11-02-2015 09:21 AM
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  1. jamjordan's Avatar
    How did you do this? Not a picture buff but like this.
    12-12-2014 09:21 AM
  2. NVNJ's Avatar
    Huh?

    Posted via the Android Central App
    12-12-2014 10:17 AM
  3. Rmbrown1964's Avatar
    I have the same problem! please keep this thread up to date. Let's hope it's a software problem!

    Posted via the Android Central App
    12-12-2014 10:46 AM
  4. NVNJ's Avatar
    Indeed we will. Here is a still picture. Looks............ blurry?

    Posted via the Android Central App
    Attached Thumbnails Note 4 camera and moving objects (i.e. kids)-20141209_185606.jpg  
    SteveISU likes this.
    12-12-2014 10:58 AM
  5. SteveISU's Avatar
    One boxer deserves another.
    Attached Thumbnails Note 4 camera and moving objects (i.e. kids)-1418404527769.jpg   Note 4 camera and moving objects (i.e. kids)-1418404617348.jpg  
    NVNJ likes this.
    12-12-2014 11:17 AM
  6. LaTuFu's Avatar
    For me the biggest thing I've realized is, this camera wants to take pictures in low light (i.e. without the flash) in situations that my S4 would have triggered the flash without hesitation. Even when I set the flash to auto, it will try to do a low light shot instead, and I know that my old S4 would have been flash. In our downstairs family room, taking pictures of our animals, that is a virtually guaranteed flash shot on my S4. My Note 4 won't use the flash unless I make it do it.

    I've realized that the best way to get low light pictures is the way you SHOULD get low light pictures--with a flash. One thing I've noticed on the Note 4 that I like better than my S4, you can adjust exposure of the flash in auto setting a whole lot easier than you could on the S4. Using the flash at "0" can have a tendency to overexpose/white out people, especially close up. If I have the opportunity to back off the exposure to -0.5 or -1.0 it can help a lot.

    Low light still shots, this camera does a great job, and I stack it up against any camera phone out there that is available. Low light motion, I see all the feedback about the 6/6+ doing well in those moments, but I get pretty solid shots using the flash, and the pictures come out much better all around, in my opinion.

    Its hard to get any camera to capture motion in low light without blurring. I never question it when I have to use a flash with my Canon DSLR, so I'm certainly not going to expect my camera phone to be able to outperform my DSLR.

    I'm impressed with the 6+ low light capability, but with little fuss you can get the Note 4 to do a solid job as well.
    12-12-2014 11:40 AM
  7. LegalAmerican's Avatar
    If you want things to look crisp and still on the Note 4, i've learned a little trick. You download the feature that freezes time and once everyone has been frozen and can't move, you snap a few shots. Make sure to grab a few angles and then look later to decide what you prefer. If you don't use that mode, you will not get crisp shots of moving objects.
    12-12-2014 11:48 AM
  8. dpham00's Avatar
    For me the biggest thing I've realized is, this camera wants to take pictures in low light (i.e. without the flash) in situations that my S4 would have triggered the flash without hesitation. Even when I set the flash to auto, it will try to do a low light shot instead, and I know that my old S4 would have been flash. In our downstairs family room, taking pictures of our animals, that is a virtually guaranteed flash shot on my S4. My Note 4 won't use the flash unless I make it do it.

    I've realized that the best way to get low light pictures is the way you SHOULD get low light pictures--with a flash. One thing I've noticed on the Note 4 that I like better than my S4, you can adjust exposure of the flash in auto setting a whole lot easier than you could on the S4. Using the flash at "0" can have a tendency to overexpose/white out people, especially close up. If I have the opportunity to back off the exposure to -0.5 or -1.0 it can help a lot.

    Low light still shots, this camera does a great job, and I stack it up against any camera phone out there that is available. Low light motion, I see all the feedback about the 6/6+ doing well in those moments, but I get pretty solid shots using the flash, and the pictures come out much better all around, in my opinion.

    Its hard to get any camera to capture motion in low light without blurring. I never question it when I have to use a flash with my Canon DSLR, so I'm certainly not going to expect my camera phone to be able to outperform my DSLR.

    I'm impressed with the 6+ low light capability, but with little fuss you can get the Note 4 to do a solid job as well.
    Do you use flash for low light motion shots? Or low-light stationary object?

    Sent from my Verizon Samsung Galaxy Note 4
    12-12-2014 11:54 AM
  9. LaTuFu's Avatar
    Do you use flash for low light motion shots? Or low-light stationary object?
    The short answer is, low light motion. A flash is the only way you're going to get a good sharp picture in low light, if that is what you're trying to do. Even the 6+ pictures are going to sacrifice something in the picture in low light without a flash. Shorter depth of field maybe? I dunno, I really need to get my hands on one for a few days.

    The long answer is, it depends on the circumstances. My Dad was a professional photographer so I grew up in the days of SLRs, light meters, master and slave flash setups, and the tricks of the trade back in the days before you knew instantly whether or not you got a good shot. I grew up "bracketing" shots: find the right shutter speed and f-stop for your shot, take a few pics, then back off a couple of settings on either side and take a few shots there, too. Think the Goldilocks method of photography. One shot should be too dark, one should be too light, and the other should be juuuuuuust right. If you knew what you were doing, that's usually how it worked out, too.

    I try to do the same thing even today with digital cameras. If my subjects are willing and I have the time, I'll bracket a lot of ways. With flash, without flash, adjust exposure, etc. Then use Snapseed or similar to help make the final "dark room" adjustments to draw out the finished product.

    I may be wrong, but I feel like the Note 4's camera improved its performance for me the minute I got done downloading all of the available shooting modes from the Galaxy app store, too. I hardly ever use those modes, but the camera seems to be much more responsive since I did it.

    I know it isn't a perfect camera, and when people compare it to a 6+ they think it isn't as good. But as a lifelong photographer, I can say that I am pretty blown away by the capabilities of this camera. It is not too far off of the capabilities of a DSLR from 3-4 years ago, and in some ways it is probably more capable. And it's on a phone! It isn't always point and shoot friendly, right away, but once you learn how it functions, you can get some pretty rock solid shots with it.
    Connert, PookiePrancer and dpham00 like this.
    12-12-2014 12:05 PM
  10. Thegreatone3's Avatar
    I've been able to get some nice shots of my always-moving seven month old with the Note 4. I have not experienced what the iPhone 6/6+ are capable of, but from what I've seen from phones owned by friends and family, the Note 4 is at or near the top of Android flagship phone cameras (Galaxy S5, HTC One M8, Nexus 6, Moto X, Droid Turbo,LG G3).
    12-12-2014 12:05 PM
  11. LaTuFu's Avatar
    Here's a quick example of a recent bracket shot. I can't remember what I did different between the two, but neither of them are using the flash.

    My cat was a patient subject.

    I realize these aren't motion shots and that's what we were talking about. I just don't happen to have any on the phone at the moment.



    12-12-2014 12:11 PM
  12. Fluffyman's Avatar
    Coming from someone who owned the S2, S4, S5 and experience with the Note 4:

    The camera in Samsung devices just suck. They are technically able to take great pictures if you always tap to focus and hold the phone very still with two hands. Doing it any different leads to more or less blurred pictures.
    Impossible to use the camera one handed.

    My sister had the iPhone 4s and now the iPhone 6 and the cameras on both are on a whole different level, simply because the pictures are almost always sharp. No need for tap to focus, no need for two handed use.

    Apple has the shutter speed right, Samsung has it wrong.
    12-12-2014 12:35 PM
  13. dpham00's Avatar
    The short answer is, low light motion. A flash is the only way you're going to get a good sharp picture in low light, if that is what you're trying to do. Even the 6+ pictures are going to sacrifice something in the picture in low light without a flash. Shorter depth of field maybe? I dunno, I really need to get my hands on one for a few days.

    The long answer is, it depends on the circumstances. My Dad was a professional photographer so I grew up in the days of SLRs, light meters, master and slave flash setups, and the tricks of the trade back in the days before you knew instantly whether or not you got a good shot. I grew up "bracketing" shots: find the right shutter speed and f-stop for your shot, take a few pics, then back off a couple of settings on either side and take a few shots there, too. Think the Goldilocks method of photography. One shot should be too dark, one should be too light, and the other should be juuuuuuust right. If you knew what you were doing, that's usually how it worked out, too.

    I try to do the same thing even today with digital cameras. If my subjects are willing and I have the time, I'll bracket a lot of ways. With flash, without flash, adjust exposure, etc. Then use Snapseed or similar to help make the final "dark room" adjustments to draw out the finished product.

    I may be wrong, but I feel like the Note 4's camera improved its performance for me the minute I got done downloading all of the available shooting modes from the Galaxy app store, too. I hardly ever use those modes, but the camera seems to be much more responsive since I did it.

    I know it isn't a perfect camera, and when people compare it to a 6+ they think it isn't as good. But as a lifelong photographer, I can say that I am pretty blown away by the capabilities of this camera. It is not too far off of the capabilities of a DSLR from 3-4 years ago, and in some ways it is probably more capable. And it's on a phone! It isn't always point and shoot friendly, right away, but once you learn how it functions, you can get some pretty rock solid shots with it.
    You bring up some good points but for me, the most critical are spur of the moment indoors shots of my very active toddler. And for that, the 6p is better. If I spent the time to make adjustments then the shot is gone.


    Flash doesn't work for me, because the Flash will distract my daughter from what she is doing and she will go for my phone.

    I do appreciate your tips though.


    Sent from my Verizon Samsung Galaxy Note 4
    12-12-2014 01:25 PM
  14. LaTuFu's Avatar
    You bring up some good points but for me, the most critical are spur of the moment indoors shots of my very active toddler. And for that, the 6p is better. If I spent the time to make adjustments then the shot is gone.


    Flash doesn't work for me, because the Flash will distract my daughter from what she is doing and she will go for my phone.

    I do appreciate your tips though.


    Sent from my Verizon Samsung Galaxy Note 4
    Yep, I agree. On spur of the moment shots, I go with flash enabled. It is easier to enhance a clear shot in Snapseed than it is to try to salvage a fuzzy shot.
    12-12-2014 01:38 PM
  15. LaTuFu's Avatar
    Coming from someone who owned the S2, S4, S5 and experience with the Note 4:

    The camera in Samsung devices just suck. They are technically able to take great pictures if you always tap to focus and hold the phone very still with two hands. Doing it any different leads to more or less blurred pictures.
    Impossible to use the camera one handed.

    My sister had the iPhone 4s and now the iPhone 6 and the cameras on both are on a whole different level, simply because the pictures are almost always sharp. No need for tap to focus, no need for two handed use.

    Apple has the shutter speed right, Samsung has it wrong.
    I've never felt that way about the Samsung cameras, especially the S2 and S4 compared to the iPhone 4 and 4s. That camera is nowhere near the capabilities of the S2/S4, and I never found it difficult to get clear shots, even in motion settings. They weren't great for sports/action shots, but up until the Note 4 I haven't seen a camera phone that really was good for that.
    12-12-2014 01:41 PM
  16. jdfry15's Avatar
    Have you tried any other camera apps? On some of my past phones, I think the droid maxx I would use the google camera, camera zoom to get better results. I just came to the note 4 a few weeks ago from the g3. I think the g3 is a better low light camera, but I only use my note outdoors for work normally which the note 4 gives excellent results. I just wonder if it is a software issue or a hardware issue. Low light, motion pictures are always an issue though with any camera in auto modes or without really a really fast prime lens.
    12-12-2014 01:51 PM
  17. LegalAmerican's Avatar
    I'm starting to believe the Note 4 shipped with completely different lenses and/or shutter hardware. Either that, or people on this forum are not being honest. Whenever there's a thread about camera results, some say they never have trouble getting moving objects to be crisp in the shot, yet I can't capture a slug sliding across molasses without it being blurry. I absolutely love this phone and I brag about it all the time, but the camera just has not lived up to the hype in my experience and I got great shots on my S3 back in the day so I don't feel like it's just me (although i'm sure part of it could be).
    12-12-2014 01:57 PM
  18. fragologist's Avatar
    I'm starting to believe the Note 4 shipped with completely different lenses and/or shutter hardware. Either that, or people on this forum are not being honest. Whenever there's a thread about camera results, some say they never have trouble getting moving objects to be crisp in the shot, yet I can't capture a slug sliding across molasses without it being blurry. I absolutely love this phone and I brag about it all the time, but the camera just has not lived up to the hype in my experience and I got great shots on my S3 back in the day so I don't feel like it's just me (although i'm sure part of it could be).
    I second this. I have fenagled the camera settings in so many ways and still end up with blurry night time shots in low light settings. If something or someone is moving extremely fast then I get the blur but I took pic of my wife eating and the slight movement of her hand came out blurry. And there was plenty of indoor lighting. I'm not bashing the phone. ..it is the best out they're in my opinion except for the camera issue.

    I am in the process of making my Note 4 self aware.
    LegalAmerican likes this.
    12-12-2014 02:22 PM
  19. NVNJ's Avatar
    I'd love to hear a response from Samsung regarding this. Or, any review site, AC included, which raves about the camera on the Note 4. Something is most definitely wrong and I sure hope that a software fix can correct it.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    12-12-2014 02:41 PM
  20. Bobbman's Avatar
    I have both the 6Plus and the Note 4. The Note 4 camera is better in almost every situation.....except the low light motion. Even then it is close unless you get into really low light motion then the 6 Plus pulls ahead. But outside, outside motion, in a mall, office, work place etc..-- I am finding the Note 4 camera much better then the 6Plus. Better colors, clarity etc.. Viewing them on the computer and it is even more pronounced. If the ONLY situation you use the camera is for low light with some motion, 6Plus would win. If, however, you are out and about, inside (well lit) outside, sports etc.. The Note 4 takes a much better photo then than the 6Plus. The camera is the most important aspect for me on a cell phone (that being said I will not do a Windows phone). As far as Verizon goes (stuck with them).....it is the best camera phone they offer at the moment. 6Plus will be going on eBay.
    12-12-2014 02:46 PM
  21. Almeuit's Avatar
    I have both the 6Plus and the Note 4. The Note 4 camera is better in almost every situation.....except the low light motion. Even then it is close unless you get into really low light motion then the 6 Plus pulls ahead. But outside, outside motion, in a mall, office, work place etc..-- I am finding the Note 4 camera much better then the 6Plus. Better colors, clarity etc.. Viewing them on the computer and it is even more pronounced. If the ONLY situation you use the camera is for low light with some motion, 6Plus would win. If, however, you are out and about, inside (well lit) outside, sports etc.. The Note 4 takes a much better photo then than the 6Plus. The camera is the most important aspect for me on a cell phone (that being said I will not do a Windows phone). As far as Verizon goes (stuck with them).....it is the best camera phone they offer at the moment. 6Plus will be going on eBay.
    As per others and myself -- motion even in good light blurs. As LegalAmerican said I am starting to think there are various versions of the camera on devices since there are some conflicting reports.
    LegalAmerican likes this.
    12-12-2014 02:50 PM
  22. Bobbman's Avatar
    You do have to keep the camera steady. But if you are steady with ample light, I think the Note 4 takes a great shot. Clear with a lot of clarity and details. The 6Plus can not keep up due to the lack of mega pixels. If I am out side or in good light, I never use the 6Plus camera as I feel I am missing out on how good the Note 4 shot will be!
    12-12-2014 03:18 PM
  23. LaTuFu's Avatar
    I'm starting to believe the Note 4 shipped with completely different lenses and/or shutter hardware. Either that, or people on this forum are not being honest. Whenever there's a thread about camera results, some say they never have trouble getting moving objects to be crisp in the shot, yet I can't capture a slug sliding across molasses without it being blurry. I absolutely love this phone and I brag about it all the time, but the camera just has not lived up to the hype in my experience and I got great shots on my S3 back in the day so I don't feel like it's just me (although i'm sure part of it could be).
    I second this. I have fenagled the camera settings in so many ways and still end up with blurry night time shots in low light settings. If something or someone is moving extremely fast then I get the blur but I took pic of my wife eating and the slight movement of her hand came out blurry. And there was plenty of indoor lighting. I'm not bashing the phone. ..it is the best out they're in my opinion except for the camera issue.

    I am in the process of making my Note 4 self aware.

    And for everyone else posting after this...are you using the flash in these instances? Like I said in earlier posts, the Note 4, in my experience so far, will not "auto" flash in low light situations that a standard DSLR in Auto mode, as well as previous Galaxy devices, would auto flash. So it will most certainly not have a fast shutter speed or a very small f-stop (slow shutter, small aperture number=lots of potential for blur). I get it that the 6+ is doing this in the same circumstances, but I want to set that aside for the moment. I would like to try to answer this "different version" question, too.

    I get blur if I try to capture a motion in low light. But from my photography background, it completely makes sense and so I am not surprised or bothered by it. I'm impressed that the 6+ does it in those situations, more than I am disappointed that the Note 4 does not.

    Just curious if anyone has had different experience getting quality photos by forcing the flash in those low light situations.

    If I get the chance this weekend, I'll play around with my Note 4 and my DSLR and try to get some comparison shots.
    12-12-2014 03:22 PM
  24. LegalAmerican's Avatar
    And for everyone else posting after this...are you using the flash in these instances? Like I said in earlier posts, the Note 4, in my experience so far, will not "auto" flash in low light situations that a standard DSLR in Auto mode, as well as previous Galaxy devices, would auto flash. So it will most certainly not have a fast shutter speed or a very small f-stop (slow shutter, small aperture number=lots of potential for blur). I get it that the 6+ is doing this in the same circumstances, but I want to set that aside for the moment. I would like to try to answer this "different version" question, too.

    I get blur if I try to capture a motion in low light. But from my photography background, it completely makes sense and so I am not surprised or bothered by it. I'm impressed that the 6+ does it in those situations, more than I am disappointed that the Note 4 does not.

    Just curious if anyone has had different experience getting quality photos by forcing the flash in those low light situations.

    If I get the chance this weekend, I'll play around with my Note 4 and my DSLR and try to get some comparison shots.
    It seems like the flash is pretty rare, but i'll mess around with it some to see for sure what it does. I just know that like others have mentioned, most of my photos are of my little girls and having to go through each setting to optimize it perfectly makes me miss the moment. I always thought that was what 'auto mode' was supposed to do for me. If it can't, it needs to have a software fix so that it can. And i'm not just talking about low light situations. I get blur in my shots outside on a sunny day. I don't expect to get award winning photography in Pirates of the Caribbean ride at Disneyland by any means. I just want to see crisp photos in outdoor settings when it's daytime.
    12-12-2014 03:57 PM
  25. LaTuFu's Avatar
    I definitely agree with you on that. It was very frustrating for me initially when I was getting used to this phone. You can set the flash to "always on" in settings and it will stay that way until you change it. Same with some of the other functions, but for now I'm only doing that for spontaneous shots. Just curious to see if this helps anyone at all.

    Also, have you also downloaded the other modes (even if you don't plan to use them) from the Galaxy App store?

    For outdoor shots, I'm finding that if you don't use sport mode for action shots, the other thing to do is burst shots (just hold down the shutter or power key in auto mode to get a burst shot). This will capture a good clear shot for sure outdoors.

    (As a side benefit, if you're uploading your photos to Google+, it will collect burst shots and create an animated shot in your Google+ Pictures gallery, so that is a kinda cool thing if you want to mess around with that.)
    12-12-2014 04:02 PM
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