11-05-2017 12:15 AM
30 12
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  1. nelamvr6's Avatar
    https://www.androidcentral.com/googl...lay-complaints

    How in the world could this possibly be actionable when Google will refund anyone's money who isn't happy with their phone if they return it within the trial period? And that's not even considering the 2 year warranty!

    The mind boggles...
    11-02-2017 12:54 PM
  2. Mike Dee's Avatar
    11-02-2017 12:57 PM
  3. hal1's Avatar
    exactly. You get a warranty, you get things fixed, you don't get to sue cuz something didn't work the way you wanted it to. or you return it. You don't go to a restaurant, take the first bite of a steak, tell yourself it's terrible burnt and impossible to eat, finish the entire meal and then tell them you don't want to pay
    nelamvr6 likes this.
    11-02-2017 01:01 PM
  4. vansmack's Avatar
    Because, lawyers.
    11-02-2017 02:45 PM
  5. billchat's Avatar
    Because, lawyers.
    TRUTH!
    11-02-2017 03:31 PM
  6. vzwuser76's Avatar
    https://www.androidcentral.com/googl...lay-complaints

    How in the world could this possibly be actionable when Google will refund anyone's money who isn't happy with their phone if they return it within the trial period? And that's not even considering the 2 year warranty!

    The mind boggles...
    Add to that the fact that they're including the Pixel 2 for the clicking/whine issue during a call. I don't have it, and it doesn't sound like that many others do either. And the stupid thing is, each person who enters into this class action suit will, if they win, most likely get a single figure payout. The lawyers on the other hand...

    At this rate, any little defect is going to end up in a class action lawsuit anytime a phone gets launched, which will drive up the costs of devices more than they already are. And consumers will get a cup of coffee for their troubles.
    nelamvr6 likes this.
    11-02-2017 05:25 PM
  7. cbreze's Avatar
    Lawyers were not allowed to advertise years ago. Never should have allowed that to change. And, yes to driving up costs, as that is exactly what happens.
    billchat and nelamvr6 like this.
    11-02-2017 05:32 PM
  8. mmcclure0453's Avatar
    Well, this doesn't surprise me too much. We live in a time where you can order a hot coffee through a drive-thru, spill the coffee on yourself, and then sue the supplier of the hot coffee that YOU ordered and YOU spilled because the coffee was hot....! Boggles the mind.
    nelamvr6 and DMP89145 like this.
    11-02-2017 07:36 PM
  9. Chex313's Avatar
    In some parts the pronunciation of Lawyer is Liar...
    mmcclure0453 likes this.
    11-02-2017 08:22 PM
  10. firebirder's Avatar
    They are just jumping on the bandwagon. They know someone is stupid enough to sign up, actually multiple someone's, and they (the lawyers) will make a killing on a settlement while the consumer with get very little. We live in a society where people try to sue for EVERYTHING. Hell, a lady who spilled coffee (she ordered) on herself got $2.5+ million.
    11-02-2017 09:02 PM
  11. hal1's Avatar
    They are just jumping on the bandwagon. They know someone is stupid enough to sign up, actually multiple someone's, and they (the lawyers) will make a killing on a settlement while the consumer with get very little. We live in a society where people try to sue for EVERYTHING. Hell, a lady who spilled coffee (she ordered) on herself got $2.5+ million.
    I wish people would know the facts of the story before commenting on it. McDonald's had a history, and there have been hundreds of previous instances in which they were told they had to make changes, they refused to do so, they were serving coffee at a temperature well above what is accepted. This is not a case of the woman getting Millions, just a case of McDonald's not being told what they were supposed to do. Please everybody read up on what the story is really about
    BBook1999 likes this.
    11-02-2017 10:26 PM
  12. mmcclure0453's Avatar
    I read the story. And while this may not be the best example of a frivolous lawsuit (even though I am wowed by the amount awarded) the fact remains that most people are "sue happy". People will sue for about anything. Suing Google over the Pixel 2 XL is ridiculous! But, as stated by another, people will jump on board.
    11-02-2017 10:47 PM
  13. nelamvr6's Avatar
    I wish people would know the facts of the story before commenting on it. McDonald's had a history, and there have been hundreds of previous instances in which they were told they had to make changes, they refused to do so, they were serving coffee at a temperature well above what is accepted. This is not a case of the woman getting Millions, just a case of McDonald's not being told what they were supposed to do. Please everybody read up on what the story is really about
    I have read the story, and it's total BS. Coffee is properly extracted at close to boiling. between 195 and 205 F is the proper temperature for brewing coffee, according to the National Coffee Association and the Specialty Coffee Association of America. Just because that ***** lawyer stated that coffee should be served at 140 degrees F does not make it true, not even a little. I suspect that if you were served coffee at 140 degrees F at a restaurant you would send it back and ask for a hot cup.

    Please explain to me your contention that McDonald's served its coffee too hot. How is it possible that people are still repeating that tripe? McDonald's did nothing wrong. It is unfortunate that that woman got burned, but she got burned because of her own stupid actions. Period.
    GPuba and mmcclure0453 like this.
    11-02-2017 11:36 PM
  14. chyeo1979's Avatar
    Anything and everything can be sued in America
    nelamvr6 and modifier like this.
    11-03-2017 02:46 AM
  15. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    Welcome to the world of lawyers.

    They see an issue, they ask owners to speak up so they can sue and earn bucks in legal fees.
    11-03-2017 08:55 AM
  16. Morty2264's Avatar
    Very odd. I mean, I understand the frustration and of course the inconvenience of customers who have affected devices... But Google will freely give out refunds; and there is now an awesome warranty period on the phone... And, I can't believe I'm saying this, but here goes...

    It's just a phone.

    Lawsuits should absolutely happen with situations like medications, injury, etc. ... But when it's a phone with a defective screen, I just don't see the point.
    nelamvr6 and mmcclure0453 like this.
    11-03-2017 09:30 AM
  17. Aquila's Avatar
    https://www.androidcentral.com/googl...lay-complaints

    How in the world could this possibly be actionable when Google will refund anyone's money who isn't happy with their phone if they return it within the trial period? And that's not even considering the 2 year warranty!

    The mind boggles...
    Today, November 3rd, 100% of Pixels are still within the return period. This is more than ridiculous.
    11-03-2017 10:26 AM
  18. Golfdriver97's Avatar
    This shouldn't even be entertained by any judge. The phones are still within return periods. If this say happened after several months and Someone was using second rate panels to repair phones, then yes, I can see this happening.
    nelamvr6 and DMP89145 like this.
    11-04-2017 10:44 AM
  19. AustinIllini's Avatar
    This shouldn't even be entertained by any judge. The phones are still within return periods. If this say happened after several months and Someone was using second rate panels to repair phones, then yes, I can see this happening.
    It has been said already, but this is textbook ambulance chasing. If we get real burn in a couple of months from now and Google refuses to address or concerns, that's one thing, but this is just nonsense
    11-04-2017 11:18 AM
  20. L0n3N1nja's Avatar
    Because the American legal system and lawsuits have become the joke of the world. I mean seriously, we need to put warnings on cups to warn customers their hot coffee is hot.

    This lawsuit shouldn't even go to court, you can't sue because you don't like a phone, you simply return it and buy something else. These legal fees only add to the cost of making and selling phones.
    nelamvr6 and mmcclure0453 like this.
    11-04-2017 11:28 AM
  21. Robisan's Avatar
    Lawyers were not allowed to advertise years ago. Never should have allowed that to change.
    The First Amendment, how does it work?
    11-04-2017 11:41 AM
  22. darkmanx2g's Avatar
    It's wasting other people's time and money to sue a company for a device that didn't affect safety or any monetary damages. 2 year warranty and the phone barely came out every single handset is still under returnable period.
    11-04-2017 01:05 PM
  23. cbreze's Avatar
    The First Amendment, how does it work?
    If you're saying it was a First Amendment thing than it had been out of whack for at least 200 years prior. As I recall I don't think doctors could advertise either. Maybe they should let judges advertise. See where that gets us.
    Too many people are swayed by slick attorney advertisements. Ambulance Chasers come out of the woodwork. Someone who needs an attorney should hunt them out not the other way around.
    mmcclure0453 likes this.
    11-04-2017 02:03 PM
  24. Robisan's Avatar
    If you're saying it was a First Amendment thing than it had been out of whack for at least 200 years prior. As I recall I don't think doctors could advertise either. Maybe they should let judges advertise. See where that gets us.
    Too many people are swayed by slick attorney advertisements. Ambulance Chasers come out of the woodwork. Someone who needs an attorney should hunt them out not the other way around.
    The government has never prohibited advertising by individuals or businesses in private sector media.

    "Someone who needs an attorney..." Gee, how is someone who doesn't know the law and/or all of their legal rights supposed to know exactly when they need or could benefit from legal counsel?
    11-04-2017 06:29 PM
  25. cbreze's Avatar
    The government has never prohibited advertising by individuals or businesses in private sector media.

    "Someone who needs an attorney..." Gee, how is someone who doesn't know the law and/or all of their legal rights supposed to know exactly when they need or could benefit from legal counsel?
    This what I was referring to:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legal_..._United_States

    And Gee, when I last needed an attorney I called him up and made an appointment. I didn't check out the adds on TV to see what deals were going on or special sales on legal advice. It used to be considered unethical by the ABA for an attorney to advertise. The last thing an attorney wants to be seen as is unethical. In 1977 Supreme Court changed that and the ABA relaxed their ethics on the matter.
    11-04-2017 07:24 PM
30 12

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