03-22-2014 08:17 PM
113 1234 ...
tools
  1. Citizen Coyote's Avatar
    Question for the OP: why did you not buy the tablet through Google itself, or a retailer with a well-documented return policy? If you were just trying to save a few bucks, then consider this an abject lesson in return and warranty policies. Every product I purchase is from a retailer with a return policy that allows for simple exchanges of defective out-of-box products; to do so any other way is inviting an unhappy experience like what you've now witnessed. I hope things are eventually resolved for you, but personally I see this as a warning against buying on reseller sites, rather than as a warning against Google or Asus products.
    03-13-2014 04:14 PM
  2. preppystud's Avatar
    most of the time, if you buy a defective product, most manufacturers ask you to send it back on your own money.

    i have sent my tablet for four repairs, they all sent me a free mailing label from fedex. but the first time, i didn't use a secure box, so i had to pay for $4 for it. i saved the mailing box since then, so i didn't pay for anything other than gasoline money.

    so it is not out of the boundary for them to ask you to pay for the shipping cost.
    03-14-2014 12:35 AM
  3. mset's Avatar
    Question for the OP: why did you not buy the tablet through Google itself, or a retailer with a well-documented return policy? If you were just trying to save a few bucks, then consider this an abject lesson in return and warranty policies. Every product I purchase is from a retailer with a return policy that allows for simple exchanges of defective out-of-box products; to do so any other way is inviting an unhappy experience like what you've now witnessed. I hope things are eventually resolved for you, but personally I see this as a warning against buying on reseller sites, rather than as a warning against Google or Asus products.
    Thanks for the responses. Let me reply to a select few.

    The reason I purchased BNIB sealed from a forum is that I had an amazing experience with my Google Nexus 4, as I stated. I assumed (wrongly, and this is my fault) that Google would stand behind this product like they did the last one.

    More about your assessment of the story below.
    03-14-2014 04:57 AM
  4. mset's Avatar

    Beyond that, you are bound by the terms of the warranty. Asus is not the only manufacturer to require you to pay shipping to them, a number of others do as well. If you do not agree with the terms of the warranty then don't buy the item and buy something else.
    Thanks for the reply. I'd like to address this issue about paying for shipping on warranty returns.

    I deal in high end audio gear. In that world, I never pay to return a product that is hardware defective out of the box.

    In the computer world, there are plenty of examples of firms that do not make you pay for shipping if your hardware is defective. Apple is the prime example, but Lenovo is another example (or they used to be the last time I bought a premium T61).

    It's fascinating to me that so many people are defending the hardware makers in a situation where a brand new item comes out of the box with (apparently several separate) hardware defects, and simply does not work. Why in the heck should I pay for shipping in this case?

    The point about buying through a retailer if you really want to avoid this problem is well taken. Still, whatever you say about Apple (and I have made it clear that I'm not a fan) they stand behind their products and if I buy one (even used, much less BNIB) privately under warranty and it fails, they don't ask me any questions, they just replace.

    In this case, to reiterate, Google is saying

    "Your product was defective right out of the box? Oh, okay. So pay to ship it to us (and yes, 'us' is Asus but I don't care who Google contracted to make their hardware). We won't replace it, we'll try to fix it. If you get it back and it still isn't working, you can pay to ship it to us again and we'll try to fix it again. What's that? You think that the fact that it was defective out of the box means that there might be an issue or issues that will be hard to even fix and you feel like you should just get a replacement unit? Oh, thanks for your feedback'.
    03-14-2014 05:03 AM
  5. mset's Avatar
    I don't think its fair for Google or Asus having to cover your return shipping cost when you didn't buy directly from them. I would only expect return shipping cost to be covered by the place I bought it from, not a different company. So in this case its the seller or shop.ca, not Google or Asus.
    Thanks for the response. I disagree but many here seem to agree.

    However, if a seller sent something for free shipping, then two things are fair when you have to return the item: either the buyer pay for the return shipping cost. Or the seller cover the cost, but will subtract that cost out of the total of the refund. This is what Amazon does, when you return an item and print out a shipping label they will subtract the cost from the refund total. Or you can choose to ship at your own cost, then they will refund fully..
    I totally reject this. If I buy a product from an electronics firm, and it comes out of the box busted, I don't care if they paid to ship it to me. It's a total fail and I expect them to pay to retrieve their busted item and try to send me one that works. In addition, it is very strange to me that so many people are suggesting that the retailer is responsible for all this.What does the retailer have to do with it? If they have a returns policy with free shipping, that's great (and I do a lot of business thorugh a Canadian store called Future Shop precisely because I can return stuff easily), but I bet they have an arrangement with the manufacturer to claw some of that back in case of defects.

    By the way, I have bought a lot of stuff off Amazon and returned one item. I did not pay for any shipping. Maybe I got lucky.

    I look at the manufacturer to stand behind a product, and this is where it seems to me that Google is shucking and jiving. I do not consider Asus involved in this any more than I consider Foxconn involved in my Apple purchases. I realize the situation is slightly different, but not enough to make that much of a difference. It's the Google name on this product. It's a Google tablet, not an Asus tablet.
    03-14-2014 05:12 AM
  6. mset's Avatar
    Was it buggy out of the box? How would we know?
    You know because I told you. If you reject the premise of the OP (that Google should stand behind a BNIB sealed item that comes out of the box hardware defective) because you contend that there's no way to know if it was actually defective (and/or BNIB sealed and never opened or registered) because this is an internet forum and I can say whatever I want, I'm not sure if there would ever be a point to responding to any post like this, because that could be said about most every post here.

    But then again... I just saw your screen name!

    : )
    Aquila likes this.
    03-14-2014 05:16 AM
  7. mset's Avatar
    My last comment in this series of responses.

    It's clear to me that I did not have the right information going into this, and in this sense it's my fault. There are three separate stories going on here. There's one about a 21st century hardware maker doing business in a new way by marketing things directly to customers without the use of brick and mortar stores, and a concurrent one about the same firm acting as a trad hardware maker and retailing through third parties, whether they're B & M or online. Then there's another one about the firm that was contracted by the hardware maker to execute their design acting as a retailer as well!

    I still feel that this is a cautionary tale. I personally have learned a lesson, and that is that when buying from a B & S forum, which I love to do and have done literally hundreds of times, saving probably thousands of dollars with almost no problems, I will be extra vigilant about asking all the questions that arose as a result of this experience.

    Also still a total fail on the part of Google to stand behind their product, in my view.
    03-14-2014 05:29 AM
  8. mrsmumbles's Avatar
    Neither Google nor Asus can be held responsible for a unit which is sold by a private 3rd party. Anything could have happened to it from the time that person received it, such as leaving it overnight in freezing conditions, or accidentally leaving it near a heat source.

    The entity who directly sells you a product is responsible for you receiving that product in acceptable condition. Without a warranty, the manufacturers rightfully have no real responsibility to you. If they did, they'd be on the losing end with unscrupulous people looking for replacements and special accommodations which would ultimately make it unworthwhile to stay in business.

    Just a thought but, it sounds like you return quite a lot of various types of electronics, I've only ever returned one item in my life, a cassette Walkman 35 years ago. Maybe, as in the Twilight Zone episode, machines hate you? J/k!

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk 2
    03-14-2014 05:48 AM
  9. mset's Avatar
    Neither Google nor Asus can be held responsible for a unit which is sold by a private 3rd party.
    Not sure how many more times I will have to say this, but there are plenty of examples of premium hardware makers whose warranty protection travels with the machine and is independent of who is actually holding the machine. With Apple, as long as the unit is not in their system as stolen, and it has a hardware defect, they will honour warranty no matter who brings it in, with no receipt required.

    If anything, the argument can be made that an iPad is $450 and this tablet is $219, and you get what you pay for.

    Just a thought but, it sounds like you return quite a lot of various types of electronics, I've only ever returned one item in my life, a cassette Walkman 35 years ago. Maybe, as in the Twilight Zone episode, machines hate you? J/k!
    Sounds like you're one of those passive aggressive types who likes to accuse and then end with a 'just kidding' as if that makes it okay. Your statement is nonsense. You have no idea what my purchase/return ratio is. But given that you bought a Walkman 35 years ago, I'm guessing that you're a curmudgeonly old (probably man) who's perpetually in a bad mood. J/K!!

    News flash for you - hardware sometimes goes down.
    03-14-2014 06:23 AM
  10. mrsmumbles's Avatar
    Not sure how many more times I will have to say this, but there are plenty of examples of premium hardware makers whose warranty protection travels with the machine and is independent of who is actually holding the machine. With Apple, as long as the unit is not in their system as stolen, and it has a hardware defect, they will honour warranty no matter who brings it in, with no receipt required.

    If anything, the argument can be made that an iPad is $450 and this tablet is $219, and you get what you pay for.



    Sounds like you're one of those passive aggressive types who likes to accuse and then end with a 'just kidding' as if that makes it okay. Your statement is nonsense. You have no idea what my purchase/return ratio is. But given that you bought a Walkman 35 years ago, I'm guessing that you're a curmudgeonly old (probably man) who's perpetually in a bad mood. J/K!!

    News flash for you - hardware sometimes goes down.
    I'm not sure what the hardware manufacturer is meant to do other than what they did in this case, offer to repair it.

    The shipping label thing is your responsibility because you are the owner of that property and you have no warranty. If I have a garage sale, and you buy an old toaster from my sale, and find out it only burns toast, if I'm nice you'll get a refund from me. The company who made the toaster has long since washed their hands of the toaster because the toaster has had a life of its own, so to speak, since leaving them.

    If Apple chooses to "insure" their products forever, no matter how many times a device has changed hands and no matter the history of it out in the world after manufacture, well maybe that's why their prices are so high.

    I think you have an unrealistic expectation set of what you're owed in the world.

    As for me being passive aggressive, maybe. It did irritate me to read in more than one of your posts up thread that you habitually return electronics. If you buy 50 items and return 10, or even 5, that seems excessive to me. In my experience, products generally do what they were made to do. That may not be the case for you.

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk 2
    03-14-2014 06:41 AM
  11. dpham00's Avatar
    Not sure how many more times I will have to say this, but there are plenty of examples of premium hardware makers whose warranty protection travels with the machine and is independent of who is actually holding the machine. With Apple, as long as the unit is not in their system as stolen, and it has a hardware defect, they will honour warranty no matter who brings it in, with no receipt required.

    Every company has a different policy. Apple's warranty policy is really best in the industry. And if warranty policy is your highest priority then apple would be your best bet. Other tablet and smartphone manufacturers aren't at that level.


    dpham00, Android Central Moderator
    Sent from my Verizon Samsung Galaxy Note 3 via Tapatalk Pro
    03-14-2014 10:15 AM
  12. jerrykur's Avatar
    I totally reject this. If I buy a product from an electronics firm, and it comes out of the box busted, I don't care if they paid to ship it to me. It's a total fail and I expect them to pay to retrieve their busted item and try to send me one that works. In addition, it is very strange to me that so many people are suggesting that the retailer is responsible for all this.What does the retailer have to do with it? If they have a returns policy with free shipping, that's great (and I do a lot of business thorugh a Canadian store called Future Shop precisely because I can return stuff easily), but I bet they have an arrangement with the manufacturer to claw some of that back in case of defects.
    The retailer is the one that took your money and sold you the goods so your first recourse should be the retailer. The retailer is the one that presented the item as BNIB and implied that the device was operational. If it turns out that the device does not work the retailer should refund your money or provide you a new unit.

    What do you do when you buy something from Amazon or Future Shop that turns out to be defective. Do you send it back to manufacturer or to retailer, Amazon or Future shop?
    03-14-2014 10:48 AM
  13. dpham00's Avatar
    Also I don't know what the policies are in Canada, but in the US, if you buy a carrier branded device then that carrier would should support it. I have verizon and have had issues on some devices. Verizon sent me a replacement right away and a prepaid label to send back my defective device

    dpham00, Android Central Moderator
    Sent from my Verizon Samsung Galaxy Note 3 via Tapatalk Pro
    03-14-2014 10:50 AM
  14. sethgoldstein's Avatar
    Why not just return it?

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk
    03-14-2014 12:52 PM
  15. gnr_2's Avatar
    When you buy $2500 in a year. But actually I think they changed it to elite and elite plus giving you 30 and 45 days return period.

    https://my.bestbuy.com/benefits


    dpham00, Android Central Moderator
    Sent from my Verizon Samsung Galaxy Note 3 via Tapatalk Pro
    It went up to $3500 last year I was told.

    Sent from my Nexus 7 using AC Forums mobile app
    03-14-2014 05:03 PM
  16. Haalcyon's Avatar
    I only buy products from places that have good return policies because if I don't love it for any reason whatsoever it's going back. I feel bad for the OP and I'm sure a lesson has been learned. I like Asus motherboards and computer parts but their tablets have left me disappointed.


    4 of IV
    03-14-2014 05:49 PM
  17. Wildo6882's Avatar
    Here's a question to the Amazon purchasers:

    If you buy a Nexus 7 from Amazon and something goes wrong after their 30 day return policy, what is your recourse? Would you have to then deal with Asus, or does Amazon back you up for longer?

    Been thinking about getting an LTE version, and Amazon would save me about $40 over Google Play, but I'd rather not deal with Asus directly if I don't have to. Thanks!
    03-14-2014 09:49 PM
  18. Haalcyon's Avatar
    Here's a question to the Amazon purchasers:

    If you buy a Nexus 7 from Amazon and something goes wrong after their 30 day return policy, what is your recourse? Would you have to then deal with Asus, or does Amazon back you up for longer?

    Been thinking about getting an LTE version, and Amazon would save me about $40 over Google Play, but I'd rather not deal with Asus directly if I don't have to. Thanks!
    I might be worth the $40 (it definitely would be to me) to go through Google and not even have to wonder or ask that question.


    4 of IV
    mrsmumbles and Wildo6882 like this.
    03-14-2014 10:18 PM
  19. brosko's Avatar
    Here's a question to the Amazon purchasers:

    If you buy a Nexus 7 from Amazon and something goes wrong after their 30 day return policy, what is your recourse? Would you have to then deal with Asus, or does Amazon back you up for longer?

    Been thinking about getting an LTE version, and Amazon would save me about $40 over Google Play, but I'd rather not deal with Asus directly if I don't have to. Thanks!
    After 30 days your outta luck with amazon unless you buy the square trade warranty.
    amazon is great though for out of the box defects.
    Wildo6882 likes this.
    03-14-2014 10:22 PM
  20. Wildo6882's Avatar
    I might be worth the $40 (it definitely would be to me) to go through Google and not even have to wonder or ask that question.


    4 of IV
    After 30 days your outta luck with amazon unless you buy the square trade warranty.
    amazon is great though for out of the box defects.
    Thanks to both of you.

    Amazon doesn't cover anything at all after 30 days? Not even out of box, not user error, issues?
    03-14-2014 10:39 PM
  21. Haalcyon's Avatar
    Thanks to both of you.

    Amazon doesn't cover anything at all after 30 days? Not even out of box, not user error, issues?
    I'm sorry I doona know.


    4 of IV
    03-14-2014 10:41 PM
  22. mset's Avatar
    The retailer is the one that took your money and sold you the goods so your first recourse should be the retailer. The retailer is the one that presented the item as BNIB and implied that the device was operational. If it turns out that the device does not work the retailer should refund your money or provide you a new unit.

    What do you do when you buy something from Amazon or Future Shop that turns out to be defective. Do you send it back to manufacturer or to retailer, Amazon or Future shop?
    I understand your point about retailers, but I think that applies to brick and mortar retailers.

    Nowadays, we are dealing with many types of retailing entities. Manufacturers as retailers, B & M stores, online retailers and there are other sources to buy BNIB unused items as well. In answer to your question about what I do when I buy something at Amazon or Future Shop, it depends what it is. If it's an Apple item, I contact Apple first. Same with Lenovo.

    If a retailer sells you a BNIB device, are they really 'implying that it's operational'? I'm not so sure. How does a retailer know what's operational and what's not among the thousands of devices sitting on his shelves? Does he failure test 1 in every 25 units for every piece he sells in order to maintain a database of potential failure rate? Of course not. The retailer is a conduit between the manufacturer and the buyer. Ultimate responsibility for a product lies with the manufacturer, not the retailer.

    Big box stores like Future Shop or Amazon (very big box) provide returns as a courtesy, and that's great. But the primary responsibility for a piece of gear is the maker, in my view.

    In this case, there's a weird thing going on where the 'maker' Google contracted the making of the unit out to a hardware sub-contractor, who is now also selling the unit on a retail level! But it's still a Google tablet.
    03-14-2014 11:19 PM
  23. mset's Avatar
    I'm not sure what the hardware manufacturer is meant to do other than what they did in this case, offer to repair it.
    If it's brand new and it doesn't work out of the box, they are meant to replace it and pay for the shipping necessary. This is self-evident.

    The shipping label thing is your responsibility because you are the owner of that property and you have no warranty
    I have no warranty if I deal with certain companies. In this case, as I stated, I made the mistake of assuming that I would be dealt with by Google in the same way as I was dealt with the last time by Google - that is, I assumed they would warranty replace my defective unit and pay for all shipping like they did the last time.

    If I have a garage sale, and you buy an old toaster from my sale, and find out it only burns toast, if I'm nice you'll get a refund from me. The company who made the toaster has long since washed their hands of the toaster because the toaster has had a life of its own, so to speak, since leaving them.
    Unfortunately, this example has nothing to do with the situation we are talking about. We're talking about a piece of hardware that is still under warranty.

    I think you have an unrealistic expectation set of what you're owed in the world.
    I think I have an altogether reasonable expectation that if I pay $200 for a tablet, I am owed a tablet that works when I unbox it. Not a refurb to replace a brand new defective $200 tablet, and not a bill for shipping the defective tablet back to the people that made it.
    brosko likes this.
    03-14-2014 11:25 PM
  24. Aquila's Avatar
    In this case, there's a weird thing going on where the 'maker' Google contracted the making of the unit out to a hardware sub-contractor, who is now also selling the unit on a retail level! But it's still a Google tablet.
    I think this is contrary to how they look at it. Google is supplying the Nexus software and has design input, but the Nexus devices are made by OEM's who bid on the right to make it. This is fully an Asus tablet that Google has an outlet to sell (the Play Store). If you buy from Best Buy and Best Buy's return/repair policy doesn't cover something, you deal with Asus 100% of the time. The only circumstance that Google becomes involved is if the product was purchased directly from Google. In this way, I think it's more accurate to put Google in same place as Amazon (the retailer) in your example, with ultimate hardware responsibility falling back to Asus if the retailer or reseller (Google, Staples, Verizon, Game Stop, Best Buy, etc) isn't able to resolve through their normal processes.
    B. Diddy, mrsmumbles and dpham00 like this.
    03-14-2014 11:29 PM
  25. dpham00's Avatar
    I think I have an altogether reasonable expectation that if I pay $200 for a tablet, I am owed a tablet that works when I unbox it. Not a refurb to replace a brand new defective $200 tablet, and not a bill for shipping the defective tablet back to the people that made it.
    You are entitled to a new device exchange during the return period. After that, you would have to go through warranty service.

    If you feel that the nexus 7 warranty does not meet your warranty expectations then perhaps you should choose a device that does


    dpham00, Android Central Moderator
    Sent from my Verizon Samsung Galaxy Note 3 via Tapatalk Pro
    gnr_2 and mrsmumbles like this.
    03-15-2014 01:15 AM
113 1234 ...

Similar Threads

  1. Nexus 5: died and it won't turn on
    By JConn_Lefty in forum Google Nexus 5
    Replies: 33
    Last Post: 07-30-2016, 03:44 PM
  2. Is a light bleed normal?
    By Nuuq in forum Google Nexus 5
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 03-21-2014, 12:54 PM
  3. non-nexus 7 compatible app actually works?
    By preppystud in forum Google Nexus 7 Tablet (2013)
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 03-13-2014, 10:57 AM
  4. Any updates on Sprint Spark support for Nexus 5?
    By Gaurav in forum Google Nexus 5
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-11-2014, 10:25 PM
  5. Using Wi-Fi Direct on Nexus 7
    By Tabby01 in forum Google Nexus 7 Tablet (2012)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-11-2014, 09:43 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD