10-30-2013 01:49 AM
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  1. Mooncatt's Avatar
    How about at LEAST a High School diploma? Is that really so much to ask?

    Signatures, shmignatures...
    Well that depends. An argument could also be made that you only need to be able to read and comprehend. Even without completing grade school, someone willing to research the candidates could still make an informed decision on who to vote for that fits their beliefs.
    10-22-2013 08:29 PM
  2. llamabreath's Avatar
    Well that depends. An argument could also be made that you only need to be able to read and comprehend. Even without completing grade school, someone willing to research the candidates could still make an informed decision on who to vote for that fits their beliefs.
    How many "informed decisions" do you think there were in the last couple of major elections? Percentage will be fine.

    Signatures, shmignatures...
    10-22-2013 08:34 PM
  3. JW4VZW's Avatar
    How much education should each citizen get in order to vote?
    The ability to comprehend what the various issues are, and each candidates' stance on the issues.
    10-22-2013 08:45 PM
  4. Scott7217's Avatar
    How about at LEAST a High School diploma? Is that really so much to ask?
    Are some high schools better than others? Is education consistent from one high school to the next? There may be a problem if students graduate with varying levels of knowledge.
    10-22-2013 08:47 PM
  5. Mooncatt's Avatar
    How many "informed decisions" do you think there were in the last couple of major elections? Percentage will be fine.

    Signatures, shmignatures...
    Regardless of the percentages, informed decisions don't necessarily equate brain smarts. On the flip side, there's an awful lot of smart but simply lazy people that don't want to research the candidates. (I agree being educated helps in making informed choices, just playing devil's advocate here. )
    10-22-2013 09:13 PM
  6. llamabreath's Avatar
    Regardless of the percentages, informed decisions don't necessarily equate brain smarts. On the flip side, there's an awful lot of smart but simply lazy people that don't want to research the candidates. (I agree being educated helps in making informed choices, just playing devil's advocate here. )
    I know (and i'm actually a professional Devil's Advocate). :evil:

    Signatures, shmignatures...
    10-22-2013 09:20 PM
  7. msndrstood's Avatar
    If you need a test to vote, then you need a test to buy a gun. Both guaranteed Constitutional rights, not to be infringed upon.



    Sent via The Big, Bad, Beautiful Note 3
    10-23-2013 12:30 AM
  8. Fairclough's Avatar
    Do you really want a flood of completely uneducated(politically) voters in the polls? It would become even more of a popularity contest than it is now. Campaigns would be won solely on flashy commercials and bashing of candidates. We are already alarmingly far down that path, lets not jump off the cliff at the end.

    Heck i would support a law that required you to pass a test of knowledge of the candidates and what their policies are before you can vote. That way only voters that understand the basic issues can have influence. I have no problem with people that have different opinions than myself voting. I have a huge problem with people that know nothing about the candidates or issues voting. It turns into a "well he has a nice smile" contest instead of an important decision about the direction the country will take for the next term.


    O and just to point out some Hypocrisy: 13$ to get an id to vote is unreasonable, but a 50$ fine for not voting at all is good idea...
    Actually teens get very into the debate, extremely. There is some misconceptions by fear tactics but before the legal age people already discuss who they will vote
    for. We watch the debates etc, there is a media blackout for the last week for all parties.

    I would say most voters are engaged those who aren't just do an invalid vote e.g draw on the ballot or fill it out wrong. The only issue there was people mistakes the liberal democrats for the liberals (main party) due to ballot positioning but that was a fee people.

    - Android Central App. Remember courage is contagious.
    msndrstood likes this.
    10-23-2013 06:48 AM
  9. Mooncatt's Avatar
    I would say most voters are engaged those who aren't just do an invalid vote e.g draw on the ballot or fill it out wrong.
    In the past I may have agreed, but not so anymore. At least not here, where we have the option not to vote (or vote none of the above by way of not voting). I can't tell you how many times I heard people saying they voted for Obama simply because they wanted to see a black President in the White House. People from all sides of the spectrum were doing that, so don't confuse me with saying it was just Democrats doing it. It was pretty sad seeing so many people that voted for someone simply because of race, their smile, charisma, and other nonsense characteristics for that position. Yeah, engaged my foot. Lol

    I'm sure that kind of voting has been going on for ages, but this was the first time people were so open about it (often quite proud of it too) with the media.
    10-23-2013 08:19 AM
  10. JW4VZW's Avatar
    I doubt this will change the opinion of anyone that thinks requiring an ID is the modern day equivalent of a poll tax, but something to read none the less. It points out several cases where voter ID laws were upheld when challenged as being poll taxes, right up to the supreme court.

    Holder Gets It Completely Wrong on Poll Taxes and Voter ID | The Foundry: Conservative Policy News Blog from The Heritage Foundation

    Probably the most notable part of the article is this bit from a federal district court in their ruling:



    Like it or not, the poll tax argument not only doesn't hold up in my opinion, but in the opinion of several courts as well.
    Hey, I am all for a voter ID. After all, I do need a photo ID to get a job, so what is the difference?
    10-23-2013 11:13 AM
  11. JW4VZW's Avatar
    I can't tell you how many times I heard people saying they voted for Obama simply because they wanted to see a black President in the White House. People from all sides of the spectrum were doing that, so don't confuse me with saying it was just Democrats doing it.
    To me, that is as racist as not voting for someone because of their skin color. People I used to work with when I was in the military would brag about the fact that they voted for him only because he was black. It would have been interesting to see how an election between obama and Herman Cain would have turned out.
    10-23-2013 11:16 AM
  12. Scott7217's Avatar
    To me, that is as racist as not voting for someone because of their skin color. People I used to work with when I was in the military would brag about the fact that they voted for him only because he was black.
    Is this a typical attitude for military personnel? Did Obama's performance as commander-in-chief ever come up?
    10-23-2013 03:49 PM
  13. Scott7217's Avatar
    It would have been interesting to see how an election between obama and Herman Cain would have turned out.
    It would be an interesting election. I suppose the fact that Obama is biracial would probably come up in conversation.

    Looking back, was Cain a better candidate than Romney?
    10-23-2013 03:54 PM
  14. Mooncatt's Avatar
    Looking back, was Cain a better candidate than Romney?
    Cain is a Fair Tax proponent and strong business man, so he had a lot going for him in my book. Had he been elected, I'm willing to bet we wouldn't be dealing with debt ceilings like we are now. So I'm thinking he was a better candidate.
    10-23-2013 04:03 PM
  15. cdmjlt369's Avatar
    Cain is a Fair Tax proponent and strong business man, so he had a lot going for him in my book. Had he been elected, I'm willing to bet we wouldn't be dealing with debt ceilings like we are now. So I'm thinking he was a better candidate.
    He would have had my vote against Obama or Romney either one

    Sent from a device that supports the proposed 28th amendment
    10-23-2013 04:31 PM
  16. Scott7217's Avatar
    Well that depends. An argument could also be made that you only need to be able to read and comprehend.
    I would agree. I'm thinking that if you're intelligent enough to serve on a jury in a court room, you're good enough to vote.
    10-23-2013 04:44 PM
  17. JW4VZW's Avatar
    Is this a typical attitude for military personnel? Did Obama's performance as commander-in-chief ever come up?
    I would say that it was not typical. I can't recall anything being said about his performance as the commander-in-chief.
    10-23-2013 04:47 PM
  18. JW4VZW's Avatar
    It would be an interesting election. I suppose the fact that Obama is biracial would probably come up in conversation.

    Looking back, was Cain a better candidate than Romney?
    I wouldn't say better, as each candidate had a different background. Cain was a business man, and that is what I liked.
    10-23-2013 04:48 PM
  19. Scott7217's Avatar
    I would say that it was not typical. I can't recall anything being said about his performance as the commander-in-chief.
    In which branch of the military did you see people bragging about their vote?

    If that behavior was not typical, then I'm not sure if it was a significant factor during the election, but only among the people you have met in the military. It's certainly possible elsewhere. We presume the Republicans would have taken this into consideration when planning their bid for the White House.
    10-23-2013 04:59 PM
  20. Scott7217's Avatar
    I wouldn't say better, as each candidate had a different background. Cain was a business man, and that is what I liked.
    Unfortunately, the Republicans could only field one candidate for president. Perhaps Cain should have run as an independent, but that probably would have split the conservative vote between Romney and Cain, clearing a way for an Obama win.

    In a tight election, you need a candidate that can bring votes in a battleground state. Perhaps the Republicans felt Cain couldn't do that, which is why they went with Romney. Financing was probably another factor. Cain probably couldn't raise as much money as Romney.
    10-23-2013 05:05 PM
  21. Mooncatt's Avatar
    It would be an interesting election. I suppose the fact that Obama is biracial would probably come up in conversation.
    Now imagine if Cain ran again and won the next election. You know there's going to be gloating that Republicans had the first truly black President.
    10-23-2013 05:59 PM
  22. mgindi26's Avatar
    If you are 70, don't drive, don't drink, you probably don't have that ID.

    If they handed them out free, made it so you can get them at a library or some where that has easy access, then maybe I wouldn't have an issue about it. But when you don't drive, and you have to travel 50 miles to pay $10-$30 to get one while you're on a fixed income...It becomes a poll tax.

    Sent via The Big, Bad, Beautiful Note 3
    If you don't have identification in this day and age then you are probably not participating in our society. To buy a home you need id to rent am apartment you need id to have a bank account you need id, to travel you need I'd, to get a job you need id, to cash a paycheck you need id, to get government assistance you need id, to attend college you need id I could go on of course. It is not complicated to get I'd. Now why is it that the same liberal mindset that objects to voter id laws because of the silly excuses you've given doesn't object to the intrusive questions, proof of identity, proof of income, the need to own a computer (much bigger expense than a driver's license) etc... necessary to register for obamacare. I think you've made a great argument that the obamacare law is like a poll tax. It fines you for not participating in it. Nobody forces you to vote we just want to make sure you do it only once per election. If you have no objections to obamacare then you can't object to voter id.
    Have a good day

    Sent from my VS980 4G using AC Forums mobile app
    cdmjlt369 likes this.
    10-23-2013 06:18 PM
  23. Scott7217's Avatar
    Now imagine if Cain ran again and won the next election. You know there's going to be gloating that Republicans had the first truly black President.
    I would like for Cain to run again. Colin Powell or Condoleezza Rice would also be good choices.
    10-23-2013 06:26 PM
  24. Mooncatt's Avatar
    I don't know if he will, but I have heard his name mentioned a time or two recently in the news, so he's still out there to keep an eye on.
    10-23-2013 06:35 PM
  25. llamabreath's Avatar
    I don't know if he will, but I have heard his name mentioned a time or two recently in the news, so he's still out there to keep an eye on.
    Cain has a daily radio talk show here in Atlanta that he did before he ran and came back to after he dropped out. He's still delivering his message, but I doubt he'll run again. He wouldn't want to put his wife through that muck again.

    Signatures, shmignatures...
    10-23-2013 06:42 PM
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