1. xTlex's Avatar
    Hi, I got my P40 Pro for a couple of months now and I love it so far. I was wondering how secure my data is and whether you can trust Huawei (or any big tech company) with it anymore. I haven't seen any indication of them following me around the web like Facebook/Google does, I guess Huawei is more of hardware company afterall, rather than relying on ad revenue. What's your input? Cheers
    08-17-2020 10:29 AM
  2. joeldf's Avatar
    Whether real or imagined, I think the fear is that you won't know what info is sent.

    And that's the point.

    Supposedly, information is tracked, sent to a database and stored there for whatever metadata can be gleened for some nefarious use at a later time.

    We know what Google/Facebook/Apple (yes, even Apple - don't think they don't keep gobbs of data on users as well, they just don't sell it the same way) does with the data they get from us, so the trick is to not give them much in the first place. For example, with Google, have a Google account if you wish, but don't use Gmail (you don't need a Gmail account to have a Google account - any email will do - even an outlook.com email). For Facebook, use only basic information anyone would know just looking at you, and maybe the schools you went to if you want. But don't fill in those favorites lists (tv shows, movies, music...), political and religious affiliations, and all that stuff; because that's where the social engineering attacks and ads come from.

    My feeling is that this fear of Chinese companies has some foundation in the fact that these companies do have ties to the government. They all have to to stay in business within their boundaries.

    Whether or not you want to believe that Beijing actually has these tech companies install extra chips in these devices that intercept all your data and send it to a server in China for storage and later analysis, is up to you.

    Except for some anecdotal talk several years ago of such "mystery" chips on some server equipment from Huawai, and a few security experts finding some Chinese apps on some Chinese phones sending user data in the background to known Chinese IP addresses (a TCL weather app in one case), not much else has ever been really verified.
    xTlex likes this.
    08-17-2020 11:26 AM
  3. xTlex's Avatar
    Whether real or imagined, I think the fear is that you won't know what info is sent.

    And that's the point.

    Supposedly, information is tracked, sent to a database and stored there for whatever metadata can be gleened for some nefarious use at a later time.

    We know what Google/Facebook/Apple (yes, even Apple - don't think they don't keep gobbs of data on users as well, they just don't sell it the same way) does with the data they get from us, so the trick is to not give them much in the first place. For example, with Google, have a Google account if you wish, but don't use Gmail (you don't need a Gmail account to have a Google account - any email will do - even an outlook.com email). For Facebook, use only basic information anyone would know just looking at you, and maybe the schools you went to if you want. But don't fill in those favorites lists (tv shows, movies, music...), political and religious affiliations, and all that stuff; because that's where the social engineering attacks and ads come from.

    My feeling is that this fear of Chinese companies has some foundation in the fact that these companies do have ties to the government. They all have to to stay in business within their boundaries.

    Whether or not you want to believe that Beijing actually has these tech companies install extra chips in these devices that intercept all your data and send it to a server in China for storage and later analysis, is up to you.

    Except for some anecdotal talk several years ago of such "mystery" chips on some server equipment from Huawai, and a few security experts finding some Chinese apps on some Chinese phones sending user data in the background to known Chinese IP addresses (a TCL weather app in one case), not much else has ever been really verified.
    Those are such great points, if you don't HAVE to give your data, why do it voluntarily. It always boggled my mind when people put every single detail about themselves there, on PUBLIC too. Like they're inviting robbers/weirdos.

    As far as having the Chinese government being involved, like you said I haven't seen any proof. I do know that technically they could ask for access from these companies, but that goes for all governments in the world, its up to the company to decide whether to comply or not. I know Apple didn't, but Facebook and and Google definitely gave the American Government some access.
    08-17-2020 12:12 PM
  4. sjtechhart's Avatar
    This got me thinking and after a wee bit of digging i found an interesting fact. So Huawei store all their cloud data for non-chinese customers in Dublin which is in the EU. This means it has to be fully compliant with the EU GDPR laws which are very strict and have consumer protection front and centre. Since brexit though, Google have placed users data in the UK under the same rules as the US which in theory gives UK users of google much less protection for their personal data being sold to 3rd parties or being used in ways which under EU GDPR wouldn't be legal. So my take away is that the 1st opportunity it had to remove consumer protection because of brexit google jumped at the chance.
    08-18-2020 06:21 AM
  5. xTlex's Avatar
    This got me thinking and after a wee bit of digging i found an interesting fact. So Huawei store all their cloud data for non-chinese customers in Dublin which is in the EU. This means it has to be fully compliant with the EU GDPR laws which are very strict and have consumer protection front and centre. Since brexit though, Google have placed users data in the UK under the same rules as the US which in theory gives UK users of google much less protection for their personal data being sold to 3rd parties or being used in ways which under EU GDPR wouldn't be legal. So my take away is that the 1st opportunity it had to remove consumer protection because of brexit google jumped at the chance.
    Hah, doesn't surprise me in the least. I was about to feel better, but then I read one. Now the UK is trully the US of Europe, I expected big tech to try and take advantage of relaxed regulation. Environmental regulation is next on the list,
    08-18-2020 10:28 AM
  6. Kizzy Catwoman's Avatar
    This got me thinking and after a wee bit of digging i found an interesting fact. So Huawei store all their cloud data for non-chinese customers in Dublin which is in the EU. This means it has to be fully compliant with the EU GDPR laws which are very strict and have consumer protection front and centre. Since brexit though, Google have placed users data in the UK under the same rules as the US which in theory gives UK users of google much less protection for their personal data being sold to 3rd parties or being used in ways which under EU GDPR wouldn't be legal. So my take away is that the 1st opportunity it had to remove consumer protection because of brexit google jumped at the chance.
    Except that Google assured us that our data is still protected by GDRP as we are still going to be under it even after Brexit. We have entered all current EU legislation into UK law. But they said logistically it is better to have the UK under US terms. They still can't sell our data to third parties.
    08-18-2020 11:45 AM
  7. OnkenEater313's Avatar
    I dont believe for a second that Huawei install chips that log our data and fire it to places we dont know about!
    The devices and equipment are checked over by all sorts of worldwide 3rd parties including all mobile networks so that would have come out public by now.
    08-18-2020 12:04 PM
  8. hiyamom's Avatar
    Interesting post this, I never even considered what happens to my data. To be honest it's never been a concern, I'm not exactly sharing generation's old family secrets
    08-19-2020 03:49 AM
  9. xTlex's Avatar
    Except that Google assured us that our data is still protected by GDRP as we are still going to be under it even after Brexit. We have entered all current EU legislation into UK law. But they said logistically it is better to have the UK under US terms. They still can't sell our data to third parties.
    Yeah, it's not like big tech has ever been caught lying or anything. I truly believe they won't, but we can only know about it when it's too late.
    08-19-2020 09:27 AM
  10. xTlex's Avatar
    Interesting post this, I never even considered what happens to my data. To be honest it's never been a concern, I'm not exactly sharing generation's old family secrets
    Well, even though not all of your data is important, you're basically a gold mine for them to dig into, there's some soil/rock to dig through first, before you get the golden shiny metal. Just like the good ol' saying says "If it's free, you are the product." So yeah, everyone has data that is important to companies that try to sell you stuff, like shopping behaviour, health conditions etc.
    08-19-2020 09:31 AM
  11. sjtechhart's Avatar
    But Google still took UK data under US terms and made us agree to new terms and conditions or forfeit using google services as quickly as they could. Huawei, are still however completely governed by EU law including GDPR. No grey areas etc. Not to get too political on a forum about phones but the UK government have reportedly already been selling off NHS medial records to US drug companies. The point I'm making is that Huawei online security is still governed by EU law with none of the gray areas or ifs and buts of Brexit or inferior US law. You know exactly where you stand. Protected by very strict and consumer protection based EU GDPR laws.
    08-19-2020 10:06 AM
  12. SamRH1's Avatar
    I'd probably agree with this. I think that all companies generalise data to sell more products. It would be naiive to think otherwise.

    But also I believe there is nothing to worry about and nothing at all sinister is being done by my of the big companies.
    08-19-2020 10:20 AM
  13. sjtechhart's Avatar
    Haha i dunno about that SamRH1 but if there is there isn't much any of us can do about it. I just find it amusing that the "big bad Chinese company" Huawei are the ones under strict EU Regs while the Americans have very quickly put themselves in a grey area that in no way benefits it's users in the UK.
    08-20-2020 04:43 AM
  14. xTlex's Avatar
    But Google still took UK data under US terms and made us agree to new terms and conditions or forfeit using google services as quickly as they could. Huawei, are still however completely governed by EU law including GDPR. No grey areas etc. Not to get too political on a forum about phones but the UK government have reportedly already been selling off NHS medial records to US drug companies. The point I'm making is that Huawei online security is still governed by EU law with none of the gray areas or ifs and buts of Brexit or inferior US law. You know exactly where you stand. Protected by very strict and consumer protection based EU GDPR laws.
    If that's the case, then that's actually legit making me feel better. It's funny how things work out in "Politics", but I guess all these messes have been a product of politics.
    08-20-2020 04:57 AM
  15. xTlex's Avatar
    I'd probably agree with this. I think that all companies generalise data to sell more products. It would be naiive to think otherwise.

    But also I believe there is nothing to worry about and nothing at all sinister is being done by my of the big companies.
    Ye, I know people who "don't care because they're not doing any that wrong", but that's not what the right to privacy is about. If you are ok with it, go ahead, but at least to have the choice to opt out is what it's all about. The majority of us have nothing to hide, doesn't mean big tech should be able to do w/e they want with our data.
    08-20-2020 05:00 AM
  16. xTlex's Avatar
    Haha i dunno about that SamRH1 but if there is there isn't much any of us can do about it. I just find it amusing that the "big bad Chinese company" Huawei are the ones under strict EU Regs while the Americans have very quickly put themselves in a grey area that in no way benefits it's users in the UK.
    Haha, so true, I guess as long as Huawei is based in the EU, we should be safe.
    08-20-2020 05:00 AM
  17. ptkelly's Avatar
    Should I trust....

    NSA
    FBI
    DNC
    DHS
    IRS
    ATF
    ICE
    01-12-2021 01:00 PM

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