08-27-2017 02:46 AM
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  1. TheOtherBill's Avatar
    Use your stock Samsung charger. It is 2000mA.
    While charging, check the status, it should say charging AC, if it says charging USB you're on a slow charge. It can take an extra 5 hours or so to a full charge.
    05-07-2013 08:46 PM
  2. alan joseph's Avatar
    I'm having the same issue. The only way I can charge my phone is if I power off the device and let it sit there for 10+ hours. I even purchased an extra battery and that seemed to work for 1 day.
    06-17-2013 12:55 AM
  3. pkamerman's Avatar
    i am rooted and having the same problem, any suggestions
    06-26-2013 01:59 PM
  4. jamm1983's Avatar
    Hi everyone I am so stressed now, I dropped my phone in the water and that day I bring the phone the Samsung Service Center, one by the way my phone is Samsung galaxy note 2. So the diagnose of my phone it says its all damage the board is dead if I want to they will change but OMG its very costly. Pls any help to advice me what to do. My phone is 5 months old only. Is there possible that I can buy board where I can replace my damage board? Pls I need help.
    07-01-2013 01:58 PM
  5. Retops's Avatar
    I am beginning to think the Note 2 and I were not meant for each other. The first one I bought was ruined when I dropped it into water. The second one has the weird charging problem mentioned above. It will not charge when the phone is on. To charge it I must turn off the phone and when the phone is fully off, plug in the cable. It also goes into "dock mode" at times for no reason.

    When the phone is on, if I plug in the charger, it will cause the phone screen to become unresponsive and the charger must be disconnected to even turn it off.

    The phone is stock and the charger is the one that came with it. AT&T is sending me a new charger, but I am pretty sure it is the USB module. Kind of irritating.
    07-14-2013 09:26 AM
  6. Blake Buckner's Avatar
    I have a Galaxy Note 2 - model i1317 and experienced this problem as well. When I would plug in the charger, the charge indicator would cycle on and off - along with the little sound (Duh, dip!) - sometimes it would think a dock was connected when there was none. Sometimes it would charge up 30-40% and then start freaking out again.

    After reading the responses here, and on other forums, I was set to send it to Samsung to have the charging unit replaced. Fortunately for me in this case, I procrastinated for a day or so. I decided to give it one last chance, plugged it in and ta-da - no more problems.

    Here's what I think the issue is. The USB port is HIGHLY sensitive to moisture. The first time I experienced the problem was after a motorcycle trip - it was raining and I had my Note 2 in the "tank bag" on my bike, which is water proof. It was exposed to moisture, but not anything that would have made me suspect a malfunction - no more than you would say using your phone under an umbrella on a rainy day - moist, but not wet. The problem resolved in a day or so. Then about 2 weeks later I started having the same problem, but then remembered the night before my Note 2 had been sitting in contact with a damp kitchen towel - the USB port end was under the towel. Again, I didn't think much about it at first, but then it dawned on me this might be the problem. Sure enough after a day or so of drying out I have no more problems.

    Don't even show a glass of water to your Galaxy Note 2.
    07-20-2013 10:20 AM
  7. seanirani's Avatar
    .Thanks Kyle,
    I think buying an external charger works fine... I got one from a Samsung store & it came with an extra battery, the only problem is connecting to a PC using a USB port... that wont work...
    07-23-2013 02:42 AM
  8. Chanelle Walker's Avatar
    How do you rebooted the note 2.
    08-01-2013 04:56 PM
  9. djkdawg's Avatar
    so after having my phone in my pocket while it was pouring down, my note decided it didnt want to charge the battery if i let it completely die, if i plugged it in before it died, it will charge fine but after the battery die, i was getting no juice no matter what i did, so my solution was to buy a new battery and that worked until i let it completely drain and die, so i looked at the usb port on my note and it looked a little corroded, so i cleaned it out really good with some rubbing alcohol, which was hard i had to find something sturdy and skinny to fit in there but after i shined it all back up and put the charger in , lord behold, it started charging normal, so i would say try cleaning the port, really really good, i bet the contacts are just dirty from the water and pocket lint
    08-04-2013 08:43 AM
  10. Pacai's Avatar
    Hey, how long do they took time for replacing the new USB port module?
    i guess mine also face same problem with you..
    Is it difficult to get spare parts of them?
    What about the cost then?
    08-12-2013 12:02 AM
  11. DesElms's Avatar
    Hey this is a REAL ANSWER TO YOUR SITUATION THAT WILL WORK. I'm guessing your device is rooted ? Because my Galaxy s2 epic 4g had the same problem, It wouldn't hold its charge. At first i thought it was the battery. First do the "spin test" Laying out your battery and try spinning it, If it spins than you will need a new battery if not than your battery is fine. So DO NOT buy a battery, It won't solve the issue unless your battery is bad. To fix your phone you will need around $5-$25. Now go onto ebay and order a brand new EXTERNAL DOCK CHARGER.Make sure it is to charge the battery itself and not the whole phone and be sure to type in the type of phone you have so you get the right one. Now you'll have to take out the battery and charge it but it will work, I guarantee it will. I ordered mine last week and got my dock charger today , Charged it and it worked completely fine. Works and now I have my phone running without taking it to the store to get it fixed or buy a new one. PLEASE give this a thumbs up, so others will see this so it will help them also.
    This is a ridiculous solution; I wish there were a "thumbs down" or "dislike" choice. Workarounds, like this one, are NEVER the right choice; they're just temporary. The only right way to do something is to do it right. If the USB port's bad, then one gets it repaired... properly. Additionally, I suspect the cost of the USB port module, as a part -- even with shipping -- is less than the cost of the dock.

    Moreover, spinning the battery isn't even a good way to tell if it's swollen, much less actually needs replacement.

    I'm surprised your solution didn't include dancing around while swinging a dead cat and whooping to the gods.
    10-24-2013 09:06 PM
  12. transistors's Avatar
    11-18-2013 08:57 AM
  13. DesElms's Avatar
    I'm sorry, but that thread's first two posts -- by that thread's starter (aka, its "original poster" or "OP") -- are just ridiculously wrong and misleading.

    I have, however, added a third post to that thread which sets straight the record; and provides any Samsung Galaxy famly phone user -- particularly a Note II user -- with pretty much everything s/he needs to know about this subject.
    11-19-2013 02:06 PM
  14. Golfdriver97's Avatar

    Moreover, spinning the battery isn't even a good way to tell if it's swollen, much less actually needs replacement.
    Actually, it is. And it does work.

    From a Sprint Moto X using AC forums app
    11-19-2013 02:18 PM
  15. DesElms's Avatar
    Actually, it is. And it does work.

    From a Sprint Moto X using AC forums app
    Actually, yes, spinning the battery can be at least one way of determining if it's swollen; and, yes, it does work for at least that purpose... mostly. But it's far from the best way; and is mostly unnecessary, in any case. Moreover, it cannot necessarily tell if the battery's bad since even a battery that isn't swollen may nevertheless still be bad... and, actually, vice versa, truth be known. That said, yes, if a battery's swollen, then it should be replaced, just as a matter of good practice, no matter what.

    Any not-swollen battery will lie completely flat, on both sides, on any (likely table or desk) flat surface. And by "flat," I mean that one should not be able to "rock" the battery, as if on a fulcrum, by pressing on any corner or side of the battery, when lying flat on either of its sides, and assuming that the table or desk on which it's lying is dead flat, itself. The reason spinning is a kind of nice way of doing it is that it can reveal a swollen spot even if the underlying table or desk isn't dead flat, itself; but all it shows is if the battery's swollen, which may or may not also mean that it's bad (though, again, if it's swollen, it should be replaced, regardless).

    The only true way to determine if a battery's bad is to put it on a tester that's made for it, and which tests it under load. Most carrier device support centers (and, of course, Samsung; and any Samsung-authorized repair/refurbishment center; and many independent repair centers have such battery testing equipment (though I've seen several of their technicians nevertheless insensibly using the spinning method).
    11-19-2013 02:31 PM
  16. Golfdriver97's Avatar
    Actually, yes, spinning the battery can be at least one way of determining if it's swollen; and, yes, it does work for at least that purpose... mostly. But it's far from the best way; and is mostly unnecessary, in any case. Moreover, it cannot necessarily tell if the battery's bad since even a battery that isn't swollen may nevertheless still be bad... and, actually, vice versa, truth be known. That said, yes, if a battery's swollen, then it should be replaced, just as a matter of good practice, no matter what.

    Any not-swollen battery will lie completely flat, on both sides, on any (likely table or desk) flat surface. And by "flat," I mean that one should not be able to "rock" the battery, as if on a fulcrum, by pressing on any corner or side of the battery, when lying flat on either of its sides, and assuming that the table or desk on which it's lying is dead flat, itself. The reason spinning is a kind of nice way of doing it is that it can reveal a swollen spot even if the underlying table or desk isn't dead flat, itself; but all it shows is if the battery's swollen, which may or may not also mean that it's bad (though, again, if it's swollen, it should be replaced, regardless).

    The only true way to determine if a battery's bad is to put it on a tester that's made for it, and which tests it under load. Most carrier device support centers (and, of course, Samsung; and any Samsung-authorized repair/refurbishment center; and many independent repair centers have such battery testing equipment (though I've seen several of their technicians nevertheless insensibly using the spinning method).
    A voltmeter will do the same thing.

    From a Sprint Moto X using AC forums app
    11-19-2013 02:42 PM
  17. DesElms's Avatar
    A voltmeter will do the same thing.
    Not unless it has a specific battery-under-load testing component.

    As I have occasion to write many times around here, bone-up on Ohm's Law. A multi-tester/volt-ohm meter cannot test a battery for anything but its voltage, which remains the same no matter the condition of the battery unless its ability to even deliver voltage has been damaged (and, if so, then the battery will most likely be completely dead and unable to either deliver or receive any electricity at all); and which also has nothing to do with whether it can deliver its rated milliamps, and/or for how long. It's about current (amperage), not voltage... there's a difference... again, Ohm's Law.

    And, of course, no battery's ability to deliver amps, and under what circumstances, and for how long, and/or how reliably, etc., may be determined unless said battery is under load. Standard volt-ohm multitesters, unless they have a battery-under-load testing component built-in to them, cannot do that.

    Moreover, some cell phone batteries can actually be damaged by the loads imposed by not-cell-phone-battery-specific testers.
    11-19-2013 06:25 PM
  18. Golfdriver97's Avatar
    Not unless it has a specific battery-under-load testing component.

    As I have occasion to write many times around here, bone-up on Ohm's Law. A multi-tester/volt-ohm meter cannot test a battery for anything but its voltage, which remains the same no matter the condition of the battery unless its ability to even deliver voltage has been damaged (and, if so, then the battery will most likely be completely dead and unable to either deliver or receive any electricity at all); and which also has nothing to do with whether it can deliver its rated milliamps, and/or for how long. It's about current (amperage), not voltage... there's a difference... again, Ohm's Law.

    And, of course, no battery's ability to deliver amps, and under what circumstances, and for how long, and/or how reliably, etc., may be determined unless said battery is under load. Standard volt-ohm multitesters, unless they have a battery-under-load testing component built-in to them, cannot do that.

    Moreover, some cell phone batteries can actually be damaged by the loads imposed by not-cell-phone-battery-specific testers.
    But if it doesn't have minimum volts to operate, it won't work either.
    11-19-2013 06:31 PM
  19. DesElms's Avatar
    But if it doesn't have minimum volts to operate, it won't work either.
    Which my words "unless its ability to even deliver voltage has been damaged (and, if so, then the battery will most likely be completely dead and unable to either deliver or receive any electricity at all)" more-than-adequately covered.

    You seem to be making the mistake of assuming that a swollen battery is automatically bad; or can't deliver voltage... even its rated voltage. You read -- no, actually read -- my earlier writing here on all this, right?
    11-19-2013 06:49 PM
  20. Golfdriver97's Avatar
    Which my words "unless its ability to even deliver voltage has been damaged (and, if so, then the battery will most likely be completely dead and unable to either deliver or receive any electricity at all)" more-than-adequately covered.

    You seem to be making the mistake of assuming that a swollen battery is automatically bad; or can't deliver voltage... even its rated voltage. You read -- no, actually read -- my earlier writing here on all this, right?
    Community Rules & Guidelines - Mobile Nations Forums
    11-19-2013 07:04 PM
  21. DesElms's Avatar
    Your point being? There's been no rules and/or guidelines violation, here. Stop trying to intimidate people.
    L1NGUS likes this.
    11-19-2013 07:29 PM
  22. Paul627g's Avatar
    This is a ridiculous solution; I wish there were a "thumbs down" or "dislike" choice.
    You read -- no, actually read -- my earlier writing here on all this, right?
    Your point being? There's been no rules and/or guidelines violation, here. Stop trying to intimidate people.
    DesElms,

    You seem like a very knowledgeable individual and we appreciate that in the forums. However the comments I quoted above didn't set a good atmosphere in the thread by first calling a previous poster's comments ridiculous and wrong and comments of dancing with dead cats, etc. That will always set a negative tone even if the information provided by you is indeed correct.

    That said, we appreciate all contributions in the forums especially those coming from our AC Ambassadors which volunteer countless hours every day just like our Moderating staff and ask nothing in return except to be treated fairly just as any member should.

    That said if we can keep this discussion/debate on topic and not allow things to get personal then all can benefit from this and learn something here.

    Thanks,

    Paul
    Forums Moderator/Ambassador Team Leader.
    sMt73, Kevin OQuinn and B. Diddy like this.
    11-19-2013 07:50 PM
  23. brentj's Avatar
    My GN2 stopped charging today. I tried two batteries and two chargers (both of which worked with another device). After finding and reading this thread, I recalled that I had gotten a bit of water on the lower part of my phone today. I turned it off, removed the battery, and cleaned the USB port. I used a tiny screwdriver with a bit of lint free lens paper wrapped around it, to which I applied a drop of Deoxit Gold contact cleaner (previously purchased from Amazon). phone is now charging just fine.
    12-03-2013 10:17 PM
  24. Toolman_Johnny's Avatar
    Same problem here. Cleaned the Micro USB port with some electrical cleaner spray (battery removed at the time) and it has worked fine ever since.
    12-04-2013 06:55 AM
  25. sMt73's Avatar
    Funny how every thread I read with certain people (Mr Elms) responding to it, it ends up having a mod step in. Tired of reading novels in a tech forum.
    12-06-2013 06:33 PM
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