1. TraderGary's Avatar
    02-11-2019 11:47 PM
  2. DMP89145's Avatar
    Good OP-ED.
    02-12-2019 12:13 AM
  3. Mike Dee's Avatar
    Good OP-ED.
    Yet some will argue that timely updates aren't important.....usually those with brands that can't get them.
    DMP89145 and TraderGary like this.
    02-12-2019 07:58 AM
  4. DMP89145's Avatar
    Yet some will argue that timely updates aren't important.....usually those with brands that can't get them.
    You're right. That or sometimes they'll lay blame on Google even though it's their OEM not taking action.
    02-12-2019 08:53 AM
  5. mustang7757's Avatar
    My Samsung and 1+6 devices are right now January security patch , so they usually about couple weeks behind my pixels in that regard .
    02-12-2019 08:54 AM
  6. Jeremy8000's Avatar
    Being ok your OEM's failure to deliver timely security updates is like being ok with an accountant fail to take new tax laws into account when they're preparing your taxes. You might not be affected, but you really, really don't want to deal with the implications if you are.
    02-12-2019 09:30 AM
  7. Almeuit's Avatar
    Yep. This is why I am either Pixel or iPhone. Bugs can happen but patches actually come whereas with others.. they could come .. and you could be sitting on December patch while it is mid February.
    mustang7757, DMP89145 and J Dubbs like this.
    02-12-2019 03:22 PM
  8. Ry's Avatar
    I don't mind not being on the exact month patch. It's going to take a real exploit for me to care as much as the article author.

    I mean obviously, I'm not likely to use a phone as my daily driver that's a year out of date when it comes to security patch level. But I'm content with my Motorola Moto Z2 Play (a June 2017 device), sitting on the Dec 2018 patch level while today is February 13, 2019.

    Google's got a program and list of recommended devices for Enterprise-Level (which, let's be honest, is usually "tougher" than "consumer-level").

    https://forums.androidcentral.com/ge...ml#post6272262

    In my household, we've got three active Android devices: Google Pixel 2 XL, Motorola Moto Z2 Play (Verizon), and an Nvidia SHIELD TV.

    Pixel 2 XL: Feb 2019
    Moto Z2 Play: Dec 2018
    SHIELD TV: Nov 2018

    To me, this is OK.
    mustang7757 likes this.
    02-13-2019 04:13 PM
  9. Ry's Avatar
    You're right. That or sometimes they'll lay blame on Google even though it's their OEM not taking action.
    Blame Google for recommending being only behind by 90 days for the enterprise-level and not making monthly a requirement to use Play Services.
    mustang7757 likes this.
    02-13-2019 04:14 PM
  10. bryantj3303's Avatar

    Based on the reading I've done, I thought that the real problem was the individual user. Malware and viruses would access the phone via a download or clicking a weblink. Also, if Google Play has been activated, then it will scan the aps for viruses.

    While I agree that the manufacturers need to do a better job with keeping their phones up-to-date, my impression was that the weakest link is the user with respect as to what is downloaded, and from where (i.e. outside the Google Play store).

    Someone please educate me if I'm mis-informed.
    02-13-2019 07:27 PM
  11. DMP89145's Avatar
    Blame Google for recommending being only behind by 90 days for the enterprise-level and not making monthly a requirement to use Play Services.
    How so? if Google hadn't even established that as a minimum, OEM's would be even further behind than 90 days. Still, the code is out and available upon release every month. OEM's just don't want to put their resources to support doing better.
    02-13-2019 08:53 PM
  12. Mike Dee's Avatar
    Based on the reading I've done, I thought that the real problem was the individual user. Malware and viruses would access the phone via a download or clicking a weblink. Also, if Google Play has been activated, then it will scan the aps for viruses.

    While I agree that the manufacturers need to do a better job with keeping their phones up-to-date, my impression was that the weakest link is the user with respect as to what is downloaded, and from where (i.e. outside the Google Play store).

    Someone please educate me if I'm mis-informed.
    I wouldn't always blame the user because there are things that are unavoidable. Even the Play Store can be risky.
    02-13-2019 08:53 PM
  13. mustang7757's Avatar
    I wouldn't always blame the user because there are things that are unavoidable. Even the Play Store can be risky.
    True , Google can do so much some will slip by.
    02-13-2019 09:04 PM
  14. mustang7757's Avatar
    How so? if Google hadn't even established that as a minimum, OEM's would be even further behind than 90 days. Still, the code is out and available upon release every month. OEM's just don't want to put their resources to support doing better.
    Google phones yeah, but their software and play store policy need to be more strict with manufacturers
    02-13-2019 09:05 PM
  15. DMP89145's Avatar
    Google phones yeah, but their software and play store policy need to be more strict with manufacturers
    Why is that? Google releases the code on time and every month. It's there for every OEM to get. Now, the way I'm reading that is Google has done all it can do, it's up to the OEM to take some initiative and take care of their customers at that point.
    mustang7757 and TraderGary like this.
    02-13-2019 09:20 PM
  16. Ry's Avatar
    Why is that? Google releases the code on time and every month. It's there for every OEM to get. Now, the way I'm reading that is Google has done all it can do, it's up to the OEM to take some initiative and take care of their customers at that point.
    Google isn’t mandating that all phones (with Play Services) require monthly support for security patches. That’s on Google. If an OEM didn’t want to do monthly, they don’t have to. They already have the customer’s money.

    From Google, 90 days (essentially quarterly) is one of the requirements for “good enough for enterprise”.

    If you want OEMs to change, speak with your wallet and lobby Google to make monthly required.

    My point is that Google is not mandating any security updates. If monthly updates are high on your list, then buy a phone that offers that service. Personally, if Google says 90 days is what’s needed to be “enterprise-ready”, then 90 days is OK to me even if the patches are released monthly.
    02-13-2019 09:39 PM
  17. DMP89145's Avatar
    Google isn’t mandating that all phones (with Play Services) require monthly support for security patches. That’s on Google. If an OEM didn’t want to do monthly, they don’t have to. They already have the customer’s money.

    From Google, 90 days (essentially quarterly) is one of the requirements for “good enough for enterprise”.

    If you want OEMs to change, speak with your wallet and lobby Google to make monthly required.

    My point is that Google is not mandating any security updates. If monthly updates are high on your list, then buy a phone that offers that service. Personally, if Google says 90 days is what’s needed to be “enterprise-ready”, then 90 days is OK to me even if the patches are released monthly.
    Okay. i get that. I guess my point is the minimum is just that... the minimum. Google doesn't have to force Essential to keep their devices up to date. Essential proactively chooses to do that for their customers. If they can do it then, IMO, OEM's are choosing the minimum path and that's on them.

    Google has puts the code out. OEM's can either choose to update OR let that pass. It's like putting food on the table. You can't decide to not eat, with food in front of you, and then say it's the kitchen's fault that you're hungry.
    02-13-2019 09:53 PM
  18. mustang7757's Avatar
    Why is that? Google releases the code on time and every month. It's there for every OEM to get. Now, the way I'm reading that is Google has done all it can do, it's up to the OEM to take some initiative and take care of their customers at that point.
    Google is the software provider to android manufacturers, it sets rules how they can code them but not how to protect users and their data,privacy , they should be strict on manufacturers security patches . I blame both manufacturers and Google for this
    DMP89145 likes this.
    02-13-2019 09:56 PM
  19. DMP89145's Avatar
    Google is the software provider to android manufacturers, it sets rules how they can code them but not how to protect users and their data,privacy , they should be strict on manufacturers security patches . I blame both manufacturers and Google for this
    If Essential can do it, why can't they all? I don't see how Google can be held responsible. They've done all the work and put the code out. IMO, OEM's are the ones at fault for not protecting their customers. The code is there, go get it!
    mustang7757 likes this.
    02-13-2019 10:13 PM
  20. mustang7757's Avatar
    If Essential can do it, why can't they all? I don't see how Google can be held responsible. They've done all the work and put the code out. IMO, OEM's are the ones at fault for not protecting their customers. The code is there, go get it!
    Because we still using Google software and services they should protect us even if manufacturers dont want to in timely manner. They have the leverage .
    02-13-2019 10:39 PM
  21. chanchan05's Avatar
    I think pretty much everybody not named Google has to take part of the blame.
    I pretty much would blame carriers in a certain number of situations. I'm pretty sure for example it's not Samsung's fault, that some carrier's Notes are on the December security patch but ATT Notes haven't had a patch since August.
    However, it's also not the carrier's fault that the G7 One is on Pie but the G7 ThinQ is just about to enter Pie beta.
    I'd say it's a case to case basis.
    Personally I'm fine with delayed OS updates if the manufacturer provides security patches in the interim of the delay, although it depends on the manufacturer as well. The heavier skin you have, the longer an update is going to take. Which is why I can give a sort of pass on Samsung and Huawei for releasing Pie for all after 3-4 mos of Google's release especially with all the stuff they have on top, but couldn't understand why something like the Nokia 8 Sirocco which has very light to almost no skin take that long to get an OS update. Nokia should have been up there with OnePlus and Sony to get updates quickest because they have the lightest skins.
    In the same light, if Huawei and Samsung can release their really heavy skinned updates in like 2-4 months (IIRC both released in Dec 2018 after beta), and security patches within a week or 2 of Google, why can't LG do it with a slightly less heavy skin?
    There are manufacturers who do good with their updates, and some who don't, then we have middle man bodies like carriers further muddying the waters.
    mustang7757 and DMP89145 like this.
    02-13-2019 11:24 PM
  22. mustang7757's Avatar
    I think pretty much everybody not named Google has to take part of the blame.
    I pretty much would blame carriers in a certain number of situations. I'm pretty sure for example it's not Samsung's fault, that some carrier's Notes are on the December security patch but ATT Notes haven't had a patch since August.
    However, it's also not the carrier's fault that the G7 One is on Pie but the G7 ThinQ is just about to enter Pie beta.
    I'd say it's a case to case basis.
    Personally I'm fine with delayed OS updates if the manufacturer provides security patches in the interim of the delay, although it depends on the manufacturer as well. The heavier skin you have, the longer an update is going to take. Which is why I can give a sort of pass on Samsung and Huawei for releasing Pie for all after 3-4 mos of Google's release especially with all the stuff they have on top, but couldn't understand why something like the Nokia 8 Sirocco which has very light to almost no skin take that long to get an OS update. Nokia should have been up there with OnePlus and Sony to get updates quickest because they have the lightest skins.
    In the same light, if Huawei and Samsung can release their really heavy skinned updates in like 2-4 months (IIRC both released in Dec 2018 after beta), and security patches within a week or 2 of Google, why can't LG do it with a slightly less heavy skin?
    There are manufacturers who do good with their updates, and some who don't, then we have middle man bodies like carriers further muddying the waters.
    Good point
    02-13-2019 11:28 PM

Similar Threads

  1. It's possible to use micro sd as internal memory in android oreo go edition?
    By Android Central Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-11-2019, 11:57 PM
  2. Volume problem e5 supra
    By Android Central Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-11-2019, 11:50 PM
  3. How can I expand my video recording time on my Android LG Style
    By Android Central Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-11-2019, 10:07 PM
  4. Has anyone tried getting KaiOS on any android device?
    By Rootbrian in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-11-2019, 09:44 PM
  5. Why is mobile network standby taking 36% of my battery
    By Android Central Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-11-2019, 09:26 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD