06-12-2014 04:53 PM
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  1. Scott7217's Avatar
    Not all, but a higher majority than there used to be. Granted, as I stated the average worker is being worked to the bone, so I can understand coming home too tired to deal with the headaches of raising a child.
    So, the solution is to overwork the parents to a point where they won't notice what's going on with their kids?
    06-10-2014 10:42 PM
  2. anon8126715's Avatar
    So, the solution is to overwork the parents to a point where they won't notice what's going on with their kids?
    I'm sure our "corporate masters" didn't intend for those consequences, but who cares so long as the profits come in, am I right?
    06-11-2014 06:37 AM
  3. msndrstood's Avatar
    Teachers are paid to teach. That's what they should do. I homeschool my 15 year old grand daughter, I took on that responsibility. I don't expect my husband (her grandfather) to come home from work, after leaving the house at 5 am, working construction and then spending and hour and a half in traffic to sit down and review Algebra equations with her. Parents can supervise but today it is expected that parents are an extension of the teacher in the classroom. It's just not that easy. More so if there are multiple children. My parents never helped me and I never had any inkling to ask for help.

    Sent via The Big, Bad, Beautiful Note 3
    Scott7217 likes this.
    06-11-2014 08:45 AM
  4. Scott7217's Avatar
    Teachers are paid to teach. That's what they should do.
    So, when a teacher's activities outside of school (on personal time) negatively impact the children, should the parents call the administration to address the situation (which may include firing the teacher)?
    06-11-2014 12:20 PM
  5. msndrstood's Avatar
    So, when a teacher's activities outside of school (on personal time) negatively impact the children, should the parents call the administration to address the situation (which may include firing the teacher)?
    It would depend on the activity. If it's out in the public realm where it affects the teacher's ability to be effective in class, then it should be reviewed. If it's done in the privacy of a teachers home in the case of having a few drinks etc, and it doesn't affect their performance in the classroom (hungover etc) then let it be, no intervention needed. If it's blatantly illegal (sex with a minor, supplying alcohol to a minor) then it obviously needs to be addressed. It all depends on the activity.

    Sent via The Big, Bad, Beautiful Note 3
    06-11-2014 12:26 PM
  6. Scott7217's Avatar
    It all depends on the activity.
    So, let's say the parents have determined that the teacher's activity outside of class is harming their children. They plan to take their children to a different school unless the administration fires the teacher. If the administration doesn't fire the teacher, the school loses students, and that results in a loss of money for the school. Without enough students, the school cannot operate. What should the administration do?
    06-11-2014 01:12 PM
  7. msndrstood's Avatar
    So, let's say the parents have determined that the teacher's activity outside of class is harming their children. They plan to take their children to a different school unless the administration fires the teacher. If the administration doesn't fire the teacher, the school loses students, and that results in a loss of money for the school. Without enough students, the school cannot operate. What should the administration do?
    Ironically, this happened to us. Only it was the teacher's behavior in the classroom towards my 6 year old grand daughter that caused the problem.

    My daughter is in the process of transferring her to an online home school because my grand daughter begged her not to send her back to the school. The principal was notified of the behavior (abusive physical behavior; smacking her in the head, inappropriate comments; 'you're a whiney little girl with a little brain'). Said the adult to a 6 year old.

    The principal defended the teacher, my daughter said she would withdraw her from school, the teacher called my daughter crying hysterically but refused to apologize for the remarks she made, end of discussion.

    So, in this case, the school does lose. Too bad. Bad teachers need to be disciplined or fired for this type of behavior. I grew up with it in the 60's from the nuns, I would not tolerate it from a public employee, ever.

    Sent via The Big, Bad, Beautiful Note 3
    Scott7217 likes this.
    06-11-2014 01:23 PM
  8. anon8126715's Avatar
    So, let's say the parents have determined that the teacher's activity outside of class is harming their children. They plan to take their children to a different school unless the administration fires the teacher. If the administration doesn't fire the teacher, the school loses students, and that results in a loss of money for the school. Without enough students, the school cannot operate. What should the administration do?
    I don't see how a parent can make that determination to the point where they can have a teacher fired. I can understand if they want to pull their child from that institution, but they shouldn't have enough sway to influence a teacher's firing. Now if the parent wants to go to a school board meeting and explain themselves in that environment, then I say why not. But if the parent tries to make the teacher's life miserable (i.e. spread gossip and malicious rumors), then there are also laws in the book to stop that from happening, it's called slander.
    06-11-2014 05:14 PM
  9. anon8126715's Avatar
    Ironically, this happened to us. Only it was the teacher's behavior in the classroom towards my 6 year old grand daughter that caused the problem.

    My daughter is in the process of transferring her to an online home school because my grand daughter begged her not to send her back to the school. The principal was notified of the behavior (abusive physical behavior; smacking her in the head, inappropriate comments; 'you're a whiney little girl with a little brain'). Said the adult to a 6 year old.

    The principal defended the teacher, my daughter said she would withdraw her from school, the teacher called my daughter crying hysterically but refused to apologize for the remarks she made, end of discussion.

    So, in this case, the school does lose. Too bad. Bad teachers need to be disciplined or fired for this type of behavior. I grew up with it in the 60's from the nuns, I would not tolerate it from a public employee, ever.

    Sent via The Big, Bad, Beautiful Note 3
    Wow! Did you go to the school board meetings and ask to put a stop to it? Also, did you ever ask if you could sit in on the classroom to see the teacher's behavior? I would've brought it up in a school board meeting, exposed the teacher's behavior to other parents, and had enough parents scream at the teacher's behavior. Final resort, I would've set up some secret video recording device on one of the students and had video evidence sent into my local news station.
    06-11-2014 05:35 PM
  10. msndrstood's Avatar
    Wow! Did you go to the school board meetings and ask to put a stop to it? Also, did you ever ask if you could sit in on the classroom to see the teacher's behavior? I would've brought it up in a school board meeting, exposed the teacher's behavior to other parents, and had enough parents scream at the teacher's behavior. Final resort, I would've set up some secret video recording device on one of the students and had video evidence sent into my local news station.
    No, my daughter handled it. She did contact the school board but they never responded. She contacted the principal and delivered a scathing diatribe on her managerial skills and withdrew her from school.

    Sent via The Big, Bad, Beautiful Note 3
    06-11-2014 05:39 PM
  11. Scott7217's Avatar
    No, my daughter handled it. She did contact the school board but they never responded. She contacted the principal and delivered a scathing diatribe on her managerial skills and withdrew her from school.
    Your daughter did the right thing. A teacher has no right to harm a child, inside or outside of school. That includes verbal and emotional abuse, not just physical abuse. I'd wager that if more parents stepped up, it would be the teacher who would be forced to withdraw from school.
    06-12-2014 04:53 PM
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