08-23-2013 10:39 AM
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  1. NoYankees44's Avatar
    I'd still curious to know, outside of games (and even then...), what apps people are running that peg two cores at 100% with more than two active threads?
    The question is not really how many now, but how soon will there be a prevalent need. Heavy multithreading is coming in mobile code, don't let anyone tell you different, but how soon will it make a difference in the average apps? Very recently desktop programs have really started heavily optimising for high thread counts. I don't thing mobile processing will take long to follow for efficiency reasons alone, but I am not a dev and don't know. I would ignorantly say that the moto x will be fine for its foreseeable life, but who knows. I definitely think that it will be one of the last to get away with dual core without better architecture or optimization.

    A good example of the rise of multithreading is in the amd 8 core processor. It has been out a while, but is now performing much better in newer games and programs than it has ever before with its heavily multithreading friendly architecture.

    Sent from my SCH-I535
    07-23-2013 09:30 AM
  2. Rule9's Avatar
    The question is not really how many now, but how soon will there be a prevalent need. Heavy multithreading is coming in mobile code, don't let anyone tell you different, but how soon will it make a difference in the average apps? Very recently desktop programs have really started heavily optimising for high thread counts. I don't thing mobile processing will take long to follow for efficiency reasons alone, but I am not a dev and don't know. I would ignorantly say that the moto x will be fine for its foreseeable life, but who knows. I definitely think that it will be one of the last to get away with dual core without better architecture or optimization.

    A good example of the rise of multithreading is in the amd 8 core processor. It has been out a while, but is now performing much better in newer games and programs than it has ever before with its heavily multithreading friendly architecture.

    Sent from my SCH-I535
    There's a big race on right now between Intel and Qualcomm to capture the mobile market, but I agree with you, it isn't likely to come to full fruition in mass production on smartphones until after 2014 at the earliest. Then you'll be waiting for the mobile apps to be coded appropriately. Which means a 1.7 dual core will be fine for the time-frame it's intended for.
    07-23-2013 10:03 AM
  3. Demur's Avatar
    I'm really curious to see if this thing includes full USB OTG (e.g. powered) and MHL. I was close to recommending the Nexus 4 to someone, but the galling lack of USB On-The-Go (especially in light of its limited internal storage and lack of card slot) was a dealbreaker for me. F' that.

    Also curious to see how much of the context aware features you can disable. When hardware / software companies try to outsmart their users and take control away, it's usually (always?) a disaster. My feelings about it are similar to those voiced here in user aicom's comment.

    I'm also wondering, if the phone is supposed to be always on and responding to voice commands, what will happen if person A has the phone and person B issues a voice command, e.g. to dial someone, either because they also have the phone, or intentionally to command person A's phone.
    07-23-2013 10:13 AM
  4. mech1164's Avatar
    I'm also wondering, if the phone is supposed to be always on and responding to voice commands, what will happen if person A has the phone and person B issues a voice command, e.g. to dial someone, either because they also have the phone, or intentionally to command person A's phone.
    Well that depends on a few things.

    1: How far away are they. If say they are at the same table and B barks out a command to his phone A's phone might respond to.

    2: The command may be understood but not completed. As in your example, B issues a call someone to his phone. A's phone picks that up and tries to do the same thing. Only the person B was trying to get is not in A's contacts. Then the A's phone would just burp with non compliance.
    07-23-2013 10:26 AM
  5. Aquila's Avatar
    The phone knows your voice from others.

    Transmitted through spacetime.
    07-23-2013 10:54 AM
  6. Armada's Avatar
    A good example of the rise of multithreading is in the amd 8 core processor. It has been out a while, but is now performing much better in newer games and programs than it has ever before with its heavily multithreading friendly architecture.

    Sent from my SCH-I535
    Yeah, but the average PC or laptop consumer ends up with some janky 4 core AMD or Intel Core i3 and just uses it to browse Facebook, Tumblr, and Reddit and listen to Spotify all day. All they care about is "will my computer be slow?", which is quite honestly on the storage media but as long as Internet Explorer doesn't take more than a second to load a page no one cares. And this is what the Moto X is aiming to do. If you try to explain phone specs to my mother or father they wouldn't know. My sister seems to grasps "more cores and RAM is faster," but faster doesn't matter when it comes to price. If the Moto X launches at a rumored low off contract price and low subsidized price it'll succeed.

    In fact, I wouldn't have a problem buying it because I just don't do anything besides use Chrome, Hangouts, and Facebook. Also two cores does not make it a dead-on-arrival phone that will lag into the sunset. It's an improved architecture, and unless you're doing benchmarking or serious number crunching on your phone you won't notice a difference. Just like how my sister won't notice a difference between a Core i3 and i5. Moto is unlikely to abandon it, seeing as even the darn Droid Bionic managed to get to 4.1. Even if it gets stuck software-wise Moto has done trade-up programs in the past. I certainly trust them a heck of a lot more than HTC (any other Bolt users feel burned still?) There's a lot more to consider than specs when it comes to the Moto X but hype probably hurt it in the eyes of the power users.
    clarker07 and JFH8 like this.
    07-23-2013 11:10 AM
  7. Clocks's Avatar
    The phone knows your voice from others.

    Transmitted through spacetime.
    That's probably a good thing. Otherwise it would be fun to walk into a moto event with a megaphone and yell "hello moto magic".
    07-23-2013 11:11 AM
  8. Clocks's Avatar
    Yeah, but the average PC or laptop consumer ends up with some janky 4 core AMD or Intel Core i3 and just uses it to browse Facebook, Tumblr, and Reddit and listen to Spotify all day. All they care about is "will my computer be slow?", which is quite honestly on the storage media but as long as Internet Explorer doesn't take more than a second to load a page no one cares. And this is what the Moto X is aiming to do. If you try to explain phone specs to my mother or father they wouldn't know. My sister seems to grasps "more cores and RAM is faster," but faster doesn't matter when it comes to price. If the Moto X launches at a rumored low off contract price and low subsidized price it'll succeed.

    In fact, I wouldn't have a problem buying it because I just don't do anything besides use Chrome, Hangouts, and Facebook. Also two cores does not make it a dead-on-arrival phone that will lag into the sunset. It's an improved architecture, and unless you're doing benchmarking or serious number crunching on your phone you won't notice a difference. Just like how my sister won't notice a difference between a Core i3 and i5. Moto is unlikely to abandon it, seeing as even the darn Droid Bionic managed to get to 4.1. Even if it gets stuck software-wise Moto has done trade-up programs in the past. I certainly trust them a heck of a lot more than HTC (any other Bolt users feel burned still?) There's a lot more to consider than specs when it comes to the Moto X but hype probably hurt it in the eyes of the power users.
    Yeah that nails it.

    I want chrome to open fast, I want messaging to open fast. I bought gta and played it for 10 minutes, but that's not really what I do. The moto x is a spec bump from the gs3 and if the price is right it's all most people need right now. For people who want/need more, there's a $649 phone for them.
    07-23-2013 11:12 AM
  9. elotrolado's Avatar
    For me "mid-range" is not an epithet. I am not interested in games/gaming, and will rarely run multiple apps, so don't need top spec CPU and graphics. I figure a mid-range phone for 2 years will be just right, as then there will some other great improvement I'll want at that time (even though I hate participating in this throw-away culture creating toxic materials on the planet). Getting the latest OS updates is also very important to me and I would like to know whether Motorola, as a Google company, will now be first in line with Nexus to receive updates? Also, bigger is worse, NOT better. I want a 4-4.3" screen in a pocketable phone; if the Moto is larger, I won't buy it. Other deal breakers: poor call quality, underperforming speakers. I'm leaning toward the HTC Mini at the moment, though wary of not getting OS updates from HTC, but I have a couple months to decide.
    07-23-2013 11:20 AM
  10. ultravisitor's Avatar
    Yeah, but the average PC or laptop consumer ends up with some janky 4 core AMD or Intel Core i3 and just uses it to browse Facebook, Tumblr, and Reddit and listen to Spotify all day. All they care about is "will my computer be slow?", which is quite honestly on the storage media but as long as Internet Explorer doesn't take more than a second to load a page no one cares. And this is what the Moto X is aiming to do.
    Real talk. I will not lie: my desktop has a Core i3 and guess what folks? IT'S FINE. It's all I need along with a huge hard drive for storage. I knew that when I bought it.
    07-23-2013 11:34 AM
  11. cgardnervt's Avatar
    Real talk. I will not lie: my desktop has a Core i3 and guess what folks? IT'S FINE. It's all I need along with a huge hard drive for storage. I knew that when I bought it.
    For you but I require an i5 cpu currently. So no glove is a one size fits all. Not sure why but people get all touchy when someone says the moto x phone isn't right for them. And the hype didn't live up to them in their eyes. No one is saying you can't enjoy. We are simply saying we will not enjoy it. It's just a matter of difference in opinion folks. No hate needed here.

    Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk 2
    07-23-2013 11:38 AM
  12. ultravisitor's Avatar
    For you but I require an i5 cpu currently.
    Yes, but the current argument about the Moto X is kind of like people talking about a desktop and saying, "OMG IF IT DOESN'T HAVE A CORE I7 THEN WHY DOES IT EVEN EXIST?"

    And really, the biggest reason why people are getting "all touchy" is because we don't actually know anything about the phone and the way it operates. People aren't even giving it a chance.
    07-23-2013 11:45 AM
  13. HNNNNNGHHH's Avatar
    The Moto X packs mid-tier specs for today's standards but even then, the Nexus line was more focused on software than actual hardware.

    Either way, it's nice to see a phone that's not overpowered and seemingly forced to compete in the smartphone industry's de-facto 'arms race'. (*cough* Samsung *cough)
    ryanidcomm and MERCDROID like this.
    07-23-2013 12:18 PM
  14. Demur's Avatar
    Well that depends on a few things.

    1: How far away are they. If say they are at the same table and B barks out a command to his phone A's phone might respond to.

    2: The command may be understood but not completed. As in your example, B issues a call someone to his phone. A's phone picks that up and tries to do the same thing. Only the person B was trying to get is not in A's contacts. Then the A's phone would just burp with non compliance.
    1) That's what I figured, but there are plenty of scenarios where that puts person B in range: people having conversations, in cars, in businesses, restaurants, schools, on buses and trains, etc. etc.

    2) Right. Just taking dialing as an example, there are a few scenarios I'm picturing.

    I) Person B knows person A and some of the contacts that would be in their phone. Person B is an *** and deliberatly commands the phone to dial someone that will result in an awkward situation for person A.

    II) Person B does not know person A, but is an ***, and deliberately commands the phone to dial someone using a common contact name (e.g. "Mom").

    III) What happens if 4 people are in a car, each with this phone, and one of them attempts to command their phone to dial "Mom" and they all happen to have that in their address book?

    "I" is probably the most concerning.

    Obviously these are moot points if the phone (reliably) recognizes your voice as NothingIsTrue says.


    The phone knows your voice from others.
    I was wondering about that. How reliable is that? And that means that if I hand the phone to a friend and ask them to call so and so, they won't be able to use the voice commands to do it?
    07-23-2013 12:19 PM
  15. mech1164's Avatar
    1) That's what I figured, but there are plenty of scenarios where that puts person B in range: people having conversations, in cars, in businesses, restaurants, schools, on buses and trains, etc. etc.

    2) Right. Just taking dialing as an example, there are a few scenarios I'm picturing.

    I) Person B knows person A and some of the contacts that would be in their phone. Person B is an *** and deliberatly commands the phone to dial someone that will result in an awkward situation for person A.

    II) Person B does not know person A, but is an ***, and deliberately commands the phone to dial someone using a common contact name (e.g. "Mom").

    III) What happens if 4 people are in a car, each with this phone, and one of them attempts to command their phone to dial "Mom" and they all happen to have that in their address book?

    "I" is probably the most concerning.

    Obviously these are moot points if the phone (reliably) recognizes your voice as NothingIsTrue says.




    I was wondering about that. How reliable is that? And that means that if I hand the phone to a friend and ask them to call so and so, they won't be able to use the voice commands to do it?
    In the end we don't know yet. Hopefully these things have been worked out in the beta test. Now if this was Microsoft this would be fixed sometime next year in a service pack. Or told it's a hidden feature, yeah right sure it is. ;-)

    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 4 Beta
    07-23-2013 12:24 PM
  16. ryanidcomm's Avatar
    SD card slot .. I was hoping for more ram.. its not always needed but makes a difference
    07-23-2013 01:41 PM
  17. Pollster's Avatar
    Three things could stop me buying this.
    1. A new Nexus which is not bigger than the Moto and doesn't have worse battery life. Possibly just a new Nexus even if it is bigger and has worse battery life.
    2. Bad reviews by people who actually own and use the thing after it comes out. I'm not upgrading until Fall, so there will be plenty of time for pioneers to tell me if it's good.
    3. Since I am not upgrading until the fall, another non-Nexus could come out and be better than this phone and the Nexus.

    Did I mention I am a fan of Nexus phones a million times? Item 1 is the thing most likely to keep me from buying this phone.
    07-23-2013 02:17 PM
  18. NoYankees44's Avatar
    In the end we don't know yet. Hopefully these things have been worked out in the beta test. Now if this was Microsoft this would be fixed sometime next year in a service pack. Or told it's a hidden feature, yeah right sure it is. ;-)

    Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk 4 Beta
    And if it were apple they would charge you money for the same service pack but call it a different cat ;-)

    Sent from my SCH-I535
    07-23-2013 02:17 PM
  19. Ry's Avatar
    The DROID MINI may keep me from getting a MOTO X.
    07-23-2013 02:19 PM
  20. jbruha's Avatar
    then without question the Galaxy Nexus should be faster than the Droid DNA
    I like his logic. "If all-my-anecdotal-and-strictly-personal-experiences, than Galaxy Nexus is faster than DNA." Makes perfect sense.

    I had some more thoughts regarding the Moto X being regarded as midrange following the history of what we've learned about Motorola's new devices. It started with the rumor about a powerhouse device with tons of cores dedicated to different functions called the X Phone, no specs. Then we start to get all these ridiculous leaks and see that benchmarks have reported its internals as a version of the Qualcomm MSM8960T with 2GB of RAM, a chip we've seen before, though not this variant, and not with 2GB of RAM paired with it. (this is the part where the internet starts throwing the term "midrange" around left and right). Then today, we have the new Droid announcement and find out Motorola's using "their own" 8-core SoC called the X8 that sounds awfully like the chip previously rumored for the still yet unrevealed X Phone.

    I'm purely speculating here, but what if the X8 is an Qualcomm MSM8960T modified with additional cores as rumored? Given that the new Droids require a separate core dedicated to the always-listening microphone, it makes sense for the Moto X to require the same or similar chipset.

    If that's the case, and given what we know so far, I'm still okay with that, especially given the rumored price of this device. It seems that's the general theme of the disinterest in this phone: nobody thinks it makes sense to buy a Moto X for all that it is if you could buy an S4 or One for the same price. I agree, but it sounds like we won't have to worry about The Moto X being as expensive as the "high end" devices of this year.
    Ry, ultravisitor and MERCDROID like this.
    07-23-2013 02:21 PM
  21. Ry's Avatar
    I like his logic. "If all-my-anecdotal-and-strictly-personal-experiences, than Galaxy Nexus is faster than DNA." Makes perfect sense.

    I had some more thoughts regarding the Moto X being regarded as midrange following the history of what we've learned about Motorola's new devices. It started with the rumor about a powerhouse device with tons of cores dedicated to different functions called the X Phone, no specs. Then we start to get all these ridiculous leaks and see that benchmarks have reported its internals as a version of the Qualcomm MSM8960T with 2GB of RAM, a chip we've seen before, though not this variant, and not with 2GB of RAM paired with it. (this is the part where the internet starts throwing the term "midrange" around left and right). Then today, we have the new Droid announcement and find out Motorola's using "their own" 8-core SoC called the X8 that sounds awfully like the chip previously rumored for the still yet unrevealed X Phone.

    I'm purely speculating here, but what if the X8 is an Qualcomm MSM8960T modified with additional cores as rumored? Given that the new Droids require a separate core dedicated to the always-listening microphone, it makes sense for the Moto X to require the same or similar chipset.

    If that's the case, and given what we know so far, I'm still okay with that, especially given the rumored price of this device. It seems that's the general theme of the disinterest in this phone: nobody thinks it makes sense to buy a Moto X for all that it is if you could buy an S4 or One for the same price. I agree, but it sounds like we won't have to worry about The Moto X being as expensive as the "high end" devices of this year.
    The internet believes all rumors to be true.
    07-23-2013 02:23 PM
  22. karn101's Avatar
    I like his logic. "If all-my-anecdotal-and-strictly-personal-experiences, than Galaxy Nexus is faster than DNA." Makes perfect sense.

    I had some more thoughts regarding the Moto X being regarded as midrange following the history of what we've learned about Motorola's new devices. It started with the rumor about a powerhouse device with tons of cores dedicated to different functions called the X Phone, no specs. Then we start to get all these ridiculous leaks and see that benchmarks have reported its internals as a version of the Qualcomm MSM8960T with 2GB of RAM, a chip we've seen before, though not this variant, and not with 2GB of RAM paired with it. (this is the part where the internet starts throwing the term "midrange" around left and right). Then today, we have the new Droid announcement and find out Motorola's using "their own" 8-core SoC called the X8 that sounds awfully like the chip previously rumored for the still yet unrevealed X Phone.

    I'm purely speculating here, but what if the X8 is an Qualcomm MSM8960T modified with additional cores as rumored? Given that the new Droids require a separate core dedicated to the always-listening microphone, it makes sense for the Moto X to require the same or similar chipset.

    If that's the case, and given what we know so far, I'm still okay with that, especially given the rumored price of this device. It seems that's the general theme of the disinterest in this phone: nobody thinks it makes sense to buy a Moto X for all that it is if you could buy an S4 or One for the same price. I agree, but it sounds like we won't have to worry about The Moto X being as expensive as the "high end" devices of this year.
    You hit the nail on the head. The Moto X has the same processor as the Droid Ultra and the Droid Maxx which is MSM8960DT.

    This is why people need to chill with rumors. But now I wonder, where does the cost savings come into effect?

    Sent from my HTC6435LVW using Tapatalk 2
    07-23-2013 05:08 PM
  23. jbruha's Avatar
    You hit the nail on the head. The Moto X has the same processor as the Droid Ultra and the Droid Maxx which is MSM8960DT.

    This is why people need to chill with rumors. But now I wonder, where does the cost savings come into effect?

    Sent from my HTC6435LVW using Tapatalk 2
    I saw your other thread and now I'm starting to wonder the same thing. All we've heard are rumors so far though, so there's nothing to guarantee we're getting a lost cost unsubsidized Moto X. We'll just have to see.

    Where are all the "midrange" haters now that we're finding out that the Moto X has FOUR more cores than any of the quad-cores available now, lol???
    07-23-2013 05:31 PM
  24. Roundpotato's Avatar
    Where are all the "midrange" haters now that we're finding out that the Moto X has FOUR more cores than any of the quad-cores available now, lol???
    Oh please, don't make me die from laughter. If we can just count the GPU cores as part of the CPU, then I guess Tegra phones are 17 core phones because their GPUs have like 12 cores.
    07-23-2013 09:02 PM
  25. Armada's Avatar
    Oh please, don't make me die from laughter. If we can just count the GPU cores as part of the CPU, then I guess Tegra phones are 17 core phones because their GPUs have like 12 cores.
    And AMD says they have 8 cores when they are really 4 modules. It is all marketing games. If anything at least they're using some dedicated cores to handle some stuff to let the dual core be less "weak" than some have already started honking about.
    07-23-2013 09:24 PM
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