06-07-2015 03:48 AM
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  1. anon8126715's Avatar
    The 10 year limit is an arbitrary number, and we can certainly adjust that. I just wanted to convey a sense that if the states do not reverse their bans on gay marriage, the NFL would impose a punishment (via boycott) severe enough to make the states take notice.

    Going back to Fox News, I found some interesting data that shows that in 2013, Fox took in more advertising revenue ($776.4 million) than CNN ($319.8 million) or MSNBC ($226.7 million).

    Pew Research Center -- Cable TV: Advertising Revenues for Cable News Channels (website link)

    Certainly, it would be difficult to boycott enough companies to have an adverse effect on Fox's bottom line. It makes me wonder if a lot of people like Fox News so much that they buy a lot of products that the sponsors advertise.
    You just love trying to facilitate those grass roots type movements don't you? I deem you the Ex-Lax of online grass roots movements!
    Scott7217 likes this.
    01-31-2015 11:18 AM
  2. Scott7217's Avatar
    You just love trying to facilitate those grass roots type movements don't you? I deem you the Ex-Lax of online grass roots movements!
    Well, you certainly haven't denied that grassroots movements can be effective. When Arizona tried to pass SB 1062, it only took 7 days for Governor Jan Brewer, a Republican, to veto the bill.

    If gay-rights groups wanted to attempt the same thing through the courts, I wouldn't be surprised if the whole thing ended up taking months or years to get the same result.

    Whether the same could be done to Fox News really depends on how well you can organize people.

    By the way, since you're a fan of ex-lax, don't forget that it guarantees relief every time.

    Novartis Consumer Health, Inc. -- The ex-lax Guarantee
    02-03-2015 05:56 AM
  3. anon8126715's Avatar
    Well, you certainly haven't denied that grassroots movements can be effective. When Arizona tried to pass SB 1062, it only took 7 days for Governor Jan Brewer, a Republican, to veto the bill.

    If gay-rights groups wanted to attempt the same thing through the courts, I wouldn't be surprised if the whole thing ended up taking months or years to get the same result.

    Whether the same could be done to Fox News really depends on how well you can organize people.

    By the way, since you're a fan of ex-lax, don't forget that it guarantees relief every time.

    Novartis Consumer Health, Inc. -- The ex-lax Guarantee
    It would be nice if we could just entrust our officials to do what's right for the majority without disenfranchising the minority. Instead we have big business pulling our politicians into closed door meetings creating legislation that screws over everyone else except for robber barons. Next to a politician's proven track record of voting, one of the biggest determinants of how I cast my vote is who is financially backing the candidate. Instead of our media examining each candidate, what it should be doing is examining their major contributors. When I look at someone like the Koch brothers, the first thing I think of is coal burning factories, irresponsible big business, and trickle down economics. I don't want a candidate that's going to enact policy that will accelerate what's already taking place at Koch industries. Of course, the media is in bed with all these entities so you're not going to hear some large expose that shows why the Koch brothers are so heavily invested in our political system. Granted, the media can't even report the factual events when it comes to flying around in a helicopter, so I don't see them engaging such a story.
    02-08-2015 11:48 AM
  4. Scott7217's Avatar
    It would be nice if we could just entrust our officials to do what's right for the majority without disenfranchising the minority.
    Sometimes you can't rely on government officials or journalists to do their job.

    This is why grass roots movements are so important. You hold people accountable for their actions and force them to do what is right.
    02-10-2015 07:39 PM
  5. anon8126715's Avatar
    Sometimes you can't rely on government officials or journalists to do their job.

    This is why grass roots movements are so important. You hold people accountable for their actions and force them to do what is right.
    The only problem is that these parties have figured out how to manipulate the masses. Look at the tea party, that's a faux (or is it Fox) grass roots movement. They insist that they're all about government waste, but conveniently it started after Obama took office. They insist that they started during Bush's administration, but that's been proven false. IMO, that's probably the most offensive thing about the tea party is their lack of sincerity. I actually have more respect for movements that outright will tell you they don't like Obama because of his race. At least they are honest with their prejudice.
    02-10-2015 09:28 PM
  6. Scott7217's Avatar
    The only problem is that these parties have figured out how to manipulate the masses.
    However, they are not invincible. A well-organized and determined opposition can take them on with no problem.
    02-11-2015 06:03 PM
  7. anon8126715's Avatar
    However, they are not invincible. A well-organized and determined opposition can take them on with no problem.
    Until someone hijacks the cause. » Beginning Of The End: Sarah Palin Hijacks The Tea Party Movement Alex Jones' Infowars: There's a war on for your mind! Prison Planet.com » Ron Paul Warns Of Neo-Con Takeover Of Tea Party Movement Veterans Slam Tea Party Politicians For Hijacking Protest Against War Memorial Closures | ThinkProgress

    I remember when the Tea Party movement began and how quick some people were to point out that it was hijacked by certain pundits. Interestingly enough, Google has a large assortment of articles when one types in "Tea Party Hijacked" as a search.
    02-11-2015 07:41 PM
  8. Scott7217's Avatar
    Until someone hijacks the cause.
    That is why I specified that the opposition must be well-organized and determined.

    It is no surprise that anything that is not sufficiently organized and determined would be vulnerable to hijacking.
    02-12-2015 02:36 AM
  9. anon8126715's Avatar
    That is why I specified that the opposition must be well-organized and determined.

    It is no surprise that anything that is not sufficiently organized and determined would be vulnerable to hijacking.
    So you're calling the Tea Party disorganized and un-determined? Something I can agree with.

    Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
    Scott7217 likes this.
    02-12-2015 08:00 AM
  10. JnEricsonx's Avatar
    Lemme know how many big politicians actually do that, 100% bluntly, I'll be honestly suprised if one of them pretty much say "F off (word I won't use)"
    02-12-2015 08:59 PM
  11. Scott7217's Avatar
    So you're calling the Tea Party disorganized and un-determined? Something I can agree with.
    It makes you wonder why there are Democrats that lose against Tea Party candidates in an election.

    Going back to grass roots movements, if people don't like to participate in them, they can just use the old political process as usual. That's always available.
    02-13-2015 11:50 AM
  12. anon8126715's Avatar
    It makes you wonder why there are Democrats that lose against Tea Party candidates in an election.
    Not really. When I did contract work in a small backwoods town in east Texas for Nestlé Waters, (I've mentioned this story before) Obama had just won re-election. That whole area was as politically red as the necks on the locals, and they were extremely upset by the 2012 results. There was talk of secession by Rick Perry. The bumpkins of that town were buzzing because there were a few hundred thousand signatures going around asking for Texas to secede. What I thought was funny is the people buzzing most about it were the Nestlé Waters employees. They didn't realize that if Texas had seceded, they'd probably be out of a job as the added red tape of a "foreign" company doing business in Texas would force them to leave Texas. The first thing I thought was "these people don't appear to be the brightest". My suspicions were confirmed when I heard a woman in the break room yell out enthusiastically, "We only need 200,000 more signatures and we can segregate!"
    A895 and JnEricsonx like this.
    02-13-2015 05:10 PM
  13. Scott7217's Avatar
    The attack on Charlie Hedbo proved to be a suicide mission for these goons, as 2 have been killed and one has been arrested.
    It makes me wonder if ISIS was planning their own version of the Charlie Hebdo massacre with the shooting in Texas during a Prophet Mohammed cartoon contest. Luckily, police were able to kill both gunmen, and the only other casualty was a wounded security guard.

    CNN -- ISIS claims responsibility for Texas shooting but offers no proof (article link)
    05-05-2015 10:20 PM
  14. anon8126715's Avatar
    It makes me wonder if ISIS was planning their own version of the Charlie Hebdo massacre with the shooting in Texas during a Prophet Mohammed cartoon contest. Luckily, police were able to kill both gunmen, and the only other casualty was a wounded security guard.

    CNN -- ISIS claims responsibility for Texas shooting but offers no proof (article link)
    I live about 20 minutes from where this took place. From what I understand, the people behind this event are recognized as a hate-group. I can see why. I wonder if the city would've been ok with a bible burning event or any event that would've inflamed and enraged Christians. While I don't condone any religion lashing out because of some silly belief, it seems like people are ok with sheltering Christianity from "free speech" rallies.
    A895 likes this.
    05-06-2015 04:57 AM
  15. A895's Avatar
    I live about 20 minutes from where this took place. From what I understand, the people behind this event are recognized as a hate-group. I can see why. I wonder if the city would've been ok with a bible burning event or any event that would've inflamed and enraged Christians. While I don't condone any religion lashing out because of some silly belief, it seems like people are ok with sheltering Christianity from "free speech" rallies.
    From what I understand too, the whole thing was just to make fun of Islam, and I have seen a lot of people justify it. But, when you are talking about religion, you are talking about peoples personal beliefs, and making fun of someones beliefs shouldn't be covered by the first amendment. That was just plain mean spirited. Just like if someone was burning a cross and making fun of Jesus, Christians would get upset. Same principle. I don't justify the violence, but I can see how something like that can lead to violence. People also forget about the Crusades and the "Holy War" where entire wars all over Europe were fought in the name of Christianity. Religion has always been a catalyst for violence. Despite most religions not explicitly condoning violence.
    05-06-2015 06:47 AM
  16. anon8126715's Avatar
    From what I understand too, the whole thing was just to make fun of Islam, and I have seen a lot of people justify it. But, when you are talking about religion, you are talking about peoples personal beliefs, and making fun of someones beliefs shouldn't be covered by the first amendment. That was just plain mean spirited. Just like if someone was burning a cross and making fun of Jesus, Christians would get upset. Same principle. I don't justify the violence, but I can see how something like that can lead to violence. People also forget about the Crusades and the "Holy War" where entire wars all over Europe were fought in the name of Christianity. Religion has always been a catalyst for violence. Despite most religions not explicitly condoning violence.
    I agree, although I believe that one should only hold themselves responsible for adhering to beliefs that they believe in. I personally don't have a problem with creating an image of Muhammad (sp?!?!), thus no one else should try to stop me from such an act. Just like if a Muslim chose to do something that another religion would find offensive (not something that would be immoral from a non-religious vantage point like killing non-believers), that should be their right as well.

    I personally think ridicule should be saved for lets say giving someone grief for rooting for a team of cheaters... Tom Brady likely knew of 'Deflategate' acts, report says - CNN.com Sorry I had to go there... :P
    05-06-2015 05:54 PM
  17. Scott7217's Avatar
    I don't justify the violence, but I can see how something like that can lead to violence.
    It would have been more effective to hold a protest against the Prophet Mohammed cartoon contest instead of bringing rifles to shoot people.
    05-06-2015 08:25 PM
  18. Scott7217's Avatar
    Charlie Hebdo received an award in New York:

    Reuters -- Charlie Hebdo is honored in New York under increased security (article link)

    There was some controversy, though, as some writers withdrew from the event because they believe Charlie Hebdo's content was racist and Islamophobic.

    Due to the shooting in Texas over the Prophet Mohammed cartoon contest, security was increased at the New York event.
    05-06-2015 08:35 PM
  19. Scott7217's Avatar
    But, when you are talking about religion, you are talking about peoples personal beliefs, and making fun of someones beliefs shouldn't be covered by the first amendment.
    Some states do have laws against blasphemy. Perhaps we'll see more states enact such legislation.
    05-06-2015 08:38 PM
  20. A895's Avatar
    It would have been more effective to hold a protest against the Prophet Mohammed cartoon contest instead of bringing rifles to shoot people.
    Religious people have never been known in history to always respond with nonviolence. Remember christians attacking and killing abortion doctors in the past?

    Anti-abortion violence - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    05-07-2015 02:10 AM
  21. A895's Avatar
    Some states do have laws against blasphemy. Perhaps we'll see more states enact such legislation.
    It would definitely cut through the noise. But people will always be there to complain about the First Amendment, when the First shouldn't cover someones right to be a jerk towards someones beliefs.
    05-07-2015 02:11 AM
  22. Scott7217's Avatar
    Religious people have never been known in history to always respond with nonviolence.
    It depends on the religion. Some religions have beliefs that revolve around nonviolence. I suppose we don't see them all the time because they don't make compelling headlines in the media.

    Some of the more well-known people associated with nonviolence include the 14th Dalai Lama (Buddhism), Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. (Christianity), and Mahatma Gandhi (Hinduism).
    05-07-2015 02:16 PM
  23. A895's Avatar
    It depends on the religion. Some religions have beliefs that revolve around nonviolence. I suppose we don't see them all the time because they don't make compelling headlines in the media.

    Some of the more well-known people associated with nonviolence include the 14th Dalai Lama (Buddhism), Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. (Christianity), and Mahatma Gandhi (Hinduism).
    But King was a victim of violence and was shot to death. Like I said religions often preach nonviolence but have in history perpetuated violence.
    05-07-2015 08:16 PM
  24. Scott7217's Avatar
    I wonder if the city would've been ok with a bible burning event or any event that would've inflamed and enraged Christians.
    You probably could hold a Bible burning event, but you may need someone from the fire department on standby in case the flames get out of control.
    05-07-2015 09:46 PM
  25. Scott7217's Avatar
    What I find most disturbing about the attack against Charlie Hedbo is not that these cockroaches are fighting for a religion that I consider an abomination (for the record I consider ALL religions an abomination, although some more than others), but because they are attacking our collective freedom of expression.
    This is why it is important to defend freedom of expression. Luckily, we are fighting back against those who would take away that freedom. A drone strike killed one of the leaders of Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP) that was connected to the Charlie Hebdo massacre.

    CBS News -- AQAP leader who claimed Charlie Hebdo attack killed by U.S. drone (article link)
    05-08-2015 11:38 PM
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