06-30-2015 05:00 PM
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  1. jdbii's Avatar
    I am not an attorney, but there maybe a liability issue for the drug companies. If they are supplying the drugs to execute someone and that person is later exonerated through DNA or a confession. Also, someone from the family of the person executed goes nuts and goes after employees of the drug company, so is it worth it for the drug company to make a few bucks by selling those drugs?
    I don't think there could be any liability for the drug company. I wouldn't see the distinction/difference in liability between a drug company in the case of lethal injection, or a munitions company in the case of firing squad.

    I think it is a cocktail of drugs and that's part of the problem. The secret concoction, and the differences in drug protocols, makes it prone to mistakes and susceptible to supply problems. I'm just guessing here, but veterinarians likely have the benefit of using a drug that is specifically designed to euthanize animals whereas humans don't have that option for ethical and legal reasons. Pharmaceuticals probably don't produce poison and for some reason prisons won't just give an overdose of morphine.
    06-02-2014 04:55 PM
  2. anon8126715's Avatar
    I would be curious to know if the family members of the victim change their view on the death penalty after watching the execution of the murderer of their loved one. Do they then become opponents of capital punishment, or do they support it even more?

    Also, are family members of the victim forced to witness the execution, or can they opt out of it?
    I've heard of one or two cases where the loved one became an opponent of capital punishment after watching an execution. They said it doesn't bring them closure (their loved one is still gone), and the horror of seeing someone killed in front of them is overwhelming.
    06-03-2014 01:35 AM
  3. Scott7217's Avatar
    I think it is a cocktail of drugs and that's part of the problem. The secret concoction, and the differences in drug protocols, makes it prone to mistakes and susceptible to supply problems. I'm just guessing here, but veterinarians likely have the benefit of using a drug that is specifically designed to euthanize animals whereas humans don't have that option for ethical and legal reasons. Pharmaceuticals probably don't produce poison and for some reason prisons won't just give an overdose of morphine.
    From what I've read, veterinarians use sodium thiopental and pentobarbital. Prisons used to use those drugs as well, but drug companies stopped selling them to prisons because they didn't want to be associated with capital punishment.

    As for pharmaceutical companies making poisons, any drug can be a poison at a sufficient dose.

    Ohio executed Dennis McGuire using a drug combination that included hydromorphone, which is related to morphine. Prisons are constantly reviewing and revising their protocols for the lethal injection process. Maybe they will switch to morphine in the future.
    jdbii likes this.
    06-03-2014 03:55 PM
  4. Scott7217's Avatar
    I've heard of one or two cases where the loved one became an opponent of capital punishment after watching an execution. They said it doesn't bring them closure (their loved one is still gone), and the horror of seeing someone killed in front of them is overwhelming.
    Well, if the families of the victims were forced to witness executions, you may end up with a lot more people opposed to capital punishment. Over time, you may end up with enough public support to ban the death penalty completely in the United States.

    I believe this is why supporters of the death penalty want to remove the appearance of suffering during an execution. If the death itself looks too brutal, you will have more people switching to the opposite side of the debate.
    jdbii likes this.
    06-03-2014 04:22 PM
  5. jdbii's Avatar
    Prisons used to use those drugs as well, but drug companies stopped selling them to prisons because they didn't want to be associated with capital punishment.
    Then maybe it was a liability issue.

    As for pharmaceutical companies making poisons, any drug can be a poison at a sufficient dose.
    Good point. Even aspirin kills.

    Maybe they will switch to morphine in the future.
    I doubt it. It'd be too pleasant for the condemned.
    06-03-2014 07:08 PM
  6. anon8126715's Avatar
    Well, if the families of the victims were forced to witness executions, you may end up with a lot more people opposed to capital punishment. Over time, you may end up with enough public support to ban the death penalty completely in the United States.

    I believe this is why supporters of the death penalty want to remove the appearance of suffering during an execution. If the death itself looks too brutal, you will have more people switching to the opposite side of the debate.
    I don't think they were forced to watch the executions, but they thought that seeing their loved one's murderer die would somehow square things. It actually didn't, and instead of being proponents of the death penalty, they became advocates against it.
    06-03-2014 10:04 PM
  7. Scott7217's Avatar
    Then maybe it was a liability issue.
    If liability was a big issue, perhaps the government could grant immunity to the drug companies. This way the prisons would have the drugs they need to carry out an execution, and the drug companies would not have to worry about lawsuits.
    06-03-2014 10:37 PM
  8. Scott7217's Avatar
    I don't think they were forced to watch the executions, but they thought that seeing their loved one's murderer die would somehow square things. It actually didn't, and instead of being proponents of the death penalty, they became advocates against it.
    I think pro-death penalty supporters would prefer fewer witnesses. Seeing an execution in person may change people's minds and cause them to campaign against the death penalty.
    06-03-2014 10:49 PM
  9. newbroot83's Avatar
    I think pro-death penalty supporters would prefer fewer witnesses. Seeing an execution in person may change people's minds and cause them to campaign against the death penalty.
    I disagree. I am all for the death penalty. But I would prefer more people. People are too weak these days

    Sent from my N3bulized Note 2
    06-04-2014 08:35 AM
  10. msndrstood's Avatar
    I don't see why a hefty dose of K+ wouldn't do the trick. Stops the heart. Mission accomplished. As they say.

    Sent via The Big, Bad, Beautiful Note 3
    06-04-2014 10:40 AM
  11. SteveISU's Avatar
    I don't see why a hefty dose of K+ wouldn't do the trick. Stops the heart. Mission accomplished. As they say.

    Sent via The Big, Bad, Beautiful Note 3

    This^^^^^^^
    msndrstood likes this.
    06-04-2014 11:56 AM
  12. msndrstood's Avatar
    This^^^^^^^
    Medical minds...

    Sent via The Big, Bad, Beautiful Note 3
    06-04-2014 11:57 AM
  13. Scott7217's Avatar
    I don't see why a hefty dose of K+ wouldn't do the trick. Stops the heart. Mission accomplished. As they say.
    I think the normal protocol for a lethal injection uses potassium chloride (KCl) to stop the prisoner's heart. However, potassium chloride is very painful, so you need to administer an anesthetic first. Unfortunately, the drug companies refuse to sell anesthetics to prisons now.

    We'll probably have prisons that use different drugs (with their own set of problems) or bring back older methods, like the electric chair. We now have an excuse to use methods that can increase the suffering of criminals. In some people's view, that is a good thing.
    06-04-2014 02:24 PM
  14. jdbii's Avatar
    I don't see why a hefty dose of K+ wouldn't do the trick. Stops the heart. Mission accomplished. As they say.
    Which TV station, the one in Vietnam or the one in Kyrgyzstan? K+ - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia That got me to thinking, capital punishment by watching TV? If you condemned me to watch Fox News my heart wouldn't stop but my head would implode like the Red Viper's, and by my own hands. For others, it'd be MSNBC. Mission Accomplished. lol.
    06-04-2014 03:33 PM
  15. SteveISU's Avatar
    I think the normal protocol for a lethal injection uses potassium chloride (KCl) to stop the prisoner's heart. However, potassium chloride is very painful, so you need to administer an anesthetic first. Unfortunately, the drug companies refuse to sell anesthetics to prisons now.

    We'll probably have prisons that use different drugs (with their own set of problems) or bring back older methods, like the electric chair. We now have an excuse to use methods that can increase the suffering of criminals. In some people's view, that is a good thing.

    Just pump him full of Morphine. In fact most of the states with a Death with Dignity acts use one of two barbiturates that just put someone to sleep and they slip away. Crack open 100 capsules, mix it with some apple sauce and their gone.
    msndrstood likes this.
    06-04-2014 04:02 PM
  16. Scott7217's Avatar
    Just pump him full of Morphine. In fact most of the states with a Death with Dignity acts use one of two barbiturates that just put someone to sleep and they slip away.
    The prisons used to use barbiturates, but the drug companies stopped selling them if they were going to be used for lethal injections.

    Morphine might be the next step. Most people are okay with it because the prisoner doesn't suffer (at least in theory), so they are more likely to support it.
    06-04-2014 05:40 PM
  17. palandri's Avatar
    If liability was a big issue, perhaps the government could grant immunity to the drug companies. This way the prisons would have the drugs they need to carry out an execution, and the drug companies would not have to worry about lawsuits.
    Even if they grant immunity, that won't automatically let them off the hook. There have been DA's who are suppose to be immune from liability in prosecuting cases, but if they are extremely negligent, the immunity gets waved.
    06-04-2014 09:24 PM
  18. Scott7217's Avatar
    Even if they grant immunity, that won't automatically let them off the hook. There have been DA's who are suppose to be immune from liability in prosecuting cases, but if they are extremely negligent, the immunity gets waved.
    However, if drug companies block the sale of their products to prisons, are they interfering with justice? Could a judge cite them for contempt of court?
    06-04-2014 11:12 PM
  19. NoYankees44's Avatar
    Oklahoma can certainly bring back the electric chair. I don't see anything preventing them from doing that.
    http://www.cnn.com/2014/05/22/us/tennessee-executions/
    06-05-2014 06:54 AM
  20. anon8126715's Avatar
    What pro death penalty states should do now instead of the electric chair or some medical cocktail is sentence death row inmates to a new GM vehicle.
    06-05-2014 08:26 AM
  21. Scott7217's Avatar
    Switching to the electric chair is one option. Could Tennessee also open its own drug company to make the drugs for lethal injections?
    06-05-2014 03:01 PM
  22. NoYankees44's Avatar
    Switching to the electric chair is one option. Could Tennessee also open its own drug company to make the drugs for lethal injections?
    I am sure the amount of legal red tape associated with manufacturing and selling lethal drugs is astronomical...
    06-05-2014 03:10 PM
  23. Scott7217's Avatar
    I am sure the amount of legal red tape associated with manufacturing and selling lethal drugs is astronomical...
    How much is justice worth?
    06-05-2014 03:15 PM
  24. palandri's Avatar
    Switching to the electric chair is one option....
    That would create a new job of brains cleaner upper, when their head explodes.
    06-05-2014 04:53 PM
  25. Scott7217's Avatar
    That would create a new job of brains cleaner upper, when their head explodes.
    For some people, explosions are the goal.
    06-05-2014 05:04 PM
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