1. sniperservice's Avatar
    I ask because I am going to pre order a Daydream, if so
    10-05-2016 11:17 AM
  2. krisguy's Avatar
    I don't belive so. LG has their own VR headset that with it, but LG has not said anything about Daydream, just Nougat.
    sniperservice likes this.
    10-05-2016 12:00 PM
  3. SupraLB's Avatar
    I don't think LCD screens work with VR headsets, so I dont think so.

    Google's "VR Ready" smartphone certification

    Short photon-to-motion latency VR requires hardware and software working together, so Google will be passing down requirements to OEMs that ensure their devices will work with Android's new VR mode. This will be a whole new section of the Android Compatibility Definition Document with requirements and tests to ensure an OEM's phone will be up to Google's VR requirements.

    For now, only the Nexus 6P makes the "VR Ready" cut. The Nexus 5X isn't eligible for one very important reason: it has an LCD screen. AMOLED displays are mandatory.

    An LCD works by using a spiral of liquid crystals to control light flow in between a pair of polarizers. Applying electricity to the LCD spiral causes them to straighten out, which, when combined with the polarizer layers, works to turn light off (twisted crystals block the light) or on (straight crystals align with the polarizer and allow light through). Having these crystals twist and untwist takes time, which is called the "response time" and is usually measured in milliseconds. AMOLEDs are literally just a bunch of tiny LEDs—active matrix organic light-emitting diodes, recall—so flipping them on and off is a much quicker matter of simply applying and removing current.

    Google's VR program mandates AMOLEDs due to their much faster pixel response time. This cuts down on motion blur, which is critical when you're whipping your head around in VR. When it came time to pick displays for the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, those companies went with AMOLED, too—LCDs just aren't cut out for VR. However, unlike current consumer VR head-mounted displays, Android displays still only run at 60Hz. This is significantly slower than the 90Hz refresh rates of the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive.
    10-05-2016 12:16 PM
  4. sniperservice's Avatar
    I don't think LCD screens work with VR headsets, so I dont think so.

    Google's "VR Ready" smartphone certification

    Short photon-to-motion latency VR requires hardware and software working together, so Google will be passing down requirements to OEMs that ensure their devices will work with Android's new VR mode. This will be a whole new section of the Android Compatibility Definition Document with requirements and tests to ensure an OEM's phone will be up to Google's VR requirements.

    For now, only the Nexus 6P makes the "VR Ready" cut. The Nexus 5X isn't eligible for one very important reason: it has an LCD screen. AMOLED displays are mandatory.

    An LCD works by using a spiral of liquid crystals to control light flow in between a pair of polarizers. Applying electricity to the LCD spiral causes them to straighten out, which, when combined with the polarizer layers, works to turn light off (twisted crystals block the light) or on (straight crystals align with the polarizer and allow light through). Having these crystals twist and untwist takes time, which is called the "response time" and is usually measured in milliseconds. AMOLEDs are literally just a bunch of tiny LEDs—active matrix organic light-emitting diodes, recall—so flipping them on and off is a much quicker matter of simply applying and removing current.

    Google's VR program mandates AMOLEDs due to their much faster pixel response time. This cuts down on motion blur, which is critical when you're whipping your head around in VR. When it came time to pick displays for the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, those companies went with AMOLED, too—LCDs just aren't cut out for VR. However, unlike current consumer VR head-mounted displays, Android displays still only run at 60Hz. This is significantly slower than the 90Hz refresh rates of the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive.
    Thanks for this detailed response. VR isn't a must have, but a nice bonus
    TheMarcus likes this.
    10-05-2016 12:19 PM
  5. VoltaicShock's Avatar
    I don't think LCD screens work with VR headsets, so I dont think so.

    Google's "VR Ready" smartphone certification

    Short photon-to-motion latency VR requires hardware and software working together, so Google will be passing down requirements to OEMs that ensure their devices will work with Android's new VR mode. This will be a whole new section of the Android Compatibility Definition Document with requirements and tests to ensure an OEM's phone will be up to Google's VR requirements.

    For now, only the Nexus 6P makes the "VR Ready" cut. The Nexus 5X isn't eligible for one very important reason: it has an LCD screen. AMOLED displays are mandatory.

    An LCD works by using a spiral of liquid crystals to control light flow in between a pair of polarizers. Applying electricity to the LCD spiral causes them to straighten out, which, when combined with the polarizer layers, works to turn light off (twisted crystals block the light) or on (straight crystals align with the polarizer and allow light through). Having these crystals twist and untwist takes time, which is called the "response time" and is usually measured in milliseconds. AMOLEDs are literally just a bunch of tiny LEDs—active matrix organic light-emitting diodes, recall—so flipping them on and off is a much quicker matter of simply applying and removing current.

    Google's VR program mandates AMOLEDs due to their much faster pixel response time. This cuts down on motion blur, which is critical when you're whipping your head around in VR. When it came time to pick displays for the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, those companies went with AMOLED, too—LCDs just aren't cut out for VR. However, unlike current consumer VR head-mounted displays, Android displays still only run at 60Hz. This is significantly slower than the 90Hz refresh rates of the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive.
    I think it will still work it just won't be certified by Google. You also might get some ghosting issues when doing VR.
    10-06-2016 10:59 PM
  6. Kevin OQuinn's Avatar
    I don't think LCD screens work with VR headsets, so I dont think so.

    Google's "VR Ready" smartphone certification

    Short photon-to-motion latency VR requires hardware and software working together, so Google will be passing down requirements to OEMs that ensure their devices will work with Android's new VR mode. This will be a whole new section of the Android Compatibility Definition Document with requirements and tests to ensure an OEM's phone will be up to Google's VR requirements.

    For now, only the Nexus 6P makes the "VR Ready" cut. The Nexus 5X isn't eligible for one very important reason: it has an LCD screen. AMOLED displays are mandatory.

    An LCD works by using a spiral of liquid crystals to control light flow in between a pair of polarizers. Applying electricity to the LCD spiral causes them to straighten out, which, when combined with the polarizer layers, works to turn light off (twisted crystals block the light) or on (straight crystals align with the polarizer and allow light through). Having these crystals twist and untwist takes time, which is called the "response time" and is usually measured in milliseconds. AMOLEDs are literally just a bunch of tiny LEDs—active matrix organic light-emitting diodes, recall—so flipping them on and off is a much quicker matter of simply applying and removing current.

    Google's VR program mandates AMOLEDs due to their much faster pixel response time. This cuts down on motion blur, which is critical when you're whipping your head around in VR. When it came time to pick displays for the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive, those companies went with AMOLED, too—LCDs just aren't cut out for VR. However, unlike current consumer VR head-mounted displays, Android displays still only run at 60Hz. This is significantly slower than the 90Hz refresh rates of the Oculus Rift and HTC Vive.
    Can you post the link to the article this is from please? I'd like to read more.

    LCD displays regularly go up to 144hz for gaming monitors for PC's, so the refresh rate issue is not why LCD's weren't used. At least not exclusively and/or there is more to it than they're letting on.

    Also, I doubt the 5x has the horsepower to run VR well enough to provide a good experience.
    10-08-2016 12:53 PM
  7. JaboSan's Avatar
    I would love if the V20 would be daydream compliant. I wish we could move forward with one mobile VR standard.
    10-10-2016 08:04 AM
  8. PalakMi's Avatar
    Since axon 7 is daydream compatible (not ready), I think LG V20 will be Daydream capable
    10-10-2016 08:40 AM
  9. donebrasko's Avatar
    I don't belive so. LG has their own VR headset that with it, but LG has not said anything about Daydream, just Nougat.
    Will lgs work with v20?
    10-10-2016 09:56 PM
  10. fraamus's Avatar
    ZTE claims the Axon 7 phones are VR ready but aren't certified because I think Google wants to reserve that for their Pixel release. Their specs are on par with the Pixel with 2K AMOLED plenty of RAM and and 820 processor. I just returned mine after a couple week trial and except for Nougat it seems pretty good to go. My understanding is Nougat won't be out until December except for LG and Google. I didn't feel like waiting beyond my trial to see.
    10-12-2016 01:47 AM
  11. Da808Dragon's Avatar
    This is all pretty exciting. I could really use a straight forward VR solution if I end up in the desert soon. Will have to make a careful decision.
    10-18-2016 02:01 PM
  12. anon(9780053)'s Avatar
    no daydream like my older note 7s that are gone. i chked the v20s settings.
    10-18-2016 11:11 PM

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