11-16-2014 12:46 PM
28 12
tools
  1. TRAVR6's Avatar
    I have never rooted a phone and everyone I talked to says it's the way to go.

    I followed these instructions since it had an easy recovery if things went wrong.

    Well thing went wrong and it won't recover.

    I tried Kies but it says it does not work with this phone.


    I get this error

    Firmware upgrade encountered an issue. Please select recovery mode in Kies and try again.

    If anyone can help get me back to a working phone it would be greatly appreciated
    10-24-2014 09:21 PM
  2. Dukins's Avatar
    It's not bricked. Got to xda and download Odin and the original stock rom. Really generic instructions you can find the official steps there at xda.
    10-24-2014 09:31 PM
  3. TRAVR6's Avatar
    I already tried ODIN. I have 3.7 which has the option for PDA and 3.10 which does not.
    3.7 fails when I try to load.

    I cannot find the stock ROM for the note 4.
    This is my first time rooting.
    Can you provide links for the stock rom and instructions?

    I have searched and tried everything I have found so far. Nothing has worked.
    RayRay5555 likes this.
    10-24-2014 09:44 PM
  4. lazerproof's Avatar
    What method did you use? On xda developers forum in the note 4 orginal android development forum is a post by chainfire. His is the most reliable method, but you are supposed to follow instructions to the letter. I highly recommend as others have suggested to go to xda, you'll need Odin if you don't already have it and the original rom. Your best bet Is to See if you can get chainfire to help. He visits there frequently. Don't pm him as he will not respond. Post a question in the relevant forum for your phone.

    Update: you should be able to find your original rom for your phone on xda.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    10-24-2014 09:46 PM
  5. TRAVR6's Avatar
    I posted the link to the instructions I used. Chainfire was given credit for it.

    There is nothing on XDA in regards to the stock rom. At least that I could find.

    I will post up for assistance there as well.
    10-24-2014 09:50 PM
  6. TRAVR6's Avatar
    There does not appear to be any stock roms for the note 4 yet
    10-24-2014 09:59 PM
  7. lazerproof's Avatar
    I posted the link to the instructions I used. Chainfire was given credit for it.

    There is nothing on XDA in regards to the stock rom. At least that I could find.

    I will post up for assistance there as well.
    That's your best bet. I am sure someone on xda has it since once you root you can back it up. Good luck! Let us know how you make out. If I can come up with anything, I'll let you know here.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    10-24-2014 10:08 PM
  8. TRAVR6's Avatar
    Thank you all. I will post up if I find the fix
    10-24-2014 10:12 PM
  9. lazerproof's Avatar
    Thank you all. I will post up if I find the fix
    Who is your carrier?

    Posted via the Android Central App
    10-24-2014 10:16 PM
  10. TRAVR6's Avatar
    sprint
    10-24-2014 10:20 PM
  11. TRAVR6's Avatar
    I think I fixed it.

    I found this link on XDA

    Found my exact model number and used that. ODIN installed it and all appears well.
    10-24-2014 10:37 PM
  12. lazerproof's Avatar
    sprint
    So I'm assuming that you specifically downloaded the files for sprint?

    Posted via the Android Central App
    10-24-2014 10:39 PM
  13. lazerproof's Avatar
    I think I fixed it.

    I found this link on XDA

    Found my exact model number and used that. ODIN installed it and all appears well.
    O.k. so you are rooted. That's what I had asked, if you downloaded the right files for your phone and carrier? That is the link I was originally referring you to. Glad you are fixed.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    10-24-2014 10:48 PM
  14. phillthedrill's Avatar
    I would encourage everyone to wait a little while until they put up stock roms on the XDA before trying to root the phone. Just in case something goes wrong, you can always ODIN back to stock. I have the Verizon Note 4 and I don't see anything to root it yet. Yes, I am root happy as well.
    UniQue WerkX likes this.
    10-24-2014 10:59 PM
  15. itsnotmeitsyou's Avatar
    When it comes to Odin, absolutely only flash firmware made specifically for your model [carrier]. It's very hard to screw up beyond repair with a Samsung, as long as you follow basic instructions. Glad you got it fixed.

    Sent from my SM-N910T using Tapatalk
    UniQue WerkX likes this.
    10-25-2014 12:23 AM
  16. larry0071's Avatar
    Does getting root access void the Knox warranty? All I'd like to do is get root access to Uninstall the things like Verizon navigator and other baked in things that are meaningless to me. I'm one of the oddities that had made friends with Samsung and TouchWiz, so I've no interest in customized software.
    10-25-2014 03:39 PM
  17. sk3litor's Avatar
    Does getting root access void the Knox warranty? All I'd like to do is get root access to Uninstall the things like Verizon navigator and other baked in things that are meaningless to me. I'm one of the oddities that had made friends with Samsung and TouchWiz, so I've no interest in customized software.
    Actually Knox is useless on consumer phones. It's made for business and government phones. That being said of coarse it's up to you.
    10-25-2014 07:34 PM
  18. jpr's Avatar
    Actually Knox is useless on consumer phones. It's made for business and government phones. That being said of coarse it's up to you.
    1. This isn't true. Quite a few consumers choose to use Knox without being required to.

    2. Regardless of whether you want to use KNOX, tripping KNOX will void the warranty, so there is plenty of reason to care about it.

    3. This will also lower resale value.
    10-25-2014 08:10 PM
  19. jpr's Avatar
    Does getting root access void the Knox warranty? All I'd like to do is get root access to Uninstall the things like Verizon navigator and other baked in things that are meaningless to me. I'm one of the oddities that had made friends with Samsung and TouchWiz, so I've no interest in customized software.
    The current root methods do trip KNOX. It's not impossible to root a phone without tripping the counter but as far as I know there are not currently any methods to do so on the Note 4.

    Edit: Just wanted to add that I notice you mention Verizon. You cannot even root a Verizon Note 4 at all right now, so you don't even have a decision to make.
    10-25-2014 08:19 PM
  20. lazerproof's Avatar
    Actually Knox is useless on consumer phones. It's made for business and government phones. That being said of coarse it's up to you.
    Actually that's not quite true. Knox has 3 systems. Knox counter, which keeps track of whether you rooted your phone, and will void your warranty on anything that got damaged do to you rooting. Then there is knox personal (my knox ) which is a free service for anyone. My knox creates a container. Any app in that container cannot access anything outside of the container on your phone, and nothing on your phone can access the apps in that container. This is similar to private mode but with no limits as to what can go in there. My knox is currently available only for the s5, but it is expected that it will soon be available on the note 4 and other phones. Finally there is knox enterprise which works like my knox but with a bunch of added features and it cost money. A word of warning to those who are interested in rooting. If you do, obviously you will trip knox and MAY loose all knox functionality, my knox, knox enterprise, and private mode and never be able to get them back, even if you go back to original unrooted rom.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    10-25-2014 08:35 PM
  21. smooth3006's Avatar
    Actually that's not quite true. Knox has 3 systems. Knox counter, which keeps track of whether you rooted your phone, and will void your warranty on anything that got damaged do to you rooting. Then there is knox personal (my knox ) which is a free service for anyone. My knox creates a container. Any app in that container cannot access anything outside of the container on your phone, and nothing on your phone can access the apps in that container. This is similar to private mode but with no limits as to what can go in there. My knox is currently available only for the s5, but it is expected that it will soon be available on the note 4 and other phones. Finally there is knox enterprise which works like my knox but with a bunch of added features and it cost money. A word of warning to those who are interested in rooting. If you do, obviously you will trip knox and MAY loose all knox functionality, my knox, knox enterprise, and private mode and never be able to get them back, even if you go back to original unrooted rom.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    anyone who roots shouldn't be worried about warranty anyways.
    10-26-2014 10:11 AM
  22. monsieurms's Avatar
    I think I fixed it.

    I found this link on XDA

    Found my exact model number and used that. ODIN installed it and all appears well.
    So, now that you're back up and running and presumably rooted, do you feel you gained anything by rooting that was worth this hassle? Serious question, no harassment implied!
    10-26-2014 03:09 PM
  23. Jaime Cormier's Avatar
    Don't root it next time
    10-26-2014 03:57 PM
  24. JW0914's Avatar
    So, now that you're back up and running and presumably rooted, do you feel you gained anything by rooting that was worth this hassle? Serious question, no harassment implied!
    Quite a bit is gained by rooting, of which has nothing to do with custom ROMs... Until Android 5 [Lollipop] is loaded onto a device, Android remains the least secure OS on the market. There are ways to lock down your phone's security and prevent malicious code and malware from infecting your device; prevent apps from gaining network access via IP Tables, only allowing apps access to WiFi or 3G/4G (vice versa) or both; killing the insane list of startup apps, of which almost every app you install sets itself up to startup when the phone boots which bogs down the responsiveness of the device (Windows users are familiar with this); use a SD card (for those that have the option) for swap, set up an ext3/ext4 partition for apps; and so many more, all of which require admin access to the OS (think "Run as Administrator" on Windows). Root is literally the equivalent of the built in Administrator account on Windows and is why it's called "root".

    Most are uninformed about what root really means and what it actually does. Root, in and of itself, does not alter system files... it simply gives you the superuser (Administrator for Windows users) permissions to access system files. Think of it this way... you probably own a Windows PC, and you probably have yourself set as an administrator account on that PC... imagine not being able to use your control panel, alter your firewall settings, edit/change system files (like your hosts file), run system utilities like System File Checker (sfc /scan), create your own Windows PE/RE WIM image, which requires DISM and DISM requires itself to be run as administrator, install software or drivers, run an executable (which requires administrator permissions due to User Account Control), alter group policy, use Hyper-V or a VM equivalent, and the list goes on, simply because you're barred from having an administrator account by the OEM of your computer.

    Most are also told rooting voids your warranty, which if you've actually taken the time to read the warranty, you find is completely false. If you root your device, the ONLY way, I repeat, the ONLY way it voids your warranty is if the problem you're experiencing can be directly traced to your activities from rooting. In other words, if a software glitch or hardware failure results in a warranty claim, it has to be honored by federal law; however, if you alter your build.prop or delete a system file AND the OEM/Carrier can prove this, your warranty is voided. The burden of proof lies with the OEM/Carrier, not the end user (you do not have to prove you didn't root your device and caused the issue... they must prove you rooted your device AND activities related from rooting caused the issue). It's sad that instead of actually reading your warranty T&Cs, most users simply choose to parrot what they've been told by others that never bothered to read the warranty. It doesn't matter that customer service, a sales person, or a corporate employee of a carrier tells you differently... the only thing that matters is what's in black and white in the contract the OEM has with an end user, which is known by the term "Terms & Conditions". T&Cs are not some silly piece of paper... it is a federal (and sometimes state) binding contract between the OEM and the end user.
    phillthedrill likes this.
    11-16-2014 09:39 AM
  25. monsieurms's Avatar
    Most are also told rooting voids your warranty, which if you've actually taken the time to read the warranty, you find is completely false. If you root your device, the ONLY way, I repeat, the ONLY way it voids your warranty is if the problem you're experiencing can be directly traced to your activities from rooting.
    Well, yes. I always thought that was fairly obvious.

    Of course, most average people if forced to sue for small amounts--these may be claims worth only a couple of hundred bucks-- won't. When the subject is breached, chaos can ensue. So, if yelling at the carrier or manufacturer has no effect, and it often doesn't, a typical consumer is screwed. It can be like talking to a wall. Theory is one thing. Reality is another. If you're a lawyer who can represent yourself for free and make arguments about contracts of adhesion, construing contracts against the drafter, unfair trade practice claims and so on, and then ALSO act as your own expert and argue the tech well enough to convince a court against the line of attack from the Defendant, you may be in good shape. That may not be many people. If you have to sue the manufacturer all by yourself and you deliver pizza for a living, it may not be pretty.

    Which is to say, avoiding arguments about when your warranty is breached and why is probably a pretty prudent course of action for most. If you still have rights after rooting, many will also find that they have a right without a practical remedy because it is just too difficult to sue. That is the equivalent of "no rights" if the manufacturer or carrier takes a hard line and/or disagrees with the claim that the rooting did no harm. I believe you are correct in your description of how the burden of proof shifts in court, but that may not be how it works on the telephone dealing with a CSR.

    As for being a superuser, I wonder how many will take full advantage of that....? When you talk about things like "set up an ext3/ext4 partition for apps;" I suspect most who are rooting are doing it for far simpler reasons.
    11-16-2014 10:16 AM
28 12

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