06-30-2015 05:00 PM
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  1. Timelessblur's Avatar
    56% of those put to death since 1976 are white, 35% black, and 7% latino. Were's the racial bias?
    And compare that to the population break down?

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
    05-17-2014 02:33 PM
  2. anon8126715's Avatar
    And compare that to the population break down?

    Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
    Maybe he needs this stat?

    DNA Exonerations Nationwide
    [Print Version]

    There have been 316 post-conviction DNA exonerations in the United States.

    • The first DNA exoneration took place in 1989. Exonerations have been won in 36 states; since 2000, there have been 249 exonerations.

    • 18 of the 316 people exonerated through DNA served time on death row. Another 16 were charged with capital crimes but not sentenced to death.

    • The average length of time served by exonerees is 13.5 years. The total number of years served is approximately 4,232.

    • The average age of exonerees at the time of their wrongful convictions was 27.

    Races of the 316 exonerees:

    198 African Americans
    94 Caucasians
    22 Latinos
    2 Asian American
    palandri likes this.
    05-17-2014 07:29 PM
  3. Martin Disch's Avatar
    How long did it take for the woman he buried alive to die? Was she given an ounce of sedative before getting stuck 6ft under?
    I'm so glad I get to live in a place where we don't do revenge justice.

    Posted via Android Central App
    05-19-2014 04:38 AM
  4. palandri's Avatar
    I'm so glad I get to live in a place where we don't do revenge justice.

    Posted via Android Central App
    We'll get there someday, but it will be a long and painful process.
    05-19-2014 07:05 AM
  5. SteveISU's Avatar
    Sorry, but nothing is being killed if it hasn't been born. Comparing a women's right to her own healthcare choices to a serial ******...didn't expect anything less!

    Sent from my SCH-I535 using AC Forums mobile app
    It is not uncommon for a person who murders a pregnant woman to be charged with two counts of homicide. The argument to the jury that it's "just a thing" in there is pretty much a non-starter in those cases.
    05-19-2014 12:29 PM
  6. Scott7217's Avatar
    I've always found it interesting that the political party that claims to value life is always so eager to use the death penalty.
    There are people who oppose both capital punishment and abortion. Likewise, there are people who are both pro-choice and pro-death penalty.
    05-20-2014 05:05 PM
  7. Scott7217's Avatar
    I find it interesting the party who condones killing an innocent baby would rather stand up for the protection of a murderer or a sexual predator. God forbid someone who rapes an 11yr old feels a twinge of pain upon his execution.
    Oklahoma is allowed to review its execution procedures, just like any other state. I expect that Oklahoma will simply revise the protocol, and Charles Warner will die by lethal injection for the crime of killing a girl who was less than 1 year old at the time of her death.
    05-20-2014 05:15 PM
  8. SteveISU's Avatar
    Oklahoma is allowed to review its execution procedures, just like any other state. I expect that Oklahoma will simply revise the protocol, and Charles Warner will die by lethal injection for the crime of killing a girl who was less than 1 year old at the time of her death.
    Or they can follow Tennessee and reinstate the electric chair.
    05-27-2014 01:04 PM
  9. Scott7217's Avatar
    Or they can follow Tennessee and reinstate the electric chair.
    Oklahoma can certainly bring back the electric chair. I don't see anything preventing them from doing that.

    The irony is that most of the issues with lethal injection were a result of the actions from European drug companies. They refused to supply American prisons with the drugs because they didn't believe in capital punishment. So now executions in America are being carried out with methods that some people believe are more painful and cruel. It's an example of consequences that I don't think the Europeans intended.
    05-29-2014 11:19 AM
  10. jdbii's Avatar
    Oklahoma can certainly bring back the electric chair. I don't see anything preventing them from doing that.

    The irony is that most of the issues with lethal injection were a result of the actions from European drug companies. They refused to supply American prisons with the drugs because they didn't believe in capital punishment. So now executions in America are being carried out with methods that some people believe are more painful and cruel. It's an example of consequences that I don't think the Europeans intended.
    Are you suggesting the Europeans therefore bear some of the responsibility for the use of the electrical chair in the US, or are you just pointing out the simple irony that a well intended action can have unforeseen negative consequences?
    05-29-2014 07:01 PM
  11. anon8126715's Avatar
    Are you suggesting the Europeans therefore bear some of the responsibility for the use of the electrical chair in the US, or are you just pointing out the simple irony that a well intended action can have unforeseen negative consequences?
    I think he means the Europeans' actions against capital punishment is having the wrong effect. I can't help wonder though (I'm skeptical by nature), if the financial benefits were high enough, would they trump the drug company's morality? You have to figure the amount of executions (even though they're higher than they should be) we perform a year can't be that much revenue to large drug companies.
    jdbii and Scott7217 like this.
    05-29-2014 08:15 PM
  12. Scott7217's Avatar
    Are you suggesting the Europeans therefore bear some of the responsibility for the use of the electrical chair in the US, or are you just pointing out the simple irony that a well intended action can have unforeseen negative consequences?
    I was simply pointing out the irony. If I had to guess, I think the European drug companies believed Oklahoma would halt all its executions because the required drugs were not available. In spite of that, Oklahoma proceeded, and the last execution did not go as planned, which is why the drug protocol is under review.

    Of course, there are some people who believe criminals should suffer greatly for their crimes, so they are probably thanking the Europeans for their refusal.
    jdbii likes this.
    05-29-2014 10:30 PM
  13. anon8126715's Avatar
    One thing I hear from the pro death penalty people is how it "saves tax payers". I've heard that it's actually more expensive to send someone to death, what with all the appeals processes that take place.

    http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/costs-death-penalty

    I'm actually torn on the topic. The biggest reason I am against it is because there are so many wrongful convictions. Sentencing an innocent person to death, even if it's just one or two out of thousands, to me that's not justified. But on the other hand, once a person has decided that they have no respect for life, especially if they extinguish someone else's life in a horrific manner, how can families and loved ones of the victims realize any justice? Although, I've heard families of the victims that have been in the room during an execution, they say that they came out of the experience not wanting that fate for anyone.
    05-30-2014 09:55 AM
  14. palandri's Avatar
    One thing I hear from the pro death penalty people is how it "saves tax payers". I've heard that it's actually more expensive to send someone to death, what with all the appeals processes that take place.

    Costs of the Death Penalty | Death Penalty Information Center

    I'm actually torn on the topic. The biggest reason I am against it is because there are so many wrongful convictions. Sentencing an innocent person to death, even if it's just one or two out of thousands, to me that's not justified. But on the other hand, once a person has decided that they have no respect for life, especially if they extinguish someone else's life in a horrific manner, how can families and loved ones of the victims realize any justice? Although, I've heard families of the victims that have been in the room during an execution, they say that they came out of the experience not wanting that fate for anyone.
    A couple of things

    I've read several studies that shows how expensive it is to execute someone, but when you look at actual correction cost overall, it's a drop in the bucket. It's like less than 2 cents out of every tax dollar goes to corrections, plus saving money is far from a valid reason to execute people.

    There was a recent study done on executions in the U.S. by an international group (I can't remember the name of the group, you can probably google it and find it) that had wrongful executions in the U.S. at 4%. That 4 out of every 100 executions. That's really high. We stopped executions in Illinois due to how many people on death row in Illinois were later found innocent by DNA testing.

    I am not one that goes out to rallies or protest against the death penalty, but I am against it after reviewing all the facts.
    jdbii likes this.
    05-30-2014 11:15 AM
  15. anon8126715's Avatar
    A couple of things

    I've read several studies that shows how expensive it is to execute someone, but when you look at actual correction cost overall, it's a drop in the bucket. It's like less than 2 cents out of every tax dollar goes to corrections, plus saving money is far from a valid reason to execute people.

    There was a recent study done on executions in the U.S. by an international group (I can't remember the name of the group, you can probably google it and find it) that had wrongful executions in the U.S. at 4%. That 4 out of every 100 executions. That's really high. We stopped executions in Illinois due to how many people on death row in Illinois were later found innocent by DNA testing.

    I am not one that goes out to rallies or protest against the death penalty, but I am against it after reviewing all the facts.
    I agree that monetary loss shouldn't come into play, but that's one thing I hear from the pro-death penalty crowd as a way to justify them wanting to impose the death penalty.

    Although, when someone does commit an especially horrific crime, it's difficult to say that we're just going to shelter, feed, and clothe them for the rest of their lives. It can also be argued that a life sentence is also immoral. It's definitely a decision that I'm glad I don't have to make.
    05-30-2014 11:58 AM
  16. Scott7217's Avatar
    I can't help wonder though (I'm skeptical by nature), if the financial benefits were high enough, would they trump the drug company's morality?
    I believe that European drug companies would view any financial benefits as "blood money" because the sale of their product to a US prison will result in another person's death. Remember, these companies are primarily involved in health care, not criminal justice. So I don't think their opposition to capital punishment will change, no matter how much money is involved.
    05-30-2014 05:30 PM
  17. vinnie_boombhats's Avatar
    I believe strongly in revenge. You can bet your bottom dollar, if you kill someone I care about, I will do everything in my power to ensure you meet a most gruesome fate!
    05-30-2014 05:57 PM
  18. anon8126715's Avatar
    I believe strongly in revenge. You can bet your bottom dollar, if you kill someone I care about, I will do everything in my power to ensure you meet a most gruesome fate!
    That's the sentiment a lot of victims' loved ones say initially. But then after the person found guilty is put to death, a lot of those people (especially the ones that go to the execution) say that the closure they thought they'd have wasn't there. Their loved one is still gone, but now they're poisoned with images of a person being executed.
    05-31-2014 07:13 AM
  19. Aquila's Avatar
    That's the sentiment a lot of victims' loved ones say initially. But then after the person found guilty is put to death, a lot of those people (especially the ones that go to the execution) say that the closure they thought they'd have wasn't there. Their loved one is still gone, but now they're poisoned with images of a person being executed.
    That and its approximately the opposite of the concept of justice upon which the code is written.

    Nexus through spacetime
    05-31-2014 10:36 AM
  20. anon8126715's Avatar
    That and its approximately the opposite of the concept of justice upon which the code is written.

    Nexus through spacetime
    Some people get justice and revenge mixed up. While I think both have similar components, they are distinctly different.
    06-01-2014 10:07 AM
  21. Scott7217's Avatar
    That's the sentiment a lot of victims' loved ones say initially. But then after the person found guilty is put to death, a lot of those people (especially the ones that go to the execution) say that the closure they thought they'd have wasn't there. Their loved one is still gone, but now they're poisoned with images of a person being executed.
    I would be curious to know if the family members of the victim change their view on the death penalty after watching the execution of the murderer of their loved one. Do they then become opponents of capital punishment, or do they support it even more?

    Also, are family members of the victim forced to witness the execution, or can they opt out of it?
    06-02-2014 02:22 PM
  22. palandri's Avatar
    Oklahoma can certainly bring back the electric chair. I don't see anything preventing them from doing that.....
    Didn't they stop using the electric chair because someones brain boiled and his head blew up? I think I remember reading that.
    06-02-2014 03:05 PM
  23. Scott7217's Avatar
    Didn't they stop using the electric chair because someones brain boiled and his head blew up? I think I remember reading that.
    I have heard of instances where there were complications during the execution process with the electric chair. It's probably why most states switched to lethal injection as their preferred method.

    We would have had more executions with lethal injection if there wasn't a drug supply issue.
    06-02-2014 03:21 PM
  24. palandri's Avatar
    I have heard of instances where there were complications during the execution process with the electric chair. It's probably why most states switched to lethal injection as their preferred method.

    We would have had more executions with lethal injection if there wasn't a drug supply issue.
    I am not an attorney, but there maybe a liability issue for the drug companies. If they are supplying the drugs to execute someone and that person is later exonerated through DNA or a confession. Also, someone from the family of the person executed goes nuts and goes after employees of the drug company, so is it worth it for the drug company to make a few bucks by selling those drugs?
    06-02-2014 03:28 PM
  25. Scott7217's Avatar
    I am not an attorney, but there maybe a liability issue for the drug companies. If they are supplying the drugs to execute someone and that person is later exonerated through DNA or a confession. Also, someone from the family of the person executed goes nuts and goes after employees of the drug company, so is it worth it for the drug company to make a few bucks by selling those drugs?
    If the state executes an innocent person, we would probably assign blame to the police investigating the crime, the lab analyzing the evidence, and the prosecution presenting the case.

    Drug company employees are accustomed to attacks. For example, there are radical groups that oppose experimentation on animals, so they will target facilities that test drugs on animals.
    06-02-2014 04:06 PM
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