1. markabele's Avatar
    As we all know, going to 0 on any lithium battery is bad. So, the question is...How long will these battery mods stay viable with constantly going to 0. They really need to do a software update where you can go off of phone power once it gets down to 10 or 15%. The easy answer is to just remove the mod when it gets low, but I don't really like not having a back on my phone. I'm paranoid about something happening to all those communications (or getting dirty). And it's not convenient to carry around a style shell to change it out with. Or do most of you say, screw it, and let it go to 0 routinely?
    12-11-2016 11:37 AM
  2. Rukbat's Avatar
    Absolutely not - fully discharging a lithium battery can make it completely unchargeable (unless you have an external charger).

    If the battery is in the phone and you have external power connected, the charge should go up, not down. If it's going down with external power connected, either the charger can't supply enough current (some of the old chargers supplied only about 700mA) or the phone is drawing too much, due to some problem in the phone.

    Not only shouldn't you let it go to 0 occasionally, you should never let it go below 40%. Don't believe me? See the differences in lifespan for different charging at Battery University - How to Prolong Lithium-based Batteries. (Cadex, the owner of the site, makes equipment that manipulates batteries - charging, discharging, etc., so they know a little bit about batteries.)
    12-11-2016 12:42 PM
  3. markabele's Avatar
    I understand about lithium batteries, hence the post. However, I'm not sure you answered the question or fully understand what is going on. Do you own one of the Moto Z's? I don't want to be disrespectful, but this is probably best answered by someone who has used the battery moto mods.
    12-11-2016 01:31 PM
  4. guapinoy's Avatar
    I understand about lithium batteries, hence the post. However, I'm not sure you answered the question or fully understand what is going on. Do you own one of the Moto Z's? I don't want to be disrespectful, but this is probably best answered by someone who has used the battery moto mods.
    I have the same concerns. They should really let the users pick when the Moto Mod battery should kick in maybe 50℅. I'm glad that I got my battery mod for free because with the current implementation I don't think it'll last as long.
    12-11-2016 03:45 PM
  5. andrew_ackley's Avatar
    I have the same concerns. They should really let the users pick when the Moto Mod battery should kick in maybe 50℅. I'm glad that I got my battery mod for free because with the current implementation I don't think it'll last as long.
    I wish the battery mods had more than two option. I guess on the speaker mod it drains the speaker first? 0% on the battery can't be good I agree. Having multiple mods is a pain to keep them charged bc I don't normally charge over night.
    12-12-2016 07:59 AM
  6. hotshotazn's Avatar
    Showing 0% on your phone (or mod) doesn't necessarily mean your battery is at 0 capacity. Smart designed OS's will tell you have 0% left in order to preserve the life of your battery (from sitting at 0%). I remember letting my old Nokia 3390 die and testing the battery at work. Surprised that it was showing it still had power. That was on a dumb phone.

    I'd venture to guess your battery still has 5 - 10% left. Of course, I can't test the battery mod since it uses the Pogo plugs to provide power to the Z.
    12-12-2016 01:49 PM
  7. canonBoy's Avatar
    Not only shouldn't you let it go to 0 occasionally, you should never let it go below 40%. Don't believe me? See the differences in lifespan for different charging at Battery University - How to Prolong Lithium-based Batteries. (Cadex, the owner of the site, makes equipment that manipulates batteries - charging, discharging, etc., so they know a little bit about batteries.)
    That article recommends nothing about keeping a charge above 40%. The comments run rampant about 40%, only because someone posted:

    'On November 13, 2010 at 3:41pm
    James wrote:
    Also, is there an ideal range to charge/discharge the battery in e.g. 40%-70%, ensuring a partial discharge?'

    Then like wildfire everyone is talking about 40% being some magical number.

    Batteries are batteries, the heat it gets exposed to in your car during the summer, or when cell signal is weak are going to do way more harm to it than baby-ing it to only hold a charge between 40-45% all the time.

    Use your phone how you want to use it... then in a couple years when the OS doesn't get more updates and security patches, get a new phone, with a new battery. No one gets an award or a gift card to best buy by achieving X amount of battery capacity by some random timeline. If being the king of forum comments bragging how your OG Motorola Droid is still your daily driver and you battery life is superb, then more power to you I guess.
    markabele likes this.
    12-13-2016 10:12 AM
  8. YAYTech's Avatar
    That article recommends nothing about keeping a charge above 40%. The comments run rampant about 40%, only because someone posted:

    'On November 13, 2010 at 3:41pm
    James wrote:
    Also, is there an ideal range to charge/discharge the battery in e.g. 40%-70%, ensuring a partial discharge?'

    Then like wildfire everyone is talking about 40% being some magical number.

    Batteries are batteries, the heat it gets exposed to in your car during the summer, or when cell signal is weak are going to do way more harm to it than baby-ing it to only hold a charge between 40-45% all the time.

    Use your phone how you want to use it... then in a couple years when the OS doesn't get more updates and security patches, get a new phone, with a new battery. No one gets an award or a gift card to best buy by achieving X amount of battery capacity by some random timeline. If being the king of forum comments bragging how your OG Motorola Droid is still your daily driver and you battery life is superb, then more power to you I guess.
    I agree, and on top of this, we're talking about trying to preserve the battery life of an external, replaceable battery at the expense of charge cycles on the internal, non-replaceable battery. IMO, trust the engineers have made sure you won't ruin the battery quickly, but go ahead & put as much abuse as possible on the external one. In a year a replacement battery mod will probably be on clearance and you can swap it out cheaply if it's really formed a reduced capacity.
    12-13-2016 10:45 AM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD