1. hallda01's Avatar
    *I posted this also in the iMore forums, but wanted the Android perspective as well. Just don't use it as an excuse to bash Apple.*

    First off, this is mostly based off of anecdotal evidence so don't take it too seriously; it's just a thought I had.

    I'm in my twenties, and like many people my age, I'm usually chomping at the bit to get my upgrade a good 6 months prior to my actual date. I can't wait to get the latest and greatest. You should've seen the smartphone envy I had when my wife had the HTC One and I had the BlackBerry Bold 9930. Meanwhile, my Dad is the sort of person that thinks more on the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" mentality. He's rocking an LG Rumor POS slider with a non-capacitive touchscreen, and he's had an upgrade for 2 months just sitting there. I feel like a lot of older people that are not used to the quick turnover in electronics are like this, and don't mind missing out on the best features because they're comfortable with the device they had (which probably took them a long time to figure out in the first place).

    In my professional life (I'm a first-year attorney) I find that a lot of middle aged and older lawyers and office staff have iPhones. They don't really know much about technology or phones or anything (one time I told a co-worker that my wife got the HTC One, specifically saying "HTC" and he asked if that was a Samsung or a Droid), but they know that the iPhone is a great phone, so they get iPhones (much like a few years back when business people knew BlackBerrys were great so they got BlackBerrys). These are the same type of people that have the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" mentality that my Dad has. They were dragged kicking and screaming into the smart phone arena, spent forever trying to figure out this device, and don't want to rock the boat again. They will be using that iPhone 4s until it completely dies.

    These people that hold on to a device until it breaks, as opposed to until it is old, seem much more likely to get an iPhone than one of the Android or Windows flagships lately. So my question is, do you think that these sort of consumers will drive down sales of iPhones in the long run compared to the other platforms? Should Apple change to try and attract more users who want to be on the cutting edge?
    07-16-2013 09:24 AM
  2. jtc276's Avatar
    Very good post. Even though I see people with old iPhones and Androids, it is more typical to see people with older iPhones.

    Something that might be keeping iPhone users from upgrading is how little the software and exterior hardware changes have been. I know people who honestly don't know the difference between the 4 and the 4S. And, really, that's the general consumer. So let's say a general consumer has an iPhone 4. The 4S comes out and they decide to pass because it looks the same. Then the 5 comes out but the only difference is that it's a little bigger. Then the 5S is released and it looks the same as the 5. That's how someone who isn't crazy about phones thinks. Of course none of that is true. Each of those phones has something under the hood that makes it better than its predecessor but the general consumer is typically unaware.

    What will make a difference is iOS 7 because it actually looks different. The iPhone 4 user is going to see someone with a 4S, 5, or 5S and notice that the other person's phone looks different now but they're not able to make theirs look different. So here this type of consumer splits. One type will think "Wow. I want to try the new software." The other will think "That looks confusing. I'm going to stay with what I have." And then the cycle begins again or simply stays the same.

    Apple has a very interesting upgrade cycle that no other manufacturer quite has. In my opinion, it's a bit boring, but it does allow their consumers to think their current phone is still relevant (current iPhone 4 users). On the other hand, that has to be dipping into sales somehow.

    Posted via Android Central App
    07-16-2013 11:40 AM
  3. gone down south's Avatar
    Oh, to be twenty and so sure of my place in the universe again! I love you, kid, you crack me up.

    Sent from my Nexus 4 using AC Forums mobile app
    07-16-2013 11:41 AM
  4. hallda01's Avatar
    Oh, to be twenty and so sure of my place in the universe again! I love you, kid, you crack me up.
    Yes. Dismissing me because I'm younger than you is super helpful and contributes to the discussion.
    Technosticrati likes this.
    07-16-2013 11:52 AM
  5. garublador's Avatar
    These people that hold on to a device until it breaks, as opposed to until it is old, seem much more likely to get an iPhone than one of the Android or Windows flagships lately. So my question is, do you think that these sort of consumers will drive down sales of iPhones in the long run compared to the other platforms? Should Apple change to try and attract more users who want to be on the cutting edge?
    It sounds to me as if those sort of consumers are driving iPhone sales up. I'm not sure I see where the missed out sales are coming from. Either they buy an iPhone and not upgrade it or buy an Android phone and not upgrade it. You're suggesting people that don't upgrade often are more likely to pick an iPhone so they'll fall into the first category. The first category leads to more iPhone sales, not fewer.
    07-16-2013 12:18 PM
  6. hallda01's Avatar
    The first category leads to more iPhone sales, not fewer.
    I agree in the short run. What I mean is in the long run those people won't upgrade as much, and eventually slow down sales.
    07-16-2013 12:31 PM
  7. garublador's Avatar
    I agree in the short run. What I mean is in the long run those people won't upgrade as much, and eventually slow down sales.
    But you're suggesting that people who won't upgrade anyway are buying iPhones instead of other phones, not that people who buy iPhones don't upgrade because they have iPhones. There's a big logical fallacy in your argument. Just because most people that don't upgrade a lot choose the iPhone doesn't mean that most people who choose the iPhone don't upgrade a lot.

    Apple has a pretty long history of running their device upgrades the same way they run their iPhone upgrades and they've done well with it. They still attract people that will upgrade no matter what (and they're usually pretty excited to do so because new devices are relatively infrequent). They also attract people who won't upgrade that much because they know that it will be longer before their device is viewed as obsolete. Their OS's tend to have fewer memory leaks and "rot" like Windows and earlier versions of Android so older devices tend to work better with less maintenance.

    I can see where the idea that fewer new devices and fewer paradigm changes would lead to less excitement and fewer sales. However, another thing to consider is that with fewer devices per year they also have lower R&D costs. Those costs can be pretty big compared to the margin of a unit. Their overall unit sales may be lower, but they could still take home more money becasue their R&D budget is so much lower. Technology "arms races" are expensive to maintain so there is an advantage to avoiding them if possible.
    07-16-2013 12:49 PM
  8. gone down south's Avatar
    Yes. Dismissing me because I'm younger than you is super helpful and contributes to the discussion.
    Oh, I'm not dismissing you,I take your point seriously.

    But you might want to consider that us geezers have seen more trends cone and go over the years than you can count. We stop getting excited by every new hyped product, since they're usually more marketing smoke and mirrors than substance.

    Sent from my Nexus 4 using AC Forums mobile app
    _X_ and Zero Hunter like this.
    07-16-2013 02:32 PM
  9. _X_'s Avatar
    Yes. Dismissing me because I'm younger than you is super helpful and contributes to the discussion.
    Really cmon quit taking yourself so serious it's not like this topic has any bearing on life matters.


    Now to answer your questions this applies to all things. When a person loves, fashion, cars, technology they upgrade when they can. In your example folks that love phones will upgrade when the next best thing is out. For others it's just a device and there is no need to upgrade the until the device breaks or technology significantly advances. Now as much as I like like smartphones I did not upgrade until my ideal phone came out (Note2).

    But the real killer of upgrades is the carrier lockin. If tmobile JUMP has any success you will see many more folks upgrade.


    Rocking with the Note II
    07-17-2013 02:05 PM
  10. _X_'s Avatar
    But you might want to consider that us geezers have seen more trends cone and go over the years than you can count. We stop getting excited by every new hyped product, since they're usually more marketing
    Spot on while I'm not a geezer... Working my way up, if you will, I've seen plenty of trends to know what's worth getting excited about.

    Rocking with the Note II
    07-17-2013 02:08 PM
  11. _X_'s Avatar
    Disregard
    07-17-2013 02:10 PM

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