1. DMP89145's Avatar
    I was reading an article on our sister site, Windows Central, about Microsoft's plan around 'Windows Lite' and competing directly with Chrome OS and Chromebooks. It's an interesting idea from MS. An OS centered around the web and browser based services. From that article:

    "Not everyone needs a platform with decades of legacy support. They need to write an essay in a word processing app, listen to music through their favorite music-streaming service, and chat with friends on any number of social networks. This is the use case for a large percentage of PC users. Windows 10 is overkill for this. Chrome OS is slowly gaining market share, as audiences come to realize that a lightweight platform is all they need."

    https://www.windowscentral.com/who-w...-lite-going-be

    I prefer lighter internet based computing experience, for sure, but I'm not sure if that type of computing could scale up globally. I think it works well in the western part of the world, but globally there will be roadblocks. Reliable internet and reasonable data plans are still an issue in many parts of the world, including rural parts of the west. I think most people could function with a Chrome device, but then my thoughts get halted by the the internet/data issue.

    TL;DR: You need to be on the web for Chrome OS to be at it's best. So will Pixel/Chromebooks always be considered secondary devices because of that specific limitation?
    kct1975 likes this.
    02-17-2019 05:05 PM
  2. B. Diddy's Avatar
    The argument I would make is: Who really uses their laptop these days without a web connection on a consistent basis? People seek out cafes and other locations specifically because they have good internet. There are clearly reasons to use a PC or Macbook if you're a big gamer or need to use some heavy-duty standalone program that is not connected to the web, but I've thought for a long time that the vast majority of average users can do everything they want to do on a Chromebook.
    02-17-2019 08:38 PM
  3. li2327's Avatar
    I do everything on my chromebook. You can do certain tasks offline. When that's not good enough I just turn my phone into a quick hotspot. I also have a Windows laptop, but my chromebook is my go to device.
    02-17-2019 08:40 PM
  4. DMP89145's Avatar
    The argument I would make is: Who really uses their laptop these days without a web connection on a consistent basis? People seek out cafes and other locations specifically because they have good internet. There are clearly reasons to use a PC or Macbook if you're a big gamer or need to use some heavy-duty standalone program that is not connected to the web, but I've thought for a long time that the vast majority of average users can do everything they want to do on a Chromebook.
    I think this definitely applies to most households in the west. When I was reading Zac's piece on WC, although he was making the case for MS and Windows Lite, a Chrome OS device really seemed to be a better case for average/light computing than a (software heavier) laptop like a PC or a MAC.

    Web based services like Docs and even MS Office suite seemed to be a great solution. Especially when you consider some of the offline capabilities.
    Laura Knotek, B. Diddy and kct1975 like this.
    02-17-2019 10:24 PM
  5. DMP89145's Avatar
    I do everything on my chromebook. You can do certain tasks offline. When that's not good enough I just turn my phone into a quick hotspot. I also have a Windows laptop, but my chromebook is my go to device.
    I got the same set up AND the same result. My Chrome device is my daily and my Windows laptop is left wondering if I'm still around.

    For the first time this year, I was travelling for business and packed the Chrome and left the Dell at the house. The experience definitely met all my expectations.
    kct1975, Laura Knotek and B. Diddy like this.
    02-17-2019 10:29 PM
  6. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    I have a notebook running Windows 10, but I never use it offline.

    I use my Android phone and tablet more than my notebook running Windows 10 at this time.
    DMP89145 and li2327 like this.
    02-18-2019 12:58 AM
  7. DMP89145's Avatar
    I have a notebook running Windows 10, but I never use it offline.

    I use my Android phone and tablet more than my notebook running Windows 10 at this time.
    See, I'm wondering if there's a shift happening in the average user workflow and more people are recognizing that on device software isn't as necessary as it used to be even just a few years ago. Mainly because so many people already do so much through their mobile platforms. If that's true, and MS is recognizing that, I believe that Google is ahead with that type of computing.
    kct1975 and Laura Knotek like this.
    02-18-2019 10:24 AM
  8. Nauga's Avatar
    See, I'm wondering if there's a shift happening in the average user workflow and more people are recognizing that on device software isn't as necessary as it used to be even just a few years ago.
    Could be, but for me that shift in workflow is dictated more by vendor decisions to shift to a subscription model for selling their software than it is by users demanding that software "change with the times" to accommodate them. I still hate that Google Docs and MS Word 360 suck compared to a locally installed version of Word if you need to section and paginate a "long" document. That's one reason I was happy to get LibreOffice on my Pixelbook (although it's still a little rough around the edges using it via Crostini).
    B. Diddy and DMP89145 like this.
    02-18-2019 11:58 AM
  9. DMP89145's Avatar
    Could be, but for me that shift in workflow is dictated more by vendor decisions to shift to a subscription model for selling their software than it is by users demanding that software "change with the times" to accommodate them. I still hate that Google Docs and MS Word 360 suck compared to a locally installed version of Word if you need to section and paginate a "long" document. That's one reason I was happy to get LibreOffice on my Pixelbook (although it's still a little rough around the edges using it via Crostini).
    I hear you on this, for sure, and I think the "software as a service" model that MS has implemented in recent years reflects things being more about a business decision and less about current user desires, though I do feel both elements come in to play there.

    That Office 365 subscription model that they have now that includes the on device software, which is the most powerful, and coupling that with the online versions is a great package, I think at least, for users that just absolutely need that level of computing power. As it's been said before, "it's better to have it and not need it, than need it and not have it."

    I'd like to see the Google online offerings continue to move up in strength. I guess that would depend on how much server power Google wants to dedicate to that. Then there are also the concerns with latency, etc. Maybe we'll see things get more powerful as "edge computing" develops further. Just need to take some pressure off of those servers some, I think.
    Laura Knotek and B. Diddy like this.
    02-18-2019 12:42 PM
  10. WillysJeepMan's Avatar
    I read that article too. My conclusion: Windows 10 Lite, like Windows RT and Windows 10S will be DOA. Why? Because Microsoft will not do what is required to make a truly lightweight and nimble version of Windows. At the very least, they need to gut out the Enterprise-level subsystems that aren't needed for general consumers. They won't do that because of the effort and time involved in regression testing to determine what will work and what won't is far greater than they are willing to do.

    I think the notion of, "You need to be on the web for Chrome OS to be at it's best." is becoming less true with each release of Chrome OS. There is a growing number of Chrome OS apps that work offline. Android apps don't need to be always-online. The inclusion of support for Linux apps is greatly expanding the capabilities for being offline.

    At this point in time, Linux app support is not practical because of the limitations of the sandboxing of the file system. At the very least Google needs to allow Linux apps access to the "Downloads" folder. I have a full directory tree under Downloads so that I can easily access all locally stored data from both Chrome OS and Android. The moment that the Linux container can access "Downloads", I'll be off and running installing Linux apps.

    Chrome OS is shaping up to be an OS environment that can effectively span tablets to desktops and everything in between.
    B. Diddy, Johnny6000 and DMP89145 like this.
    02-19-2019 12:14 PM
  11. maj71303's Avatar
    Well I looked at the pixelbook, Slate, and chromebooks and felt they were mostly lackluster. I picked up a Samsung GalaxyBook 2 which is Windows 10 and it is surprisingly great to use. It came with Keyboard, Verizon LTE and Pen which sealed the deal than having to buy those separately. In my view Chrome has stalled a bit as it has it's limits just like all the other ecosystems and a lot of businesses just aren't seeing the need to invest in Google vision. Especially ones that run custome programs and apps. As far as regular consumers I haven't hardly seen anyone with Chromebooks, or pixelbooks. IMO I don't think they are making as big as a dent as they hoped either. Even education institutions are pulling back on the chromebook and ipad train.
    02-19-2019 02:13 PM
  12. B. Diddy's Avatar
    I'm sure there will be loads of people on this forum who'll disagree with you, but you gotta use what works for you. I'm glad that Galaxy Book2 is perfect for you.

    As for popularity and sales, I thought this was interesting: https://www.amazon.com/gp/bestseller...cUvbUpU6472428. The top 2 best sellers are still currently Chromebooks.
    02-21-2019 11:04 PM
  13. li2327's Avatar
    I'm finding that a basic user can do all they need on a chromebook. They have really come a long way.
    03-02-2019 08:48 AM
  14. DMP89145's Avatar
    Interesting read from Slash Gear. I'll leave the link below but makes a great case for ChromeOS

    "Short of Fuschia really becoming a thing, Chrome OS is, for all intents and purposes, the Google OS people have been speculating about years ago. From a limited, web-centric, and almost negligible platform designed for schools, Chrome OS has fully blossomed to become a serious threat to the duopoly of Windows and Mac on desktops."

    https://www.slashgear.com/chrome-os-...hing-05568471/
    03-05-2019 11:51 PM
  15. ptkelly's Avatar
    I live in Oaxaca, Mexico, which is not the technological center of the hemisphere. I have a desktop computer which is, of course, Windows 10. I decided to get a Chromebook just to play with. I've been using a Chromebook for 18 months now and I'm giving my desktop to a family here. The Chromebook meets my needs. For months, I ran with Android apps but for some the web-based program is better.

    After some thought I realized that between my home and dozens of cafes, restaurants, libraries, and parks with free WiFi, I don't really need many Android apps. Now, what can be on the web is.

    When I got my first Chrome device, a Samsung, Android apps were just a promise. They came a few months later. That made a big difference. I hated the very non-standard keyboard and gave the device to a student who types with two fingers. I got an Asus and couldn't be happier. I recently added Google Assistant to my Asus and it's a hoot. Just this morning a neighbor came by while I was on the computer. She borrowed a step-ladder and mentioned that she needed a supplement called Lutein and didn't know where to get it. I opened Google Assistant and it not only knew what the stuff was but gave us two places in Oaxaca that normally have it. Amazing.
    03-07-2019 10:13 AM

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