything they don't know, or be smarter than are they about anything); and so her Note was a slow, buggy, battery-sucking, godawful mess... and she had been enduring it, brought almost to tears on occasiona over it, for six months. And she was swapping-out batteries multiple times per day just to get the phone, even without any use, through said day.

    I told her in the thread what she needed to do, but then so she wouldn't have to reveal any personal information about herself, I asked her to move it to private messaging or email so I could help her, directly... which I did.

    One week later, her phone was perfect. We talked on the phone just this past Saturday, and she confirmed that after almost two weeks of use since she did all that I told her to do, the phone is magnificent... exactly as it was supposed to be behaving; and using my battery-saving tips (which can be found in a monster two-part post in one of the "Juice Defender" threads around here, her Note is able to make it through almost 36 hours, even with reasonable use, without needing a charge. And it's fast again, and wonderful again, like it was when she first got it, but before she did the 4.1.2 upgrade.

    I mention her only because she's the most recent one from at least this forum. There are many, many before her, from this forum and from others. She has promised to go into that thread and tell my detractors in it that they're all nuts; and relate to them what I have just related to you. However, her daughter just had a baby and so that's been distracting her. But while she didn't share it directly, I got the sense from what she has both written and said to me that she's also a little intimidated about making such a posting because she doesn't want to endure what she saw me endure in that thread.

    Those who chime-in to threads like this and take people to task for just trying to help, as I'm doing -- and which I do the way I do because I refuse to allow anyone to be misled by blatant misinformation, as is found in this thread's two starting posts -- do not appreciate how they make others feel. This may only be a virtual world, but human feelings and emotions are not binary like everything else in the virtual world, and so may not be so easily turned on and off at will.

    The thread-starter, here, appears to have signed-up expressly so s/he could effectively "spam" 17 (or was it 20, I can't remember) battery-related threads with a link to this thread; and then s/he proffered, here, pure hocus pocus. I corrected that by both responding to all of his/her spams with that I posted my correcting post, here, and by, of course, making said correcting post. I did that for the same reason that I oft en post here: to make sure no one gets misled.

    If you and/or others (any one of whom, by the way, could be the thread-starter, operating from a different account, here... which, of course is a TOS violation) don't like the way I do it, fine. Don't like it all you want. But that's a form-over-content argument, which gets us nowhere. If you have specifics with which you'd like to take issue, then please do so. But stick to the issues, and be specific. Don't get caught-up in form-over-content arguments, as you're here doing.

    I invite you, as I've invited others: Find one single thing I've written that's provably wrong. One. Single. Thing. How 'bout we all just stick with that, shall we? At least that way maybe someone around here will actually learn something... or is that not one of this place's goals?
    FixMyAndroid likes this.
    11-21-2013 12:39 PM
  18. garublador's Avatar
    People who take the kind of time I took to share wisdom, knowledge and experience that I did, here, should be thanked, not castigated.
    Isn't that exactly what you did to the OP and also without providing any proof?

    It doesn't matter how many words you write if none of them give a single shred of evidence that what you wrote is true. For how many words you've written in this single thread you could have linked to nearly every credible source on Li-Ion batteries on the internet several times over. Claiming you can't be troubled to spend the time to site your sources, then spending 10 times the amount of time it would take to site the sources rambling about how awesome you are doesn't really make you sound horribly credible.

    and which I do the way I do because I refuse to allow anyone to be misled by blatant misinformation,
    That's what the "peanut gallery" is doing as well. We don't want unsubstantiated misinformation spread, either.
    11-21-2013 12:56 PM
  19. anon(394005)'s Avatar
    Battery University has some good info about charging lithium based batteries: How to Prolong Lithium-based Batteries - Battery University
    FixMyAndroid likes this.
    11-21-2013 01:00 PM
  20. Rukbat's Avatar
    I find that while some of Battery Unicersity's information is theoretically right on the money, in practice they're a bit off on a few tings. Case in point is the phone I'm currently using while Samsung is replacing my real one - A Motorola V551 with the original OEM battery. If 10 years of holding a full charge isn't doing it the right way, I'd like to hear a better one.
    11-21-2013 02:39 PM
  21. DesElms's Avatar
    Isn't that exactly what you did to the OP and also without providing any proof?
    I never said the OP had to provide proof; I said s/he needed to be accurate. There's a difference. And s/he was not accurate.

    I was. It's up to you to prove I wasn't, if it's so vexing you. If you could prove it, then you would have, by now, instead of wasting your time making pointless form-over-content arguments.

    Put-up, or shut-up.
    11-21-2013 03:33 PM
  22. DesElms's Avatar
    That's how basic logic and critical thinking work. It's up to the person providing information to prove it's true, not up to everyone else to prove it's wrong. If that's the type of critical thinking that went into coming up with all of that information I'd have serious doubts about its accuracy, especially considering that he's flat out denied giving any sources after being asked several times.

    As someone who actually does design mobile devices, I'd recommend that any one reading this thread totally ignore every piece of information about batteries that's been presented. I'm not saying to do the opposite, just completely forget that this thread exists. It's a mish-mash of partial truths, old-wive's tales, some accurate information and some total BS. It's not worth the time trying to figure out what advice to follow and what to ignore. Get your information elsewhere.
    I think we have a case, here, of someone with multiple accounts, here, posting as if multiple people, seeming to support himself/herself, and appearing to gang-up on me when, in fact, it's all (or mostly all) quite likely the thread-starter doing most of the complaining. No one likes having his/her beliefs -- especially when they're espoused as expertise -- challenged. The thread-starter, again, seemed to have signed-up expressly for the purpose of posting his/her 20-or-so links in various other forum threads to this one, where s/he then proffered nonsense.

    I, then, ripped that nonsense rug right out from under him/her, and that, no doubt, hurt... or at least threw cold water on whatever was his/her goal in all this. Now s/he's fuming mad, and appears to be frantically posting the same arguments, using the same phraseology, but as seemingly different persons.

    I used to manage a huge and popular forum, like this. I know the signs. I invite a mod or admin to check the server log and s/he, I believe, will find what I'm here writing to be true.

    Also, c'mon... you and my dead grandmother "design mobile devices." I may have been born at night, but I wasn't born last night. Please stop peeing on our collective leg and then telling us it's raining.

    So, anyway... would you like me to report, for you, my suspicion of multiple accounts being used by one person, in violation of this place's TOS for you? I'd be happy to, if you need it. Just let me know.
    11-21-2013 03:46 PM
  23. Mooncatt's Avatar
    This is almost as good as that "Trucker Ride for the Constitution" fiasco a few weeks ago. :screwy:
    11-21-2013 04:31 PM
  24. garublador's Avatar
    I never said the OP had to provide proof; I said s/he needed to be accurate. There's a difference. And s/he was not accurate.
    And I'm saying you're not accurate. If you didn't have to provide proof when you made that claim, then I come I have to provide proof for doing the exact same thing you're doing?

    I think we have a case, here, of someone with multiple accounts, here, posting as if multiple people, seeming to support himself/herself, and appearing to gang-up on me when, in fact, it's all (or mostly all) quite likely the thread-starter doing most of the complaining.
    He're's an example of you going on the attack rather than arguing a logical point. I don't know about anyone else, but I only post from one account.

    No one likes having his/her beliefs -- especially when they're espoused as expertise -- challenged.
    You really can't see that you're doing that exact same thing?

    I, then, ripped that nonsense rug right out from under him/her, and that, no doubt, hurt... or at least threw cold water on whatever was his/her goal in all this. Now s/he's fuming mad, and appears to be frantically posting the same arguments, using the same phraseology, but as seemingly different persons.
    No one has said the OP was right. He's very wrong, too. You at least posted some stuff that's somewhat accurate, it's just muddled in with a bunch of obsolete battery voodoo.

    I used to manage a huge and popular forum, like this. I know the signs. I invite a mod or admin to check the server log and s/he, I believe, will find what I'm here writing to be true.
    That would be awesome if they did that. If you want to do a little bit of your own digging you can probably find places where I've directly contradicted nearly everything the OP has said prior to September 7th. Why would I make a fake account just to contradict the advice I'd given earlier?

    Also, c'mon... you and my dead grandmother "design mobile devices." I may have been born at night, but I wasn't born last night. Please stop peeing on our collective leg and then telling us it's raining.
    Believe what you want. I have a degree in EE, I spent 5 years doing design-for-test for PCB's that went into enterprise level servers, 4 years as an EE at a company that designs and builds farm equipment used in crop research and the last 3 at a company that does mostly contract engineering and specialized in mobile devices.

    So, anyway... would you like me to report, for you, my suspicion of multiple accounts being used by one person, in violation of this place's TOS for you? I'd be happy to, if you need it. Just let me know.
    Absolutely! I'm interested to hear what the admins think of people wasting their time like that. I'm sure it's their favorite thing to do.
    11-21-2013 04:33 PM
  25. Kevin OQuinn's Avatar
    1) There are no duplicate accounts in this thread. We know how to do our job (and have been watching this thread for a while).

    2) I'm the guy in charge of these forums (yes, I answer to someone, but the proverbial buck stops with me). So, take what I say to heart.

    3) @DesElms - You're coming across as rude, condescending, and insulting in some cases. Best watch how you say what you're saying. You can say pretty much anything you want if you say it correctly (within in the confines of the rules of course). I'm pretty sure this is why people are taking issue with what you're saying.

    4) @DesElms - Your seven step process is bump charging. I don't care what other people have told you. It is. Look at my signature on the desktop and tell me that I don't have access to specifically the types of engineers that would know. Bump charging is bad, and can cause an overvolt situation in the battery. Why? Because it forces an ever so small amount of current to enter the battery when you first start charging it until the device realizes it's already at 100%. That's not good for a battery of any kind.

    Batteries have a rated capacity. That capacity CAN be exceeded, though (again, this is the case with any battery of any kind). Exceeding the capacity is not good for the cells inside the battery.

    I also have no doubt that in some cases you absolutely know what you're talking about.

    5) @meyerweb - Thanks for handling this thread so well.

    6) Everyone else - Try not to write off what's been said in this thread so quickly. Surely there are some knowledgable folks posting in here, and while not everything is accurate (bump charging for sure), even some of the not-so-accurate stuff won't hurt anything.


    Here's when you charge your phone (and how to charge it). Whenever you want. Dead. Not dead. Somewhere in between. Plug it in, let it go until the indicator is green. Try to use the supplied charger, or at least not a cheap knock-off charger. I use the charger that came with my SHIELD to charge everything. Phones, tablets, SHIELD, anything that charges with MicroUSB gets charged with that. It's never caused any problems with any device whatsoever.


    Ok. Can we all move on please?

    Sent from my K00C using Tapatalk 4
    Eclipse2K, Aquila, FSU30 and 4 others like this.
    11-21-2013 04:48 PM
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