09-15-2018 01:57 PM
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  1. Sim8's Avatar
    This is an offshoot of the thread on preferred screen sizes. The start point is that most new models don't really move things along much further and simply upgrading with every model of your preferred range each year - or 6 months, even - doesn't gain us very much.

    Great though mobile and smartphone technology is, and what is now packed into our handsets is unfathomably brilliant and complex from great manufacturers, there are only a few genuinely great models which progressed mobiles (cells) and smartphones, and propelled us into the future we now live.

    I'll offer a few here, but I'm really interested to know which phones you think really changed the game for you. It's perhaps easier to see with 20/20 hindsight, but can we learn to see through the hype and recognise a truly great advance at the moment it happens again?

    Nokia 3310, 8810, 9000, Ericsson T68, iPhone, iPhone 3, iPhone 4. But which Androids have really smashed though and were a genuine leap forward? (I mean this positively, as I know there are some crackers.)

    Si
    Morty2264 likes this.
    06-03-2018 04:01 PM
  2. Ry's Avatar
    Motorola DROID for the marketing push and making the first true competitor on Android to iPhone

    Samsung Galaxy S3 for finally getting the same design across all carriers.

    Motorola Moto X for introducing features (at the OEM-level) that everyone ended up copying (AOD) or Google threw into Android (Smart Lock/Trusted Devices).

    Motorola Moto G because it showed that the low-end doesn't have to suck.

    Google Pixel for the leap in camera quality.
    Sim8 likes this.
    06-03-2018 04:14 PM
  3. Ry's Avatar
    This is an offshoot of the thread on preferred screen sizes. The start point is that most new models don't really move things along much further and simply upgrading with every model of your preferred range each year - or 6 months, even - doesn't gain us very much.

    Great though mobile and smartphone technology is, and what is now packed into our handsets is unfathomably brilliant and complex from great manufacturers, there are only a few genuinely great models which progressed mobiles (cells) and smartphones, and propelled us into the future we now live.

    I'll offer a few here, but I'm really interested to know which phones you think really changed the game for you. It's perhaps easier to see with 20/20 hindsight, but can we learn to see through the hype and recognise a truly great advance at the moment it happens again?

    Nokia 3310, 8810, 9000, Ericsson T68, iPhone, iPhone 3, iPhone 4. But which Androids have really smashed though and were a genuine leap forward?

    Si
    From that list, I'd only pick the 3310, original iPhone, and the iPhone 4.

    RAZR V3 should get added.
    Sim8 and chanchan05 like this.
    06-03-2018 04:18 PM
  4. chanchan05's Avatar
    5110 - the phone that started the masses getting into cellphones by being affordable

    3210 - pioneered the internal antenna design.

    3310 - The phone that actually went and got the whole world connected.

    V3 - the phone that made the people realize it could be a fashion statement.

    Blackberry Curve - the phone that made people realize phones could be much more.

    Nokia N82 - the first phone IMO that made people see that phones could be decent cameras. One of the first with xenon flash and started the megapixel race.

    iPhone - the touch interface. It can't be considered the first smartphone really. At this time Symbian was way smarter.

    HTC Hero - I think this was the phone that actually put HTC in the map back then.

    Galaxy Note - pioneered the large phone

    Galaxy S3 - the phone that put Samsung in the map and kickstarted its dominance.

    Galaxy S6 - changed the premium phone language to glass on glass design instead of metal.

    iPhone 7 - removal of the headphone jack.

    iPhone X - notched design

    What to expect:
    The S9 get added if the variable aperture catches on more models and brands.
    Sim8 likes this.
    06-04-2018 05:27 AM
  5. Sim8's Avatar
    @Ry and @chanchan05 - splendid responses, especially with the explanations. Do either of you eye the tech from newer manufacturers in East Asia?
    06-04-2018 09:41 AM
  6. chanchan05's Avatar
    @Ry and @chanchan05 - splendid responses, especially with the explanations. Do either of you eye the tech from newer manufacturers in East Asia?
    I live in South East Asia. I have first hand experience on those manufacturers, like Oppo, Vivo, Cherry, Starmobile, etc.

    I'm not sure where to add the Nexus line. They showed that flagship performance can be had for a lesser price, but it's not like that really picked up. So far only one manufacturer follows that.
    Sim8 likes this.
    06-04-2018 10:04 AM
  7. Sim8's Avatar
    Brilliant, @chanchan05. There were lots of phones in the past which were leaps forward, but we didn't really get them in the West. I put the Ericsson T68 because it was the first colour screen phone the West had with the built in technology to do something with it. But I could see that NEC and Panasonic (for example) were before the T68 and could make use of the iMode system in Japan.
    06-04-2018 10:42 AM
  8. chanchan05's Avatar
    Brilliant, @chanchan05. There were lots of phones in the past which were leaps forward, but we didn't really get them in the West. I put the Ericsson T68 because it was the first colour screen phone the West had with the built in technology to do something with it. But I could see that NEC and Panasonic (for example) were before the T68 and could make use of the iMode system in Japan.
    Actually Siemes S10 in 1998 was the first phone with color display. But I don't consider that really since it really then had no benefit IMO.

    I guess you could add the Nokia 9210 communicator to my list. In 2000, before the T68, it had a 640 by 200 LCD screen that could access the web in color, play games on, it was probably the first real smartphone.

    East Asian tech makes lots of leaps forward. For example both Oppo and Vivo already have in-display fingerprint scanners. But I don't count them as leaps because they tend to be gimmicky and not really something that can be relied on regularly. Nor does the East Asian advances have altered the forward movement of the technology.

    For example, phones with analog antennae to receive RF/UHF television signals are quite common here. One would think they'd be awesome on the go. TV in whatever location or country you are in that still has free TV. But they don't get sent out West.

    If I were to add those kinds of tech into the list, my list will be a lot longer.
    Sim8 likes this.
    06-04-2018 10:52 AM
  9. Sim8's Avatar
    Yes, of course, you are right - thank you, @chanchan05. I change my 9000 to the 9210. Shhhh, don't tell anyone, but I should have known that. I was the first person in the UK to receive/send colour pictures and photos via real world (not internal manufacturer testing) WAP. And it was a T68. Which also took amazing photos for such low megapixel. The 9210 was soooo much better than the Ericsson R380.

    And I agree with you about analog TV/Radio. In fact, I think it might make a comeback in device uses, but not for a reason that is particularly optimistic.
    06-04-2018 11:21 AM
  10. tony bag o donuts's Avatar
    Treo 650. Loved that device.

    Then the Droid Incredible got me hooked on Android.
    Sim8 likes this.
    06-04-2018 04:41 PM
  11. Tsepz_GP's Avatar
    I thought the point of this thread was to name Androids, yet I am seeing loads of non-Androids being mentioned, lol.

    In terms of Androids:

    -Galaxy S2: The Display was miles ahead of all competition in terms of vividness, and the phone was so thin yet feature packed. It also came with at the time the most powerful SoC and efficient Dual core SoC.

    - Galaxy Note: It put Phablets on the map, even though we had phones like the Dell Streak before it that broke that 5imch ceiling, the Galaxy Note was the first truly successful Android Phablet.

    - Google Nexus 4 (LG): High end specs in a well priced device, this phone really helped pushed the envelope and I think sparked the idea of OnePlus and other high end devices that are decently priced.

    - HTC One M7: This phone took the idea of being built like a tank to a new level, it felt so solid in its metal uni body, and proved that Android OEMs can build some truly solid feeling devices.

    - Sony Xperia Z: If I am not mistaken this was the first truly Water and Dust Resistant Android Flagship? It took quite a few years for other OEMs to catch up and make this a standard, but Sony truly had this on lock from 2013. It was not perfect but it was better than nothing.

    - LG G2: I believe this was the Phone that pretty much started the whole Screen-To-Body Ratio race, LG did a fabulous job of putting top specs at the time with a large screen in a very well sized body due to thining the bezels as much they could at the time.

    In terms of non-Androids

    Nokia N95: The birth of the Convergence Smartphone - How anyone can leave this phone out their list is beyond me, Nokia absolutely pushed the hardest they ever have with this device. This phone carried a powerful SoC (TI OMAP 2420) with a separate GPU (PowerVR MBX), which was something that was very new in mobile devices, this allowed for truly high quality gaming as well as VGA @ 30FPS video recording, along with TV-Out, Dual Speakers, an incredible 5MP Camera that took excellent images for the time. On top of all this it brought GPS, MicroSD support that we still use to this day etc etc etc... This phone was not just a smartphone, it did everything pretty well.

    Nokia E90: the peak of keyboard drive high end smartphones - This phone was crazy expensive and for good reason, it was made of metal and high quality plastics, it felt like a weapon in hand and it had a glorious 4inch high PPI display hidden inside, once unfolded it resembled a mini laptop. Web browsing, Emails and gaming were an absolute dream on this beast, it had the same chipset as the N95 topped with double the RAM, multitasking was effortless, I've seen a few people still using it now in 2018.

    Sony Ericsson P910i: Not at all the first touch screen phone, but this was a good move towards an ever friendlier Touch UI, sadly Symbian UIQ was killed off later, butsksme great devices ran on it.

    Sony Ericsson W900i: Probably the first phone to have a GPU, Sony Ericsson went out on a limb with this high end Walkman feature phone and gave it a rather powerful (at the time) GPU, that allowed it to record and playback QVGA @ 30FPS. The GPU came from Nvidia and was known as the NVidia GoForce4800, the phone was more of an experiment and lasted on the market for about 6-7months but it showed just how good phones could be in terms of gaming and video.

    Sony Ericsson W800i & K750: these two phones proved you didn't have to break the bank to have a top phone that handled Phoning, Text, as well as Music and Photography very well, both featured great 2MP Auto Focusing cameras in their time, they took better images than some of the early and more expensive Nokia Nseries (N70 and N91), and the W800 came with a mammoth (for its time) 512MB Memory Card in the box, up until then you were lucky to get 128MB.

    Nokia N93: This was a beast of a phone, it was huge but featured an incredible 3MP Camera that supported 3x optical zoom and a camcorder mode with its flip and twist display, this was one of Nokia's first forays into convergence smartphone just before they got it right with the N95.

    Palm Pre: The master of Gesture UI, this phone with its WebOS UI came long before its time, was held back by a manufacturer who had new ideas but old school strategy of dealing with networks and logistics, what a shame. This phone was a giant leap forward. I remember wanting this device to come to South Africa so badly, but alas Palm barely got it out of the USA, a few luck countries got it, but it was poorly marketed and simply drowned in the sea of Android and iPhones. I genuinely hoped the Palm Pre would crush Android, at the time I was still on Symbian, I hated iOS due its limitations and hated Android due to just how messy it was. The Pre looked like a true Future Touch UI phone.
    chanchan05, Laura Knotek and Sim8 like this.
    06-08-2018 04:19 PM
  12. Ry's Avatar
    Motorola DROID for the marketing push and making the first true competitor on Android to iPhone

    Samsung Galaxy S3 for finally getting the same design across all carriers.

    Motorola Moto X for introducing features (at the OEM-level) that everyone ended up copying (AOD) or Google through into Android (Smart Lock/Trusted Devices).

    Motorola Moto G because it showed that the low-end doesn't have to suck.

    Google Pixel for the leap in camera quality.
    I can't believe I forgot to add the Galaxy Note.
    Sim8 and steelrain82 like this.
    06-08-2018 05:14 PM
  13. Ry's Avatar
    @Ry and @chanchan05 - splendid responses, especially with the explanations. Do either of you eye the tech from newer manufacturers in East Asia?
    I don't. Other than what Samsung does.
    Sim8 likes this.
    06-08-2018 05:16 PM
  14. Ry's Avatar
    I live in South East Asia. I have first hand experience on those manufacturers, like Oppo, Vivo, Cherry, Starmobile, etc.

    I'm not sure where to add the Nexus line. They showed that flagship performance can be had for a lesser price, but it's not like that really picked up. So far only one manufacturer follows that.
    To me, the Nexus line wasn't really a leap forward at anything. On price, Google's deep pockets - or reluctance to have a large profit margin - played into how they were priced.
    Sim8 likes this.
    06-08-2018 05:19 PM
  15. Ry's Avatar
    Palm Pre: The master of Gesture UI, this phone with its WebOS UI came long before its time, was held back by a manufacturer who had new ideas but old school strategy of dealing with networks and logistics, what a shame. This phone was a giant leap forward. I remember wanting this device to come to South Africa so badly, but alas Palm barely got it out of the USA, a few luck countries got it, but it was poorly marketed and simply drowned in the sea of Android and iPhones. I genuinely hoped the Palm Pre would crush Android, at the time I was still on Symbian, I hated iOS due its limitations and hated Android due to just how messy it was. The Pre looked like a true Future Touch UI phone.
    There's a lot of Palm Pre in later iterations of iOS and Android.

    Not sure I'd say their downfall was an "old school strategy" - it was more that Verizon picked Motorola and Google with the DROID instead of WebOS and the Palm Pre. I imagine if Verizon put that DROID marketing push behind Palm that a lot of us wouldn't be Android users today.
    Laura Knotek and Sim8 like this.
    06-08-2018 05:22 PM
  16. Tsepz_GP's Avatar
    There's a lot of Palm Pre in later iterations of iOS and Android.

    Not sure I'd say their downfall was an "old school strategy" - it was more that Verizon picked Motorola and Google with the DROID instead of WebOS and the Palm Pre. I imagine if Verizon put that DROID marketing push behind Palm that a lot of us wouldn't be Android users today.
    Weren't AT&T at the time also looking for another partner as they knew their iPhone monopoly was going to end? I just find it odd that the Pre got locked on to a single network, please do correcte if I am wrong though
    Sim8 likes this.
    06-08-2018 05:26 PM
  17. Ry's Avatar
    Weren't AT&T at the time also looking for another partner as they knew their iPhone monopoly was going to end? I just find it odd that the Pre got locked on to a single network, please do correcte if I am wrong though
    Everything I know about the WebOS and the Palm Pre launched I learned from here:

    https://www.theverge.com/2012/6/5/30...pre-postmortem
    Tsepz_GP, Laura Knotek and Sim8 like this.
    06-08-2018 05:42 PM
  18. Tsepz_GP's Avatar
    Everything I know about the WebOS and the Palm Pre launched I learned from here:

    https://www.theverge.com/2012/6/5/30...pre-postmortem
    Thanks for this Ry will make for some good weekend reading.
    06-09-2018 04:20 AM
  19. Morty2264's Avatar
    Great thread, and thank you for posting! If I were to say non-Android, I'd postulate that the BlackBerry Bold 9900 was a really good leap for BlackBerry (touchscreen with a QWERTY keyboard). If we're talking Android, then I too agree with the Pixel being a big step forward for the Google brand.

    I've also really loved the Motorola line. I think Moto has always done mid-range phones well. The Z Play was great. Awesome phone, big battery, Moto mods - all at a bargain price.
    Laura Knotek and Sim8 like this.
    06-09-2018 02:25 PM
  20. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    There's a lot of Palm Pre in later iterations of iOS and Android.

    Not sure I'd say their downfall was an "old school strategy" - it was more that Verizon picked Motorola and Google with the DROID instead of WebOS and the Palm Pre. I imagine if Verizon put that DROID marketing push behind Palm that a lot of us wouldn't be Android users today.
    Here's a good podcast about webOS. https://www.androidcentral.com/vector-44-legacy-webos
    Ry, Sim8 and Tsepz_GP like this.
    06-09-2018 03:46 PM
  21. Sim8's Avatar
    Everything I know about the WebOS and the Palm Pre launched I learned from here:

    https://www.theverge.com/2012/6/5/30...pre-postmortem
    Thanks for the link, @Ry - excellent insight. Just 31 months.

    Cheers for your posts and contributions, @tony bag o donuts, @Tsepz_GP, @Morty2264, and @Laura Knotek.
    06-10-2018 05:00 AM
  22. LeoRex's Avatar
    To me, the Nexus line wasn't really a leap forward at anything. On price, Google's deep pockets - or reluctance to have a large profit margin - played into how they were priced.
    Well, the Nexus line carried the clean OS banner through a maelstrom period where OEM builds of Android were complete dumpster fires. All of them were nightmarish abominations of poorly implemented and developed features crossthreaded on top of an operating system that had not really matured yet. It was never really about price, the Nexus 5 really skewed things there.. LG leveraged off the shelf components to help keep costs down.

    Speaking of... I'm going to throw the Nexus 5 into the list here. That phone say at a junction point and I consider it to be the first 'modern' generation phone. Android left it's adolescence with the release of KitKat, and Qualcomm had recently introduced the Snapdragon 800. The Nexus 5 combined these two to give us really the first Android phone with a fast, fluid and rock steady user experience. I remember the first time I powered mine up and started using it... It was like feasting on a perfectly cooked rib eye after a life of eating overcooked cube steak.

    It also introduced the world to HDR+, which is still head and shoulders above everyone when it comes to image processing.

    It wasn't perfect of course (wish it had the extra 900 mAh and 5mp that it's cousin the G2 had), but it illustrated for the first time that the platform had come into it's own and the fruitphone no longer had a monopoly on flagship user experience.
    Laura Knotek and Sim8 like this.
    06-10-2018 07:23 AM
  23. Ry's Avatar
    Well, the Nexus line carried the clean OS banner through a maelstrom period where OEM builds of Android were complete dumpster fires. All of them were nightmarish abominations of poorly implemented and developed features crossthreaded on top of an operating system that had not really matured yet. It was never really about price, the Nexus 5 really skewed things there.. LG leveraged off the shelf components to help keep costs down.
    For me - Nexus One was already the clean OS guideline. And the devices I used in that time period weren't really in that dumpster fire. The Motorola DROID was essentially a Nexus from the experience perspective in everything but name and the Motorola DROID BIONIC had Blur but Verizon Motorolas (or Verizon DROIDs) didn't really have the dumpter fire that was MotoBLUR on other devices.

    Speaking of... I'm going to throw the Nexus 5 into the list here. That phone say at a junction point and I consider it to be the first 'modern' generation phone. Android left it's adolescence with the release of KitKat, and Qualcomm had recently introduced the Snapdragon 800. The Nexus 5 combined these two to give us really the first Android phone with a fast, fluid and rock steady user experience. I remember the first time I powered mine up and started using it... It was like feasting on a perfectly cooked rib eye after a life of eating overcooked cube steak.

    It also introduced the world to HDR+, which is still head and shoulders above everyone when it comes to image processing.

    It wasn't perfect of course (wish it had the extra 900 mAh and 5mp that it's cousin the G2 had), but it illustrated for the first time that the platform had come into it's own and the fruitphone no longer had a monopoly on flagship user experience.
    I don't really remember the Nexus 5 being a top camera phone in that era though. iPhone 5S, Galaxy S4, LG G2 were in the conversation.
    06-11-2018 01:57 PM
  24. tube517's Avatar
    My biased opinion:

    HTC EVO 4G - Big Screen, first 4g phone (Yes, Wimax) but it was the first. And that kickstand!

    Samsung Galaxy Note - Big Screen, Stylus. Phablet.


    These 2 phones, which I both owned, made the big screen fashionable.
    Sim8 likes this.
    06-11-2018 02:42 PM
  25. LeoRex's Avatar
    I don't really remember the Nexus 5 being a top camera phone in that era though. iPhone 5S, Galaxy S4, LG G2 were in the conversation.
    It came out of the gate a mess.. lots of exposure issues and whatnot... Took a few months before it could take a decent pic. What I'm actually referring to is the launch of the Google Camera in late winter, with the introduction of HDR+, a Nexus 5 exclusive feature.. it was slow, very power hungry, but I saw the potential... Here are pics I took with HDR+ on a Nexus 5 back in 2013..



    These blew my mind... HDR+ was difficult to use because of its speed at the time, but if you had the right shot...
    Sim8 and Morty2264 like this.
    06-11-2018 05:34 PM
34 12

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