03-19-2013 10:01 AM
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  1. jdbii's Avatar
    We're not going to get a 5th party ubiquitous LTE provider naturally through our market, no matter how much the consumers may want such a service.
    Yes, it will never happen naturally through our current market. But if the political will existed Congress could always change the law -- rewrite the Telecom Act, dissolve the FCC, enact tough anti-trust telecom legislation.
    Tall Mike 2145 likes this.
    03-16-2013 10:01 PM
  2. jdbii's Avatar
    First off, I would dispute that Europeans or Australians/New Zealanders get more for their money. It's my understanding (unless something has changed and I haven't heard about it) that they pay more for less, in no small part due to taxes.
    You certainly know your stuff. Kind of worrisome if what you say about companies that own news media are military contractors.

    To you point about Europeans/Australians paying more for less -- please clarify. Is what you mean is that Europeans/Australians pay more because of their overall higher tax burden rather than having higher cell phones bills? I seen the posts by Europeans here and other forums, and I get the impression that their cell phone bills and wireless data bills are a lot lower than those in the USA.
    03-16-2013 10:12 PM
  3. Tall Mike 2145's Avatar
    You certainly know your stuff. Kind of worrisome if what you say about companies that own news media are military contractors.

    To you point about Europeans/Australians paying more for less -- please clarify. Is what you mean is that Europeans/Australians pay more because of their overall higher tax burden rather than having higher cell phones bills? I seen the posts by Europeans here and other forums, and I get the impression that their cell phone bills and wireless data bills are a lot lower than those in the USA.
    I'm definitely talking about taxes. I'd actually love to hear from our European and other friends on here about what they're paying. I looked at O2, and for 36 (~ $54.40) they get unlimited text, voice, and 2GB data on a monthly plan. I value data more than talk time, so that is a bias of how I'm looking at this.

    EDIT: I deleted another post and added a reply in this one.

    As far as I know, the two sets of frequencies (let's just call them AT&T's frequencies and T-Mobile's frequencies) are pretty much standard around the world.

    Also, you can't bring any random CDMA phone to Sprint or Verizon and get service. They'll only give you service on a phone that comes from them. So, "unlocking" per se really only exists with GSM phones. If you use Sprint or Verizon, you're pretty much stuck.
    jdbii likes this.
    03-16-2013 10:22 PM
  4. palandri's Avatar
    My wife is French, so we go over to France a couple of times a year. They have really good rates (half of what we pay) when you combine TV, Internet, Home Phone and Cell Phone. Here are the rates from Orange, there are cheaper packages available. The webpage is in French, but it's pretty easy to figure out. plus tax is included in the price.

    La gamme Orange Open : internet-TV-tlphone + mobile - Orange
    jdbii likes this.
    03-17-2013 05:39 PM
  5. Paul627g's Avatar
    I think the easiest answers are the US carriers drive the costs up and federal, state and local taxes on communications hits everyone.

    and last and most important.. Were the United States of America.. We have to be different and attempt to be above and beyond everyone else and in the process we (the little man) get socked with the costs.
    03-17-2013 05:55 PM
  6. jdbii's Avatar
    4000 percent profit.

    An article on today's NY Times homepage mentions that cell phone companies make a 4000 percent profit on text messages. (Based on the study of an Ontario university professor). Numbers, figures, and statistics can be presented in various forms and likewise disputed in the same fashion, but the windfall carriers make off of text messages has always stuck me as being way out of whack.

    Today's article:
    Disruptions: Stuck With a Carrier for the Long Haul - NYTimes.com

    The source the article quoted for the 4000 percent markup:
    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/10/te...nted=all&_r=2&
    Aquila likes this.
    03-18-2013 01:25 PM
  7. Tall Mike 2145's Avatar
    Here's a quick shout-out to rexxman for correcting me on including McDonnell Douglas, which no longer exists because it is a part of Boeing.
    03-18-2013 06:54 PM
  8. kilofoxtrot's Avatar
    US consumers want it both ways... subsidized phones and cheap plans.
    03-18-2013 08:55 PM
  9. Tall Mike 2145's Avatar
    And why shouldn't we? We've been enculturated over the past at least 25+ years (or more) to expect more for less. We are a Walmart culture, where cheaper is better, and where we scream bloody murder about man's inhumanity to man until it interferes with our ability to get cheap stuff. We have no long-term memory, and our short-term memory is getting pretty dodgy pretty quickly.

    Quick story: College friend of mine was relating to me the other day that in a class she is taking, she had occasion to bring up Jerry Seinfeld in class, and half or more of them were like, "Jerry who?"
    Aquila and jdbii like this.
    03-18-2013 09:05 PM
  10. Mooncatt's Avatar
    And why shouldn't we? We've been enculturated over the past at least 25+ years (or more) to expect more for less. We are a Walmart culture, where cheaper is better...
    And what is the quality of the cheap stuff typically found at Walmart. Not that good when you look at what other places offer. Reminds me of a proverb or something I came across the other day: It's the frugal man that spends the most.

    Basically meaning when you buy cheap, it doesn't last long, and service is poor. For me, sticking with one of the national companies is best. I may pay more for the plan, but it saves me in the long run by getting a better phone than some smaller carriers offer, or get it sooner, and I don't have to get trapped into major overage fees for roaming. Not to mention the better native network coverage to begin with.
    Aquila likes this.
    03-18-2013 09:42 PM
  11. palandri's Avatar
    Since I've seen what people pay overseas, I think the problem with U.S. Carriers is they know the mobile market is growing at a rapid pace and instead of playing free market economics, They're playing follow the leader. If they can get $50, we should be able to get $60. If they can get $60, we should be able to get $70. If they can get $70, we should be able to get $80. If they can get $80, we should be able to get $90. if they can limit data, we should too. Plus no rate discount if you purchase the phone outright.

    You can clearly see what the markup is when you look at MVNO's (mobile virtual network operator) Walmart selling unlimited talk & data on Straight Talk for $45 a month on the AT&T network.
    03-18-2013 11:14 PM
  12. Tall Mike 2145's Avatar
    A friend with an i[censored] got it unlocked and "switched" from AT&T to ST AT&T. The reason I mention this is that his data speeds have like doubled or tripled. SAME FREAKING NETWORK.
    03-19-2013 10:01 AM
37 12

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