12-07-2015 07:01 PM
46 12
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  1. Aquila's Avatar
    Why is it disappointing? Doesn't affect the phone's dimensions and the Moto X has the same internal storage options available (up to 64gb) as last year without an SD slot. You don't have to use it.
    Opportunity cost. It took time and money to engineer it from a physical standpoint, it took time and money to create the software and it takes time and money for every software update that they decide to push (prior to MM) for coding around it. Moto made some pretty deliberate decisions on the feature set, etc. in order to hit some specific price points. My preference (not shared by many here) is for them to not include this feature in favor of either having more time and money available to speed up software updates and/or to spend on better features or quality control, etc.
    11-19-2015 03:52 PM
  2. dmark44's Avatar
    I thought there was already better built in support for SD cards baked into Android so it would be handled more consistently between manufacturers.

    I know in earlier versions HTC and Samsung all had their own way of implementing external storage. Made it difficult for app developers to access.
    matthelm007 likes this.
    11-19-2015 04:58 PM
  3. hbar98's Avatar
    I won't be using adoptable storage, just portable. I have the 32gig version and a 64gig Samsung Class 10 Pro+ something-or-other card that is supposed to get up to 90megs/sec read (haven't done a test in the phone yet).

    I had a scare the other day that reinforced my decision not to use adoptable storage: my phone decided to declare the SD card corrupt. It wasn't until I took the card out, did the old trick of running scandisk on the card (which found no errors, and was easily browsed in the computer). I put the card back into the phone, and it still didn't want to read the card until I went into the settings and remounted the card.

    The SD card isn't the only point of failure in this chain.
    11-20-2015 07:37 AM
  4. Stanley Kubrick's Avatar
    Personally I never use one and really don't need to. I always get the largest internal memory/storage available which has always been enough for me. I simply do not trust these little cards. There are so many horror stories all across the internet on how people have lost irreplaceable pictures stored on them. Most people now use the cloud as a backup for their cards. I just go straight to the cloud. Same issue with using them under MM as part of the internal storage to hold apps. One failed card equals a mess! I see them going the way of the floppy disk very soon. Just a matter of time. Did having one on the Pure increase sales? Who knows for sure without a controlled accurate poll. Could the money have been spent on a fingerprint reader, or FM radio receiver? Sure. Would any of those items have had any real effect on sales? Who knows? I bought the Pure because it is CARRIER FREE! I think that is it's best selling feature hands down, with price being next, and then Moto's built in features.
    11-20-2015 08:30 AM
  5. TenshiNo's Avatar
    The problem with SD Cards (historically) is that they are formatted using the FAT32 file system, which has been around for two decades, because that made them universally readable by just about anything out there. The problem is that FAT32 does not support *any* file permissions, so it's the wild west and any app could do anything it wanted with any file. The problem comes in when one app modifies another app's file(s) in an attempt to "trick" the other app into doing something "bad". Or when badly written apps store sensitive data (say, your bank acct info) on the SD Card where any other app could read it.

    With Android 4.4, Google changed the way SDCards were handled so that apps could only write to pre-determined folder paths on the SDCard, and only using a special API which forced the app to define the type of data that was being read/written. That way you don't have an app "accidentally" executing code because it was trying to read an MP3. The stops the first problem listed above, which closed a fairly major security whole within Android.

    With Android 6.0 (Marshmallow) Google has finally "fixed" the issue for real. You can continue to use your SDCard as a standard SDCard, but only certain file types can be saved (so apps can't misbehave) or you can choose to integrate it with the device's internal storage. If you choose to integrate it with the device's internal storage, it will be formatted using a Linux-based file-system (like ext4) that supports the same file-level permissions as the device's internal storage (which is already formatted with that file-system). Anything that gets stored on the card will be accessible using the MTP interface when plugging in your phone, but will not necessarily be accessible if you took the SDCard out of the phone and stuck it in an SDCard reader. This is a combination of Windows PC's not being able to read ext4 (or whatever file-system they use) and the file-level permissions which define "who" is allowed to access what file(s).

    This is probably the best way that Google could have possibly implemented SDCard support. It still allows the flexibility of extending your device's internal storage, without opening up security holes by having a completely unregulated file-system in the device. Even Microsoft abandoned FAT32 more than a decade ago, for the same reason: it is impossible to have good security on any system that stores data without any kind of permission model.

    And to anyone concerned about increased hardware/development costs associated with including an SDCard slot, the fact that Google has made this change means that Samsung/HTC/Moto/etc no longer have to try and build their own systems to deal with this security vulnerability, so that should be a non-issue. The hardware itself wouldn't cost an OEM more than $1 per device, and doing trace mapping on the board to support the slot is something that only has to be done once when initially designing the device.
    Shimon Mor, spwexler and ScottsoNJ like this.
    11-20-2015 03:35 PM
  6. Hendry775's Avatar
    The problem with SD Cards (historically) is that they are formatted using the FAT32 file system, which has been around for two decades, because that made them universally readable by just about anything out there. The problem is that FAT32 does not support *any* file permissions, so it's the wild west and any app could do anything it wanted with any file. The problem comes in when one app modifies another app's file(s) in an attempt to "trick" the other app into doing something "bad". Or when badly written apps store sensitive data (say, your bank acct info) on the SD Card where any other app could read it.

    With Android 4.4, Google changed the way SDCards were handled so that apps could only write to pre-determined folder paths on the SDCard, and only using a special API which forced the app to define the type of data that was being read/written. That way you don't have an app "accidentally" executing code because it was trying to read an MP3. The stops the first problem listed above, which closed a fairly major security whole within Android.

    With Android 6.0 (Marshmallow) Google has finally "fixed" the issue for real. You can continue to use your SDCard as a standard SDCard, but only certain file types can be saved (so apps can't misbehave) or you can choose to integrate it with the device's internal storage. If you choose to integrate it with the device's internal storage, it will be formatted using a Linux-based file-system (like ext4) that supports the same file-level permissions as the device's internal storage (which is already formatted with that file-system). Anything that gets stored on the card will be accessible using the MTP interface when plugging in your phone, but will not necessarily be accessible if you took the SDCard out of the phone and stuck it in an SDCard reader. This is a combination of Windows PC's not being able to read ext4 (or whatever file-system they use) and the file-level permissions which define "who" is allowed to access what file(s).

    This is probably the best way that Google could have possibly implemented SDCard support. It still allows the flexibility of extending your device's internal storage, without opening up security holes by having a completely unregulated file-system in the device. Even Microsoft abandoned FAT32 more than a decade ago, for the same reason: it is impossible to have good security on any system that stores data without any kind of permission model.

    And to anyone concerned about increased hardware/development costs associated with including an SDCard slot, the fact that Google has made this change means that Samsung/HTC/Moto/etc no longer have to try and build their own systems to deal with this security vulnerability, so that should be a non-issue. The hardware itself wouldn't cost an OEM more than $1 per device, and doing trace mapping on the board to support the slot is something that only has to be done once when initially designing the device.
    Well said, thanks for the information!

    Posted via the Android Central App
    11-20-2015 07:27 PM
  7. rushmore's Avatar
    Well said, thanks for the information!

    Posted via the Android Central App
    Historically is correct, though exfat works fine with Lollipop on up and that is what cards are formatted in now. Fat32 is not a good option with Lollipop and Marshmallow. Also does not handle large files.
    11-21-2015 01:11 PM
  8. travaz's Avatar
    I have a 64GB Pure and only use the SD card (Sony Class 10 64 GB ) for Media. When I travel I want the option of taking the card from my phone(use Phone for Music) and putting it in my Tablet to watch a Movie on the bigger screen. So I will stay Portable
    dmark44 likes this.
    11-22-2015 11:38 AM
  9. ManiacalMF's Avatar
    So what are the definitive pros and cons to using the adoptable storage? Would you be able to sideload apps? Would you be able to take that adoptable storage card and put it in a different device (that also presumably has Marshmallow installed)?, etc. Can someone make a list of the pros and cons?
    11-25-2015 03:51 PM
  10. Aquila's Avatar
    So what are the definitive pros and cons to using the adoptable storage? Would you be able to sideload apps? Would you be able to take that adoptable storage card and put it in a different device (that also presumably has Marshmallow installed)?, etc. Can someone make a list of the pros and cons?
    The card would be tied to the specific device you formatted it in and would be unusable in all other devices. The adoptable storage basically "becomes" additional internal storage, so everything you can do with internal storage can be done with the sd card at that point.
    dmark44 likes this.
    11-25-2015 05:18 PM
  11. Repr1sal's Avatar
    Im going internal. Cheaped out and got the 16gb version in anticipation of M implememting this feature. Plus the sim/sd hatch feels like something will break eventually....its just so delicate. Also the hatch isnt accesible with my supcase.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    Westiemom likes this.
    11-26-2015 08:58 AM
  12. n8prkr's Avatar
    What do you guys think of this card?

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00X1404E4...cUvbUpU4861972

    Posted via the Android Central App
    11-28-2015 02:50 PM
  13. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    What do you guys think of this card?

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00X1404E4...cUvbUpU4861981

    Posted via the Android Central App
    Sony should be decent.
    11-28-2015 02:52 PM
  14. n8prkr's Avatar
    It just seems too affordable to be really good. I'm trying to get the most bang for my buck.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    11-28-2015 02:55 PM
  15. Westiemom's Avatar
    Im going internal. Cheaped out and got the 16gb version in anticipation of M implememting this feature. Plus the sim/sd hatch feels like something will break eventually....its just so delicate. Also the hatch isnt accesible with my supcase.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    I did the same thing, probably not that well thought out considering the cost of a top quality SD card - should of paid the $50 extra to go at least 32GB, but oh well.
    I got a SanDisk Extreme that should be fine becoming permanent internal storage, or so I'm hoping...

    Posted via the Android Central App
    11-28-2015 03:11 PM
  16. Aquila's Avatar
    Question just became a moot point for me. My MXPE died yesterday and I'm probably not going to spend the money to fix it.
    11-28-2015 05:19 PM
  17. krazyatom's Avatar
    Question just became a moot point for me. My MXPE died yesterday and I'm probably not going to spend the money to fix it.
    You still have a year warranty. Go get it exchanged.
    dmark44 likes this.
    11-28-2015 05:34 PM
  18. n8prkr's Avatar
    Ended up going with this one

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B010NE3N3S...cUvbUpU4864721

    Posted via the Android Central App
    Westiemom likes this.
    11-30-2015 07:11 AM
  19. Ntchwaidumela's Avatar
    I got the 64GB version just so I wouldn't have to use my SD card for internal storage. I'm happy with that decision because I can still use it as portable storage in any other device.

    Posted via Android Central App
    Laura Knotek and Aquila like this.
    12-06-2015 10:13 PM
  20. TJH132's Avatar
    What would be the best card for adopted storage? I've heard conflicting things about Class 10 vs the others.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    12-07-2015 06:47 PM
  21. Laura Knotek's Avatar
    What would be the best card for adopted storage? I've heard conflicting things about Class 10 vs the others.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    From this article: Inside Marshmallow: Adoptable storage http://www.androidcentral.com/inside...ptable-storage

    "When you get a phone with Marshmallow and an SD card slot, I recommend using the fastest SD card you can find that's supported. Class 10 and UHS are words to look for."
    TenshiNo likes this.
    12-07-2015 07:01 PM
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