01-10-2018 12:44 PM
28 12
tools
  1. HwyDemonTDi's Avatar
    New To Android, coming from Apple. (which went sour for me).

    Excited about this phone and cant wait to learn more about it and customize it. It so weird to the touch but Im sure Ill get used to it.

    Need to know if I need an Anti-Virus and if so , which ones are good ?
    iOS Gravity likes this.
    01-01-2017 02:44 PM
  2. TwitchyPuppy's Avatar
    You don't need one.

    There's AVG on the Play Store but it's more of a gimmick than anything, in my opinion.
    01-01-2017 02:47 PM
  3. HwyDemonTDi's Avatar
    Thank you
    01-01-2017 03:13 PM
  4. Preach2k's Avatar
    I use Lookout Premium for my antivirus. There has been some apps that slipped through on the Google store. If you download any 3rd party apps you will definitely need one. Since my phone is used for work it is mandatory for me.
    01-01-2017 04:02 PM
  5. Rumblee1's Avatar
    New To Android, coming from Apple. (which went sour for me).

    Excited about this phone and cant wait to learn more about it and customize it. It so weird to the touch but Im sure Ill get used to it.

    Need to know if I need an Anti-Virus and if so , which ones are good ?
    Ive got lookout premium.
    01-01-2017 04:12 PM
  6. Mr Mendelli's Avatar
    If you download third-party APKs or cracked APKs, I would reccomend doing so. Only because modding APKs and injecting malicious code is very easy and sites that host APKs outside of the play store (Especially cracked APKs) can often contain malicious code.
    01-01-2017 06:21 PM
  7. Mr Mendelli's Avatar
    I personally use Malwarebytes in combination with Avast! Mobile Security.
    01-01-2017 06:22 PM
  8. Morty2264's Avatar
    Welcome to Android Central and the world of Google! Great job with your phone choice!

    No, an anti-virus app is not necessary. Just use regular discretion with websites and never open up any "warning" pop-ups or links on webpages saying you have viruses and advising you to "download this to clean your phone." Those websites or pop-ups will actually install real viruses on your phone.

    So, in short, don't worry about anti-virus apps.
    01-01-2017 06:36 PM
  9. still1's Avatar
    New To Android, coming from Apple. (which went sour for me).

    Excited about this phone and cant wait to learn more about it and customize it. It so weird to the touch but Im sure Ill get used to it.

    Need to know if I need an Anti-Virus and if so , which ones are good ?
    you dont need one as long as you dont download apps from outside play store or cracked apps.
    dont illegally download paid apps. Those are the main source of virus.

    The main reason I think its useless to me
    1. Android already has built in virus scanner
    2. 3rd party scanners drain battery
    3. those scanners add so many ad-ons which many dont want
    huntm856, libra89, Matty and 3 others like this.
    01-01-2017 09:17 PM
  10. fragologist's Avatar
    I've been using Android since 2010. Never had a virus and I'm not using antivirus apps. Just download apps from the play store and not from some shady website.
    john_v likes this.
    01-02-2017 09:51 AM
  11. Richard Servello's Avatar
    No, not at all
    01-02-2017 10:06 AM
  12. Aquila's Avatar
    Most antivirus programs can be considered malware themselves. The few that are reputable are largely unnecessary.
    john_v and libra89 like this.
    01-02-2017 10:26 AM
  13. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    Not really.

    Google has already put a bunch of security measures on Android as part of the Play Services package. As long as you only install apps via trusted sources like Google Play, you don't need one.
    libra89, Morty2264 and huntm856 like this.
    01-02-2017 10:50 AM
  14. iOS Gravity's Avatar
    Just like everyone else said, don't download apps from random online sources and you'll be fine.
    libra89 likes this.
    01-02-2017 11:57 AM
  15. hal1's Avatar
    But there are other ways, other than software , for people to hack your phone, isn't there? I was thinking of using the phone option that Kaspersky Total Security has.

    Wasn't there some 60 Minutes special, or something, that showed somebody hacking into a reporter's phone within minutes?
    01-02-2017 12:44 PM
  16. tadpoles's Avatar
    No, you don't antivirus if you stick the Play Store and websites that are not what most would deem 'shady'.
    01-02-2017 01:12 PM
  17. tdizzel's Avatar
    Yes, if you hand your phone over to someone and they have the right tools they can hack it. Hacking an Android phone without direct access to it or without installing a malicious app is virtually impossible. And it's very difficult to install a malicious app from the play store.
    01-02-2017 01:35 PM
  18. tdizzel's Avatar
    I had an antivirus program on my first Android phone. That was a Motorola Droid back in 2009. I've learned since then that it's completely unnecessary since I only use the Play store(And the Amazon App store but only for Amazon Prime Video which is a well known, legit app)
    01-02-2017 01:37 PM
  19. hal1's Avatar
    Yes, if you hand your phone over to someone and they have the right tools they can hack it. Hacking an Android phone without direct access to it or without installing a malicious app is virtually impossible. And it's very difficult to install a malicious app from the play store.
    No, this was just sitting across the table from them I'll try to find the article story
    01-02-2017 03:49 PM
  20. hal1's Avatar
    No, this was just sitting across the table from them I'll try to find the article story
    Nevermind. I just read the article. The hacker either needed your phone number, or needed to touch up against your phone with the device. Probably different than what we're discussing here with software security
    01-02-2017 09:56 PM
  21. Lilybell2's Avatar
    I keep NFC off unless I actually need to use it. When finished, off it goes again. The same with Bluetooth... only on when needed.
    01-02-2017 10:15 PM
  22. Billy Bob Jimmy Joe's Avatar
    I keep NFC off unless I actually need to use it. When finished, off it goes again. The same with Bluetooth... only on when needed.
    I do that along with location.
    01-03-2017 01:22 AM
  23. Billy Bob Jimmy Joe's Avatar
    Using an antivirus on your phone is like wearing a life jacket while taking a bath.
    01-03-2017 01:24 AM
  24. Aquila's Avatar
    Using an antivirus on your phone is like wearing a life jacket while taking a bath.
    I'd say it's more like wearing a newspaper sailor hat while flying a plane. It's worthless, makes you look silly and has no impact whatsoever on the safe operation of the task at hand. Your analogy made it sound like overkill, where it was too much protection. In reality antivirus programs offer either no protection or worse, they themselves are the major compromise to your system.

    The major steps to security and privacy are as follows:

    1. Don't install apps from any unverified source, installing via the play store is always best. Also stay off of free stranger Wi-Fi unless Google's connectivity stuff is doing it via their VPN.

    2. Don't ever install anything from Cheetah Mobile or similar companies, these apps are malware/spyware.

    3. Don't buy phones that aren't guaranteed to receive monthly security updates.

    4. Don't buy phones that aren't running the latest version of Android

    5. Don't root

    6. Don't use a microSD card. Not using it at all is best, but if you must, use adoptable storage with encryption.

    7. Read the terms and privacy policies of the apps you are going to use and understand how they're using the data they ask to access.

    8. Don't leave your device physically accessible to thieves and criminals.

    9. Don't install any apps that you believe will give you paid content for free.

    10. Uninstall all apps that serve ads without a way to turn them off in settings or via a purchase.

    11. Uninstall apps you don't actually use.

    12. Don't install apps from devs until you know exactly what you're getting and what they are getting out of it.

    In short, keep your guard up. The basic security in a fully updated Android OS and the play store will do 99% of the work and the last 1% is just vigilance. But a user can undo almost all of Androids built in protection simply by circumventing them, such as rooting, installing apps from shady sources or shady devs on legit sources, etc. Vigilance.
    01-03-2017 08:28 AM
  25. still1's Avatar
    Yes, if you hand your phone over to someone and they have the right tools they can hack it. Hacking an Android phone without direct access to it or without installing a malicious app is virtually impossible. And it's very difficult to install a malicious app from the play store.
    I would say its still hard to hack your phone if you handover the device to someone(with 7.1.1 and dec or jan security update and a lock screen)

    they could try and unlock bootloader but then all data will be wiped and they would still not get to your data.
    on top of that to unlock or authorize a device you need to go to developer settings to enable some options.

    I am not saying its not possible but its hard for a normal person to do it
    01-03-2017 10:19 AM
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