01-18-2010 04:11 PM
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  1. 6tr6tr's Avatar
    - Android is open source, webOS is not. Yet it seems to me that maybe webOS is more accessible and therefore more 'open' even though it's not technically open source.
    Actually WebOS is a mixture of open source and closed source code, and it's actually MOSTLY open source. Aside from all the apps in Javascript+HTML+CSS (which by their nature are open source), they've actually released almost all the webOS code as open source:

    Welcome to opensource.palm.com - Palm

    There's actually very little code that is not open source.

    - I see Pros and Cons to the notification systems on both webOS and Android. I like Android's "clear all" button, but I also like the ability to dismiss notifications one-by-one on webOS. Do you have a preference?
    I agree, but I wish webOS had the ability to do both. I think webOS does alerts/notifications and multitasking more seamlessly (and non-intrusively) than any other mobile OS.

    - How do you rate the various touchscreen keyboards on Android?
    Not sure about others but I found that while the HTC Hero is more accurate than the Palm Pre, you have to push a lot harder - it takes more effort to type something than a touch screen keyboard should. The Pre's touchscreen felt smoother but again, the android was much more accurate with figuring out where I meant to click and a little faster in registering that click.

    - Does the fact that different Android phones have different versions of the OS bother you?
    As a user, no. As a developer, yes. But Palm has that too. Not only Pixi vs Pre (diff. screen sizes) but now the Plus vs non-plus.
    01-14-2010 10:57 PM
  2. wildgoosey32's Avatar
    Hey all,

    I'm hopping over from PreCentral to talk about my 30 day experience with the Sprint HTC Hero. I now own a Palm Pixi.

    I liked:
    -Web browsing with the big beautiful screen. It was a real treat.
    -Customizing with all of my widgets.
    -Notifications staying out of the way until I want them (much like WebOS)
    -The big clock with the little moving weather icons

    Why I took it back:
    -LLLLAAAAAGGGGGG...no matter how hard I tried, I couldn't get it to run properly, or at least what I thought was properly. I put on a taskkiller..then someone told me to take it off, so I did...then I created new SenseUI screens to try and see if it was my widgets or what I had running in the background, and it did run a little smoother when I stripped it down. I still had terrible lag in the keyboard...like it would get three words behind when I was typing, then when it caught up, it wouldn't auto-correct those words...argh! It was so frustrating.

    In the end, I decided I liked the features - in your face multitasking, swiping to end apps, the physical keyboard on my Pixi (which is second to none), and simplicity of WebOS over what I liked about Android, and I took my Hero back. In fairness, I only had 1.5...I'm sure newer versions are much better, or maybe the hardware on the Hero isn't as good? I don't know. That's my two cents.

    Thanks!
    Annie
    01-15-2010 12:22 AM
  3. Fobok's Avatar
    I can't actually comment as a user as I have no smartphone yet, (thus my trying to post regularly for this contest), but I have to say I love the look of WebOS in general. It's the fact that the phones aren't available on Rogers that keeps me away.

    Still, I like Android better from what I've seen for a couple of reasons. Mainly, the Google integration (I'm a big Google user), and the apps. (And, on the Nexus one, the voice recognition. Though, it'd probably have trouble with my voice. I have a chronic cough and my voice is all croaky all the time.)
    01-15-2010 01:37 AM
  4. nihouma's Avatar
    - Android is open source, webOS is not. Yet it seems to me that maybe webOS is more accessible and therefore more 'open' even though it's not technically open source.
    Currently I am running Android on an HTC Touch, which originally runs Windows Mobile. If it weren't for Google open sourcing Android, this never would have been a possibility for me, and I would be stuck with Windows Mobile. From a consumer standpoint, Android seems more open only because of all the manufacturer's using it.


    - I see Pros and Cons to the notification systems on both webOS and Android. I like Android's "clear all" button, but I also like the ability to dismiss notifications one-by-one on webOS. Do you have a preference?
    Personally, Android's notifications system feels more unified to me than webOS, only from a graphical perspective. I definitely would like a way to clear notifications one-by-one without going into different apps, but notifications still feel more suited to my needs on android.

    - Do you use a task manager app on Android? Which Android phone do you have? Is a task manager necessary?

    The custom build I am using has Advanced Task Killer installed by default, but I never use it. The phone I'm using is an old WinMo phone with little Ram, but Android handles background processes well enough that I never notice. I'd say a task manager isn't necessary at all unless you want that control, but a quick, and graphically flashy way to multi-task would be beautiful \


    - How do you rate the various touchscreen keyboards on Android?

    The only ones I have used are the HTC Keyboard, and the default Google one. The Google one works well enough that the average user wouldn't care, but the HTC Keyboard is fantastic when it comes to spell correction, which is important when typing on a resistive screen with fingers. I'd say it even beats the iPhone's, from what I've seen using other peoples.


    - Does the fact that different Android phones have different versions of the OS bother you?

    Does it bother me? Yes. Will the average user notice? I don't think they will until they find bump into someone with another Android phone, and notice that other person's phone has a feature their own doesn't.

    But when you look at the Linux world in general, it is both a blessing, and a curse. Sure, it makes it hard to provide a unified front, like iPhone has, but one doesn't have to mold themselves to the phone. It is like when you and your friends are eating ice cream. You can try different flavors, the flavors that suit your tastebuds. But you and your friends are all still having the same thing: ice cream.


    - Is Android accessible to the average, non-geek user. I think the answer is yes... but how could it be better?

    The thing that would make Android more accessible to the average user is something Android already has: a setup tutorial the user has to go through. Does it help acclimate the user? Yes. Does it show them how to copy and paste? No.

    It doesn't even tell them how to install apps. I know enough average users of iPhone and Android to know that most have no idea you can install apps from the App Store/Marketplace.

    I think webOS is better about acclimating the end user, and Google needs to get better at this if they want people using Android to use the mobile web (if only for their profit margins)
    01-15-2010 02:54 AM
  5. sethjk's Avatar
    Howdy all!

    As I compare webOS to Android I have a few things on my mind:

    - Android is open source, webOS is not. Yet it seems to me that maybe webOS is more accessible and therefore more 'open' even though it's not technically open source.
    - I see Pros and Cons to the notification systems on both webOS and Android. I like Android's "clear all" button, but I also like the ability to dismiss notifications one-by-one on webOS. Do you have a preference?
    - Do you use a task manager app on Android? Which Android phone do you have? Is a task manager necessary?
    - How do you rate the various touchscreen keyboards on Android?
    - Does the fact that different Android phones have different versions of the OS bother you?
    - Is Android accessible to the average, non-geek user. I think the answer is yes... but how could it be better?
    -I would like to be able to dismiss notifications one at a time, but the clear all works just fine for me. Plus, you can open the notification which clears it.

    -I use Advanced task manager on my droid. The Droid is pretty good at running itself so its not really necessary. It was though on the Eris which I had for 3 weeks.

    -On my droid, I've downloaded and installed SWYPE which is the single greatest thing to come to touchscreens. It's still got a few bugs (auto-capitilization after periods and double spacing) but its great. I've used the physical keyboard exactly ONCE, just to try and see how it works. Though, it is quite necessary for some cutting/pasting operations.

    -I think there needs to be consistency with regard to the OS's. It was annoying that I could only ahve 1.5 on my Eris and I'm eagerly awaiting 2.1. Plus, I know it makes it more difficult for app developers.

    -Android OS is accessible to the average non-geek user. Though, it just isn't as intuitive as the Iphone OS. That being said, there's so much more you can do with it and it's not a difficult OS to figure out. Though some things are just a little too buried in menus. Plus, when I hit the menu button, I want all the options to come up, and not have to hit more.
    01-15-2010 09:27 AM
  6. ads's Avatar
    I'm on AT&T, probably to stay looking at my corp discount and 3G availability in my area; was waiting on a Pre, but now looking hard at an Android phone. Maybe it's a matter of if either has a real offering to replace my Treo680 and stop my wife's good-natured ribbing for an iphone!
    On topic, I can adjust, and LIKE to adjust, to new technologies, it keeps my brain fresh, so not hung up on hard/soft keyboards and the like, even though I'm <gasp> over 50!
    On whole, reading everything I can, I'd say hardware, available apps, openness goes to Androids. Operating system and UI and polish, clearly Palm/WebOS, and probably that will increase as the GPU *and hopefully other internals WebOS programming doesn't lend itself to today* gets exploited. From what I read, the PDA centric apps I use the most are better on WebOS, and I like synergy capability.
    Supporting infrastructures & ecosystem(s): Honestly, if google gets to where they offer a Nexus type product on any carrier, the whole open thing is like open squared. I'd never buy into the Apple ecosystem, for example. My concern watching AT&T CES pitch and having worked with parts of them as both a vendor and a customer is that they appear to do what any large IT company does, standardize the crap out of everything for cost reasons, like dumb-phone messaging, app store stuff we saw in CES. In essence, more control to save costs, and it fits the vast majority of folks who aren't on these tech forums. Like I think most of us here, all I want is bandwidth, coverage, pricepoint. Lest you think I'm digressing to a carrier discussion, the tie in goes back to Openness and Nexus One. If they can produce a product (or product set) that works anywhere, I'm probably going to reward them with my purchase even if I like the Pre better, because my gas and electric companies don't tell me what appliances I can buy, and I hate my bandwidth provider trying to control what hardware, and worse, what apps I use.
    ADS
    01-15-2010 09:30 AM
  7. Thespis721's Avatar
    I think WebOS needs to have the variety of form factors Android is available in. I have friends that will ONLY buy horizontal sliders, or ONLY buy tablets formats and want a virtual keyboard, not the thicker phone a physical keyboard requires. I love my Pre, but a lot of folks won't even consider WebOS until it's available on the form factor of their choice.
    That kind of alls in line of one of my feelings towards purchasing a Droid over a Palm. When I was testing out the Palm in store, I found myself constantly closing the Palm because I wanted to keep the size smaller and focus on the screen. Of course, there was constant need to open it up for the keyboard, which, petty as it may sound, actually annoyed me.

    Though I do hear that the Pre Plus has a better slider mechanism that is much more enjoyable.
    01-15-2010 09:40 AM
  8. corneliused's Avatar
    I would be interested in hearing a comparison of the multitasking on androids vs. webos. Particularly playing music and doing other stuff, like surfing the web or texting or some such. I suppose its somewhat phone specific, but pre vs moment would be most interesting for me since I'm on sprint.
    01-15-2010 10:13 AM
  9. Thespis721's Avatar
    Pre v. Moment
    Pre v. Hero
    Pre v. Droid

    Those are good multi-tasking points since they are different levels. The interesting thing I find is even though the blogs laud the Hero as one of the most amazing phones for Android, but all I hear from the forums is how it's laggy, hard to deal with, etc. I was in a Sprint store the other day and I felt the Hero was a little difficult to use compared to other Android phones, even compared to the Eris.
    01-15-2010 10:18 AM
  10. HardcorePooka's Avatar
    Contest entry, woo!

    I will say that I have used both WebOS & Android(Not extensively, but enough to get an okay feel for them). I like android more, but I'm a techie. I love playing with stuff and customizing and all that sort of stuff. I liked WebOS but had some issues when I first used it(very shortly after the Pre came out) and haven't had a chance to try it since then. I thought some of the things WebOS did were nice, but I have to say I'd much prefer Android as my "daily driver".
    01-15-2010 11:24 AM
  11. SirThale's Avatar
    Looking forward to reading your review - I'm likely to get either an Android phone or a Palm Pre for my next cell phone, so your impressions will be valuable to me!
    01-15-2010 11:34 AM
  12. klebron23's Avatar
    Contest entry! Want that Droid!
    01-15-2010 11:35 AM
  13. Thespis721's Avatar
    Are we supposed to say contest entry? If so... um... contest entry? I just figured we can enjoy the conversation.
    01-15-2010 11:36 AM
  14. trevoreon's Avatar
    Contest entry? :]
    01-15-2010 01:00 PM
  15. edrdoberts's Avatar
    What really makes Android open source from a consumer standpoint outside of the fact that manufactures can use the OS freely and WebOS is tied to Palm? Do developers have more freedom? From what I've been following with the Pre, Palm practically invites you to hack/homebrew WebOS.
    01-15-2010 02:15 PM
  16. Thespis721's Avatar
    Well now that they released their SDK, it definitely is more open to the public. At least, that was my understanding.
    01-15-2010 02:22 PM
  17. AZbear's Avatar
    contest entry post
    01-15-2010 02:23 PM
  18. simp_10's Avatar
    Another entry to win!
    01-15-2010 03:06 PM
  19. ardoreal's Avatar
    It's harder to make rich and beautiful applications on Android. We have functional, but not aesthetically pleasing apps. From what I recall the Pre had some very nice and clean applications. Just not very many of them
    01-15-2010 04:31 PM
  20. AndrewWestSide's Avatar
    another Round Robin entry!
    01-15-2010 04:33 PM
  21. pbrennan42's Avatar
    I think the aesthetics side of Android Applications are purely the remit of the developers, and not a problem with the platform at all.

    Both Beautiful Widgets and Weather Widgets - Donate are rather gorgeous, so it is not a platform issue at all. Some application developers really need to raise their game in Android somewhat.

    Phil.
    01-15-2010 05:07 PM
  22. Thespis721's Avatar
    But what makes the developers on the Android fail at aesthetics. I realize that the Apple OS is a completely closed OS that requires scrutiny from Apple in order to make it happen. But why is WebOS so much prettier then Android apps-wise?
    01-15-2010 05:45 PM
  23. o14's Avatar
    What really makes Android open source from a consumer standpoint outside of the fact that manufactures can use the OS freely and WebOS is tied to Palm? Do developers have more freedom? From what I've been following with the Pre, Palm practically invites you to hack/homebrew WebOS.
    I'm not too much of a technical person, so what 'open source' means confuses me. From everything I've seen on Precentral, I have to agree with you, Palm pretty much says go for it. But perhaps I just don't understand what open source means.
    01-15-2010 07:20 PM
  24. leonl's Avatar
    Another entry...
    01-16-2010 02:32 AM
  25. nihouma's Avatar
    But what makes the developers on the Android fail at aesthetics. I realize that the Apple OS is a completely closed OS that requires scrutiny from Apple in order to make it happen. But why is WebOS so much prettier then Android apps-wise?
    I think it might be the fact that webOS has an app approval process also (doesn't it?). That or the programs make themselves pretty thanks to the SDK, unlike android...
    01-16-2010 03:09 AM
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