1. KruseLudsMobile's Avatar
    Note the below specs from the battery. Can someone decipher the meaning of the symbol that looks like a line with three short lines below it (for instance see the right side of the photo, on the second line, where it (meaning of symbol where I have put ???))?

    "INPUT: 5.0V ??? ;2.0A"?

    Also, is there a reference document someone can post here that has PD (Power Delivery) related symbol meanings and details of the current specs?

    (Please answer my first question and don't ignore it to only answer the second one - I would love answers to both but the first is my main question right now)...

    Thank you folks
    Attached Thumbnails Technical Question and Reference - Wireless 10,000 mAh Charging Battery-20190907_111635.jpg  
    09-07-2019 12:58 PM
  2. B. Diddy's Avatar
    Let me see if @Rukbat can shed some light on this (although I'm sure there are other members with that kind of knowledge as well).
    09-07-2019 01:10 PM
  3. egood71's Avatar
    I believe it means DC.
    09-07-2019 01:42 PM
  4. bbgpsuser's Avatar
    That is definitely the symbol for DC (Direct Current).
    09-07-2019 02:01 PM
  5. Mooncatt's Avatar
    The line with 3 dashes under it indicates DC voltage (AC is indicated by a sine wave line).

    What power delivery symbols are you asking about? I'm not aware of any, unless you're referring to the various USB trademark logos.
    09-07-2019 02:02 PM
  6. Rukbat's Avatar
    It's a dash, nothing more. "INPUT: 5.0V ??? ;2.0A" means 5 Volts at 2 Amps.

    PD is Qualcom's QuickCharge. (I believe PD is now up to QC 3.0. I don't think there's very much out there yet that's QC 4.0 compatible. It delivers between 3.2V and 20V at 200mV increments at up to 18 Watts (divide the wattage by the voltage to get the current available at that voltage).

    The duc (device under charge - like your phone) "negotiates" with the power supply ("charger" is a misuse of the word - the charger is a chip inside the phone, the thing you plug into a wall outlet is just a power supply) to arrive at the maximum charge the duc can accept and the power supply can deliver. (So a PD power supply charging a 2013 phone, getting nothing on the data lines, would charge at 5 Volts at up to 3.6 Amps. [The duc determines how much current it actually draws at the moment - charging varies depending on the state of charge of the battery. You can charge a phone with a 5 Volt 500 Amp power supply and it will still only draw the current it's designed to draw. A 100 Watt light bulb draws about 1 Amp at 110 Volts. Your house is probably a 200 Amp power supply, but the bulb still only draws 1 Amp.])
    anon(10274434) likes this.
    09-07-2019 02:09 PM
  7. Gary02468's Avatar
    It's a dash, nothing more. "INPUT: 5.0V ??? ;2.0A" means 5 Volts at 2 Amps.
    No, as others stated above, it's a symbol for Direct Current. See e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Direct_current .
    09-07-2019 02:12 PM
  8. anon(10274434)'s Avatar
    It's a dash, nothing more. "INPUT: 5.0V ??? ;2.0A" means 5 Volts at 2 Amps.

    PD is Qualcom's QuickCharge. (I believe PD is now up to QC 3.0. I don't think there's very much out there yet that's QC 4.0 compatible. It delivers between 3.2V and 20V at 200mV increments at up to 18 Watts (divide the wattage by the voltage to get the current available at that voltage).

    The duc (device under charge - like your phone) "negotiates" with the power supply ("charger" is a misuse of the word - the charger is a chip inside the phone, the thing you plug into a wall outlet is just a power supply) to arrive at the maximum charge the duc can accept and the power supply can deliver. (So a PD power supply charging a 2013 phone, getting nothing on the data lines, would charge at 5 Volts at up to 3.6 Amps. [The duc determines how much current it actually draws at the moment - charging varies depending on the state of charge of the battery. You can charge a phone with a 5 Volt 500 Amp power supply and it will still only draw the current it's designed to draw. A 100 Watt light bulb draws about 1 Amp at 110 Volts. Your house is probably a 200 Amp power supply, but the bulb still only draws 1 Amp.])
    Awesome info - THANKS - I "bolded" the fact I found most interesting.
    09-07-2019 02:13 PM
  9. belodion's Avatar
    Thread cleaned. We need to be friends. I don't say we have to get married, but we do need to be nice to one another.
    09-08-2019 03:23 PM
  10. B. Diddy's Avatar
    mustang7757 likes this.
    09-09-2019 11:06 PM

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