1. palandri's Avatar
    That's right, Walmart is hold a food drive for their employees, so they can enjoy Thanksgiving dinner. What's wrong with this picture?

    Walmart Store Holding Thanksgiving Charity Food Drive -- For Its Own Employees! - Forbes
    11-19-2013 01:24 PM
  2. Scott7217's Avatar
    That's right, Walmart is hold a food drive for their employees, so they can enjoy Thanksgiving dinner. What's wrong with this picture?

    Walmart Store Holding Thanksgiving Charity Food Drive -- For Its Own Employees! - Forbes
    It is sad to hear that. To be fair, though, the food drive is only in Canton, Ohio. I wonder if that location is having more problems than the rest of the country.
    palandri likes this.
    11-19-2013 04:51 PM
  3. palandri's Avatar
    It is sad to hear that. To be fair, though, the food drive is only in Canton, Ohio. I wonder if that location is having more problems than the rest of the country.
    I don't know and maybe other stores are doing it, who knows. I would think the Ohio store could write off and give their employees some Thanksgiving food that was close to being expired, like fresh, non-frozen turkey.
    11-19-2013 05:05 PM
  4. Mooncatt's Avatar
    I've become numb and tired to these stories, and I worked for Walmart for a time as well. To this day, I've yet to hear anyone say they aspire to make a career at Wal-Mart store. We need to keep in mind the skill level of the various store level jobs they have. Having worked several areas of the store, I can tell you it's not very high, with few exceptions. A cashier's services simply aren't worth a lot when they can be found a dime a dozen. Places like retail, grocery, fast food, etc. are entry level employers for people just entering the workforce or wanting a little extra money. To expect them to be paid above their market value is an insult to those of us that moved on and bettered ourselves.

    Not to mention when these places raise their prices to offset the higher wages, the ripple effect through the rest of the economy is everyone has to pay more. Including those employees that just got the raise and they are still going to at the bottom of the pay scale and considered poor.

    Don't get me wrong, I do have my issues with Walmart. Just when it comes to pay, people need to think about what the jobs entail, the volume of potential employees, and the quality of those hired before crying for them to have a "livable wage." And that's a nebulous idea deserving of its own topic right there.
    mrsmumbles and NoYankees44 like this.
    11-19-2013 05:37 PM
  5. tippmann15's Avatar
    IMHO the only thing wrong with this picture is that the govt has made improper decisions resulting in the standard of living cost increasing.


    Note 3 <Caesars>
    mrsmumbles likes this.
    11-19-2013 05:38 PM
  6. Scott7217's Avatar
    I've become numb and tired to these stories, and I worked for Walmart for a time as well.
    When you were working at Walmart, did you ever see a food drive for your fellow Walmart employees?

    I think Walmart holding a food drive is a fine idea. Lots of businesses do the same thing around the holidays, and there's nothing wrong with that. Perhaps it would have been a better idea for Walmart to collect food for a local food bank and simply direct employees in need to visit the food bank.
    mrsmumbles likes this.
    11-19-2013 05:51 PM
  7. palandri's Avatar
    I've become numb and tired to these stories, and I worked for Walmart for a time as well. To this day, I've yet to hear anyone say they aspire to make a career at Wal-Mart store. We need to keep in mind the skill level of the various store level jobs they have. Having worked several areas of the store, I can tell you it's not very high, with few exceptions. A cashier's services simply aren't worth a lot when they can be found a dime a dozen. Places like retail, grocery, fast food, etc. are entry level employers for people just entering the workforce or wanting a little extra money. To expect them to be paid above their market value is an insult to those of us that moved on and bettered ourselves.

    Not to mention when these places raise their prices to offset the higher wages, the ripple effect through the rest of the economy is everyone has to pay more. Including those employees that just got the raise and they are still going to at the bottom of the pay scale and considered poor.

    Don't get me wrong, I do have my issues with Walmart. Just when it comes to pay, people need to think about what the jobs entail, the volume of potential employees, and the quality of those hired before crying for them to have a "livable wage." And that's a nebulous idea deserving of its own topic right there.
    I'd buy your argument if Costco had higher prices, but they don't. Check this out: Worker wages: Wendy's vs. Wal-Mart vs. Costco - Aug. 6, 2013
    11-19-2013 05:56 PM
  8. palandri's Avatar
    When you were working at Walmart, did you ever see a food drive for your fellow Walmart employees?

    I think Walmart holding a food drive is a fine idea. Lots of businesses do the same thing around the holidays, and there's nothing wrong with that. Perhaps it would have been a better idea for Walmart to collect food for a local food bank and simply direct employees in need to visit the food bank.
    Costco has the same prices. Read this: Worker wages: Wendy's vs. Wal-Mart vs. Costco - Aug. 6, 2013
    11-19-2013 05:57 PM
  9. Mooncatt's Avatar
    When you were working at Walmart, did you ever see a food drive for your fellow Walmart employees?

    I think Walmart holding a food drive is a fine idea. Lots of businesses do the same thing around the holidays, and there's nothing wrong with that. Perhaps it would have been a better idea for Walmart to collect food for a local food bank and simply direct employees in need to visit the food bank.
    I worked in 4 different stores around the country, ending over 8 years ago. During my years there, the closest thing I ever saw to something like this was one store with a "sunshine fund." That was an ongoing monetary donation fund for employees in emergency situations. I.e. a home fire, major sickness, accident, etc. I don't have a problem with in house stuff like this per se, but media outlets always love to use Walmart as a punching bag.

    I also worked several fundraisers they did for local charities and foods banks that usually brought in a fair amount.
    11-19-2013 06:06 PM
  10. benhmadison's Avatar
    I've become numb and tired to these stories, and I worked for Walmart for a time as well. To this day, I've yet to hear anyone say they aspire to make a career at Wal-Mart store. We need to keep in mind the skill level of the various store level jobs they have. Having worked several areas of the store, I can tell you it's not very high, with few exceptions. A cashier's services simply aren't worth a lot when they can be found a dime a dozen. Places like retail, grocery, fast food, etc. are entry level employers for people just entering the workforce or wanting a little extra money. To expect them to be paid above their market value is an insult to those of us that moved on and bettered ourselves.

    Not to mention when these places raise their prices to offset the higher wages, the ripple effect through the rest of the economy is everyone has to pay more. Including those employees that just got the raise and they are still going to at the bottom of the pay scale and considered poor.

    Don't get me wrong, I do have my issues with Walmart. Just when it comes to pay, people need to think about what the jobs entail, the volume of potential employees, and the quality of those hired before crying for them to have a "livable wage." And that's a nebulous idea deserving of its own topic right there.
    Anyone that is not repulsed by this has something seriously wrong with their thought process. These jobs are not entry level jobs or jobs to make extra money. These jobs are these people's livelihood and to pay them 7-9 bucks an hour is despicable end of story. People just learn to accept that while 6 members of the Walton family own more wealth than the bottom 30 percent of the US combined, it's perfectly acceptable to pay the workers wages that they can't possibly live on. We will just send them to a food bank or refer them to public assistance that way we make more and the taxpayers can support our employees. American capitalism used to mean something special. It meant if you worked hard you would be rewarded with opportunity. You could work for a company and be valued. You knew if you worked hard for them, they would take care of you. Those days are over. Such a shame what we've become as a nation.

    Sent from my Nexus 5
    Scott7217 likes this.
    11-19-2013 06:44 PM
  11. Mooncatt's Avatar
    I'd buy your argument if Costco had higher prices, but they don't. Check this out: Worker wages: Wendy's vs. Wal-Mart vs. Costco - Aug. 6, 2013
    Different business models. Not only does Costco require membership dues, but they don't have as extensive advertising expenses as Walmart, and sell in bulk. The article should have compared more to Sam's Club than Walmart. I can't speak for the stores, but the Costco distribution centers have a reputation as being some of the worst places to deliver in the trucking industry because of horrendous wait times to get unloaded. (Not that Walmart or any other grocery DC is much better.)

    I do agree that paying better can make for more productive employees, as well as having more of them to increase customer satisfaction. On the flip side, going the other way may also increase profits... To a point. Just a guess, but I've seen Walmart's tendencies to be strict on keeping wage costs down to increase profits, and I'm wondering if they are just trying to push the limit. Hours are being cut to the point that shelves aren't being stocked properly, and the ever popular long lines at the registers, and lack of help available on that sales floor. My hope is they start seeing how it's affecting customer satisfaction and sales.

    Then again, while I work for an outside carrier, I'm on a dedicated Walmart account and we've been staying pretty busy and have new stores popping up all over. So from a viability standpoint, they must be doing something right.
    11-19-2013 06:46 PM
  12. Mooncatt's Avatar
    Anyone that is not repulsed by this has something seriously wrong with their thought process. These jobs are not entry level jobs or jobs to make extra money. These jobs are these people's livelihood and to pay them 7-9 bucks an hour is despicable end of story.
    Since when has working a low level and, yes, entry level job been a career path? What can you point to that makes it skilled labor when literally anyone can do it? Just look at the self checkouts where untrained non-employees can actually run a register. How about instead of the workers complaining about wages, they work to better themselves and get more gainful employment, and make room for people new to the labor market that need to learn basic job skills.
    11-19-2013 07:03 PM
  13. Timelessblur's Avatar
    It is sad to hear that. To be fair, though, the food drive is only in Canton, Ohio. I wonder if that location is having more problems than the rest of the country.
    safe to say if they were any other planned that Walmart main office killed it really quickly and sent a strong warning to any store manager that it happens at.
    11-19-2013 10:04 PM
  14. Timelessblur's Avatar
    Different business models. Not only does Costco require membership dues, but they don't have as extensive advertising expenses as Walmart, and sell in bulk. The article should have compared more to Sam's Club than Walmart. I can't speak for the stores, but the Costco distribution centers have a reputation as being some of the worst places to deliver in the trucking industry because of horrendous wait times to get unloaded. (Not that Walmart or any other grocery DC is much better.)

    I do agree that paying better can make for more productive employees, as well as having more of them to increase customer satisfaction. On the flip side, going the other way may also increase profits... To a point. Just a guess, but I've seen Walmart's tendencies to be strict on keeping wage costs down to increase profits, and I'm wondering if they are just trying to push the limit. Hours are being cut to the point that shelves aren't being stocked properly, and the ever popular long lines at the registers, and lack of help available on that sales floor. My hope is they start seeing how it's affecting customer satisfaction and sales.

    Then again, while I work for an outside carrier, I'm on a dedicated Walmart account and we've been staying pretty busy and have new stores popping up all over. So from a viability standpoint, they must be doing something right.
    I would say costco vs Walmart is fair. Guess who owns sams club. I am willing to bet good money that Sam's clubs wages are pretty much dead even with Walmart.
    11-19-2013 10:07 PM
  15. benhmadison's Avatar
    Since when has working a low level and, yes, entry level job been a career path? What can you point to that makes it skilled labor when literally anyone can do it? Just look at the self checkouts where untrained non-employees can actually run a register. How about instead of the workers complaining about wages, they work to better themselves and get more gainful employment, and make room for people new to the labor market that need to learn basic job skills.
    Because it's not 1970 anymore. There are very few decent jobs left. Everyone has a college degree because they were told it would be necessary to get a good job, so now the labor market is flooded with college educated baristas at Starbucks, or shelve stockers at Walmart.

    If minimum wage had kept up with inflation since the 70's it would be over 21 dollars an hour in 2013. Products and services would be the same price we pay today. The only difference is, the workers would have actually had a larger share of the revenue.

    It's not as simple as "just get a better job". It's easy for people than have been successful, or who may be older to say that but there is a lot more to it than that.

    When you are on your feet all day, busting your *** for garbage wages, then facing the stress of paying bills or feeding your children, it's hard to improve yourself.

    I don't know why people have such disdain for the workers who make it possible for the rich to get richer. The workers ask for more money just so they can actually support themselves and they are shot down.

    Sent from my Nexus 5
    msndrstood likes this.
    11-19-2013 10:16 PM
  16. Timelessblur's Avatar
    Because it's not 1970 anymore. There are very few decent jobs left. Everyone has a college degree because they were told it would be necessary to get a good job, so now the labor market is flooded with college educated baristas at Starbucks, or shelve stockers at Walmart.

    If minimum wage had kept up with inflation since the 70's it would be over 21 dollars an hour in 2013. Products and services would be the same price we pay today. The only difference is, the workers would have actually had a larger share of the revenue.

    It's not as simple as "just get a better job". It's easy for people than have been successful, or who may be older to say that but there is a lot more to it than that.

    When you are on your feet all day, busting your *** for garbage wages, then facing the stress of paying bills or feeding your children, it's hard to improve yourself.

    I don't know why people have such disdain for the workers who make it possible for the rich to get richer. The workers ask for more money just so they can actually support themselves and they are shot down.

    Sent from my Nexus 5

    Youu have your numbers wrong
    It would be $21.72 if minimum wage has kept up with worker productivity. It would be $10.74 if it kept up with inflation.


    It is sad as it is only people at the very tip top that has had much of the increase money from productivity.
    11-19-2013 10:39 PM
  17. Mooncatt's Avatar
    I would say costco vs Walmart is fair. Guess who owns sams club. I am willing to bet good money that Sam's clubs wages are pretty much dead even with Walmart.
    Yes, Walmart owns Sam's Club, but they are ran with two different business models and it's almost like it is two different companies. That's why I said that article should have compared clubs, not to Walmart. In my business interactions with both Walmart and Sam's, they are usually upbeat but the Sam's employees are usually quicker on the ball. When shopping as a customer, the Sam's employees are usually more friendly. It was actually as bit of a shock the level of service I got when getting my membership and then shopping. I don't know about wage comparisons, but sounds like comparing them to Costco would be an interesting news article.


    Because it's not 1970 anymore. There are very few decent jobs left. Everyone has a college degree because they were told it would be necessary to get a good job, so now the labor market is flooded with college educated baristas at Starbucks, or shelve stockers at Walmart.
    Not everyone is worthy of a college degree, and many have degrees that aren't marketable in the real world. Having a degree in anything doesn't somehow make a job as a cashier any more valuable unless maybe it's a business degree and you're aiming for upper management.

    If minimum wage had kept up with inflation since the 70's it would be over 21 dollars an hour in 2013. Products and services would be the same price we pay today. The only difference is, the workers would have actually had a larger share of the revenue.
    Please explain how you think that is possible. I already addressed the low wage issue in my first post. Raising it would still keep them in the same place they are now. Prices won't stay the same.
    11-19-2013 11:14 PM
  18. Aquila's Avatar
    Please explain how you think that is possible. I already addressed the low wage issue in my first post. Raising it would still keep them in the same place they are now. Prices won't stay the same.
    Wal-Mart Stores Inc. (WMT) | Profitability This isn't all doom and gloom. It has a high chance of breaking even for Walmart and a small chance of either costing them (and then us) slightly, or being a net gain for Walmart.

    That's the scaling thing addressed in another thread. If total labor (salary, wages, etc) is 8-15% of Revenue is employee wages and benefits, and say 50% are minimum wage, we're talking $18 to $35 billion dollars is going out towards labor/benefits for minimum wage employees. Walmart has some pretty huge turnover (60-70%) so we'll take the higher number. $35 billion out of their $466 billion in revenue is obviously 7.5% (50% of the 15% we're using).

    If we tripled the minimum wage, we'd be adding $70 billion to their expenses, effectively turning that 7.5% into 22.5% of revenue, adding 15%. So the first point is that we are not tripling their total expense, only adding 15% to it. Walmart with expenses of about $352 billion, had a gross margin of 24.5% Obviously, adding 15% of revenue to the expenses would lower that margin to 9.5%, leaving them only $44.3 billion in profit, rather than $114.2 billion. Still a great year, but that hurts. That's reducing profit by 60% to triple the wages of half the employee. No risk of showing a loss.

    However, no one is really asking to triple, it, but rather to raise it slightly to $10 or, in some bills, to double it. Doubling it is only $35 billion to Walmart's expenses, leaving them with $80 billion in profit, much more respectable. Now two things happen. One, the costs of goods and services that Walmart purchases go up slightly, because smaller companies cannot absorb it as easily as a giant like Walmart. Two, revenue goes up because those employees can now afford to buy things, like food and clothing, etc. Both of those work to offset each other and have negligible impact on the GPM at the end of the day.

    Assuming that Walmart passes the $35 billion on to consumers entirely, rather than suffering the hit to their margin, we should expect the price of goods to increase by 5.0 to 7.5% in order to double the minimum wage... until we realize that Walmart is in a lowest cost gets the cookie business, in which case they may share some of the pain with their consumers in order to maintain and grow the customer base.

    All that completed, a huge portion of the population that requires State and Federal assistance, despite being employed, will no longer require those benefits. Those benefits sum to nearly 15% of the Gross wages of a median income earner. If they're halved, the consumer breaks even. Taxes can go down, or stay inflated and work towards eradicating the deficit. Either way, long term the ROI is very positive for us as consumers.

    Walmart is a great example for this, because their labor costs are insane compared to most companies (effectively double what they ought to be). Lowering turnover will also help their profitability. While increasing wages and benefits doesn't guarantee associate retention, they don't hurt your chances and things like employee growth programs, tuition reimbursement, etc are very cheap ways to grow the skills of your employees while keeping them engaged in the workplace and enthusiastic about being on your team.

    If you have ever run a business, you know there are several approaches to the labor model, and often times the one that has the most "savings" in the short term, is the most expensive long term. Turnover drives much more expense than wages do in just about every business. Every person you hire costs thousands of dollars to on-board. A new driver costs us about $15,000 before they start producing revenue, but luckily they produce a LOT of revenue. A Walmart associate produces nearly no revenue by executing their tasks, but probably costs $8,000-10,000 to get up to speed, and after that it's more or less keeping a spot on the floor warm. With a total salary of $15,000-$20,000 a Walmart employee takes a long time to hit "break even", and a rolling turnover of over 70% means that their average tenure doesn't currently allow for breaking even. That makes them try to save money short term, because there IS NO long term for most employees. This approach is short sighted and is costing them far more than it would to have a more compelling partnership with their labor force.
    benhmadison and Scott7217 like this.
    11-20-2013 04:03 AM
  19. palandri's Avatar
    It's a great movie, but you'll need some time to watch it. It's 1.5 hours

    11-20-2013 06:56 AM
  20. Mooncatt's Avatar
    If increasing the wages of these low paying businesses is so good, then one would expect any time the minimum wage was increased, those people getting the raise would now be well off. That never happens as the markets all fluctuate and everyone pretty much stays right where they were before the increase. Businesses typically won't absorb those increased labor costs long term. Large and small, they all too often either cut staff hours and reduce hiring lieu of raising prices as much as needed to fully offset the labor costs, but prices will go up eventually as their other costs will have gone up too.
    11-20-2013 10:05 AM
  21. palandri's Avatar
    If increasing the wages of these low paying businesses is so good, then one would expect any time the minimum wage was increased, those people getting the raise would now be well off. That never happens as the markets all fluctuate and everyone pretty much stays right where they were before the increase. Businesses typically won't absorb those increased labor costs long term. Large and small, they all too often either cut staff hours and reduce hiring lieu of raising prices as much as needed to fully offset the labor costs, but prices will go up eventually as their other costs will have gone up too.
    So we continue to pay for section 8 so Walmart can operate. Is that the American dream? Did you see the wage comparison above between Walmart & Costco?

    How McDonald's and Wal-Mart Became Welfare Queens - Bloomberg

    You Pay Walmart's Workers as Company Keeps Its Money

    http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-me...ees-medicaid-/
    11-20-2013 11:37 AM
  22. Mooncatt's Avatar
    So we continue to pay for section 8 so Walmart can operate. Is that the American dream? Did you see the wage comparison above between Walmart & Costco?
    Point 1: If all you have is low Walmart wages, then you need to be making better lifestyle choices. Like not starting a family and then ask for government help. That's more a cultural issue if you ask me.

    Point 2: Already addressed that twice.
    11-20-2013 12:04 PM
  23. palandri's Avatar
    Point 1: If all you have is low Walmart wages, then you need to be making better lifestyle choices. Like not starting a family and then ask for government help. That's more a cultural issue if you ask me.

    Point 2: Already addressed that twice.
    Take a look at that video I posted and look at what Walmart does to small businesses. They destroy small businesses and they don't care. My mother-in-law use to live in a small northern Minnesota town where small businesses thrived. Then a Super Walmart came to town, and all the small businessses in her town and the other small towns within a 20 miles radius turned into ghost towns. The VFW bar and the small engine repair shop survived, only because Walmart doesn't have a bar or a small engine repair shop. My brother-in-law was working at the local Super Value grocery store before it closed and making $18 an hour + benefits. All he was offered at Walmart was a minimum wage wage job.

    Walmart and Sam's Club are the same animal. You can find the same goods, TV's, clothes, DVD's Office supplies and food at either, only Sam's club sells in bulk. Their wages are the same as the Walmart store. My neighbor had a weekend part-time job at the Sams Club by me. Comparing Costco to Walmart is no different than comparing it to Sam's Club.
    benhmadison likes this.
    11-20-2013 12:36 PM
  24. Live2ride883's Avatar
    How is this any different than what other employers do to help out a family of an employee in need. As an example the factory I used to work at ALWAYS passed the hat when there was a death in the family, fire, unexpected medical expenses (one worker was diagnosed with cancer and the company gave 10k to cover medical expenses). Also every Thanksgiving and Christmas each employee was given a 25.00 Kroger gift card.
    11-20-2013 02:18 PM
  25. Aquila's Avatar
    If increasing the wages of these low paying businesses is so good, then one would expect any time the minimum wage was increased, those people getting the raise would now be well off. That never happens as the markets all fluctuate and everyone pretty much stays right where they were before the increase. Businesses typically won't absorb those increased labor costs long term. Large and small, they all too often either cut staff hours and reduce hiring lieu of raising prices as much as needed to fully offset the labor costs, but prices will go up eventually as their other costs will have gone up too.
    A lot of businesses do exactly that, either because they don't understand or want to participate in the investment or because they can't afford the risk in the short term. A tiny business can't have numbers all over the place, the profits pay the mortgage. Walmart, McDonald's, etc have the cash flows and analytic resources to figure this out, survive it and thrive. A small business could be severely affected and THAT is a totally separate set of data and results.

    XT1060. Through spacetime.
    11-20-2013 03:55 PM

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