02-17-2017 01:50 PM
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  1. Barley Singer's Avatar
    It could also be differences in the number of widgets (and apps) she has up & running all the time, as well as differences in any power/battery conservation programs you might have, that she does not have. My PIPO M6 PRO battery life was utter crap. It got *some* better after I turned off : sound, GPS & cell while at home (most of the time - it is a plablet), and also made the screen turn off after 1 minute without use.

    I still did not like the battery drain, so I installed "DU Battery Saver" and suddenly I had a lot more battery time. IMHO the only way they could make that program better would be to add in NFC, so it would automatically adjust the power settings, based on where I am.
    02-23-2015 01:06 AM
  2. Bordcla's Avatar
    Jesus, you have no clue what you are talking about and blatantly misleading people here.

    You completely ignore the laboratory test results with real, precise measurements, and based your false statement on your own " Research, experience with Hobby grade Li-Ion and Li-Po batteries/chargers. "? Jee, with your method, who need science?
    Would you be so kind as to light our lanterns and share links to what science actually has to say on the issue?
    02-23-2015 12:38 PM
  3. natehoy's Avatar
    It is SAFE to leave your battery plugged in as long as you want. Days? Weeks? Months? Sure. Overvoltage circuitry built into the battery will prevent anything bad from happening. The "your battery is charged, please unplug" message is an energy-conserving one, not a safety message. 90% of the laptops here at work stay tethered to a desk 100% of the time, and after 2-3 years of being plugged in continuously the batteries still work. At somewhat diminished capacity, since they have been abused by being kept at 100% for years, but they work. None have exploded. Few need actual replacement, and most probably would have needed replacement under normal daily use anyway.

    Any charge patterns you employ will affect the longevity, good or bad, of the battery long-term. The optimal charge pattern is highly dependent on which specific Lithium technology is used (Lithium Manganese, LIFEPO4, etc etc) and they are all different - which is the root of a lot of the confusion surrounding the care and feeding of "Lithium" batteries - they just ain't all the same. But the net result is that the damage is in the form of a slow, long-term loss in battery capacity, even with the most "abusive" recharge cycles.

    The only way to TRULY kill your battery (without physical modifications to the battery) is to discharge it to the point where the phone shuts down, then let it sit in a drawer for a few months while the BMS finally uses up the trickle charge it needs and the cells silently die. Or charge it while applying a lot of heat so it goes into thermal shutdown.

    Enjoy your phone. Charge it using a pattern that is convenient to you. When the battery doesn't carry the capacity you need, which will be well over a year or three down the road even in the least optimal recharge patterns for your tech, drop 20-25 bucks for a replacement and continue enjoying your phone.

    If you have a phone with a built-in battery, they are generally expensive and difficult to replace. In that case, if you want to keep it for more than three years or so you'll probably want to research the specific Lithium tech used and look up the specifics of managing that battery type, or accept that in three years you'll probably have "wasted" some battery capacity in addition to what was lost due to normal wear-and-tear.

    For the Note 4, just order a new battery in a couple of years. Problem solved.
    mumfoau likes this.
    02-23-2015 01:26 PM
  4. LaTuFu's Avatar
    I'm not going to dispute the points you've posted and really appreciate the time you've spent to help others, but the one time I did leave my note 4 connected to the fast charger overnight I got a notification to disconnect the phone...something to the effect of "battery at 100% disconnect from charger". I have not seen this when connected to my laptop or desktop. I don't think my phone will explode but isn't this some warning from Samsung related to their batteries, perhaps?

    Since then I prefer to charge my phone in the morning as I get ready to leave. It charges up full quickly and doesn't stay on the fast charger past an hour at most.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    Every Samsung phone I've ever had tells you to unplug when the phone reaches 100% charge. It doesn't "hurt" the long term performance of the battery to leave it plugged in.

    I have the same background and experience with LiPo batteries that OP does, and have been saying identical things about batteries in this forum for quite a while.

    I'm on my 5th Samsung device, and countless other smartphones/electronic devices with LiPo battery chemistries. Leaving them plugged in will not put you at additional risk. The batteries are built with protection circuits in place to prevent these kind of problems.
    02-23-2015 03:18 PM
  5. LaTuFu's Avatar
    Jesus, you have no clue what you are talking about and blatantly misleading people here.

    You completely ignore the laboratory test results with real, precise measurements, and based your false statement on your own " Research, experience with Hobby grade Li-Ion and Li-Po batteries/chargers. "? Jee, with your method, who need science?
    On the contrary, the lab results and research I've read supports exactly what OP has stated.

    In addition to my own hands on experience with multi-meters and batteries on similar equipment.

    We're talking simple voltage and current flow here. It's not nuclear physics.
    02-23-2015 03:21 PM
  6. barrettdaniel's Avatar
    The intergalactic rule of sub atomic physics and bio metric laws of algarithms in super microbiology battery technology.......just charge your phone as you want. If the battery dies after 2 years, you're probably buying a new phone by then anyway, if you haven't already! If not, buy a battery for like 15 bucks on amazon! I have no idea why there is so much arguing over such an insignificant issue.
    02-23-2015 03:46 PM
  7. ChemMan's Avatar
    Yea, what he said

    The intergalactic rule of sub atomic physics and bio metric laws of algarithms in super microbiology battery technology.......just charge your phone as you want. If the battery dies after 2 years, you're probably buying a new phone by then anyway, if you haven't already! If not, buy a battery for like 15 bucks on amazon! I have no idea why there is so much arguing over such an insignificant issue.
    02-23-2015 05:52 PM
  8. rong21's Avatar
    I read in a few blogs that leaving your phone plugged in all night causes obesity, hair loss and possibly lactate intolerance...................
    02-23-2015 08:13 PM
  9. BarfingMonkey's Avatar
    Okay, I'm just going to stop charging my phone entirely!
    beh likes this.
    02-23-2015 10:50 PM
  10. BarfingMonkey's Avatar
    Lactate?
    I read in a few blogs that leaving your phone plugged in all night causes obesity, hair loss and possibly lactate intolerance...................
    02-23-2015 10:51 PM
  11. Golfdriver97's Avatar
    Mod note: Please keep things civil.
    02-23-2015 11:37 PM
  12. rong21's Avatar
    Lactate?
    hahahaha, Lactose..........
    02-24-2015 06:12 AM
  13. Haalcyon's Avatar
    I, like many, have left my batteries charging overnight. To no perceivable I'll effect. I'm sure millions, upon millions do the same thing. With a device with removable batteries, the longevity of a ~$50 part is just not even worth thinking about. I've had plenty of devices with sealed batteries and never had any performance/longevity issues with those batteries either.

    IME, contemporary phone batteries provide plenty of longevity. Is this really an issue for others?

    πŸ”‹from the Note 4βœ’ πŸ“’
    02-24-2015 07:21 AM
  14. natehoy's Avatar
    IME, contemporary phone batteries provide plenty of longevity. Is this really an issue for others?
    It depends, as you accurately pointed out in your previous paragraph, on the ability to replace the batteries. You should see how heated these discussions can get on the Moto X forums, where a dead battery means a VERY expensive paperweight.
    02-24-2015 07:40 AM
  15. Haalcyon's Avatar
    It depends, as you accurately pointed out in your previous paragraph, on the ability to replace the batteries. You should see how heated these discussions can get on the Moto X forums, where a dead battery means a VERY expensive paperweight.
    It is one of the reasons I've preferred removable batteries. It means I can rest assured it's not gonna be an issue. I know most don't go through phones like I do but I really feel like it's not going to be a problem in the lifetime of most people's phones (1.5-2 years).

    πŸ”‹from the Note 4βœ’ πŸ“’
    02-24-2015 10:15 AM
  16. natehoy's Avatar
    It is one of the reasons I've preferred removable batteries. It means I can rest assured it's not gonna be an issue. I know most don't go through phones like I do but I really feel like it's not going to be a problem in the lifetime of most people's phones (1.5-2 years).

    from the Note 4βœ’
    True. A lot of it depends on your ownership patterns, but a non-removable battery can have pretty heavy impact on resale value in a couple of years, as well. As you can see from my signature, I'm a "bit" of a phone-hopper myself, but I think I'd heavily avoid a used phone with a glued-in battery.
    02-24-2015 10:21 AM
  17. Haalcyon's Avatar
    ... but I think I'd heavily avoid a used phone with a glued-in battery.
    Me too.

    from theβœ’ Note Pro 12.2 πŸ“’πŸ“‘
    02-24-2015 12:15 PM
  18. Greg P1's Avatar
    If there was an option to keep the phone battery charged to 65%, the battery would last for many years. The lithium battery in the Plug-in Prius hybrid cycles between 40-70% for that very reason; and it's warrantied for 8-10 years (depending on state laws).

    I understand that the "100% charge" level of the Samsung Note 4 is 4.33 volts, and the maximum recommended voltage is 4.2 volts. This means that the battery is getting an over-charge, which gives the phone a longer run-time, at the expense of battery life. This isn't a problem for the marketing department at Samsung, because they sell spare batteries anyway, but for the user who wants the battery to last a good long time, it means difficulty keeping it charged to within the "sweet-spot" of 50-80%, unless you are plugging it in and unplugging constantly.
    05-19-2015 12:45 PM
  19. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    I'm not going to dispute the points you've posted and really appreciate the time you've spent to help others, but the one time I did leave my note 4 connected to the fast charger overnight I got a notification to disconnect the phone...something to the effect of "battery at 100% disconnect from charger". I have not seen this when connected to my laptop or desktop. I don't think my phone will explode but isn't this some warning from Samsung related to their batteries, perhaps?

    Since then I prefer to charge my phone in the morning as I get ready to leave. It charges up full quickly and doesn't stay on the fast charger past an hour at most.

    Posted via the Android Central App
    That notification isn't new, it did that with my N2 when updated and also with my N3.
    05-19-2015 01:43 PM
  20. Wayne Sanders's Avatar
    I have left my s5 on the charger over night, every night since July. And have no battery issues.

    The same with my s3 i had for 2 years with no problems

    Posted via the Android Central App
    As with ever phone I have ever owned.
    05-19-2015 02:10 PM
  21. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    I generally unplug my N4 before falling asleep, but not always. I have kept all of my phones charging all night, except my N4 and never had a problem.
    05-19-2015 03:02 PM
  22. sparksd's Avatar
    If there was an option to keep the phone battery charged to 65%, the battery would last for many years. The lithium battery in the Plug-in Prius hybrid cycles between 40-70% for that very reason; and it's warrantied for 8-10 years (depending on state laws).

    I understand that the "100% charge" level of the Samsung Note 4 is 4.33 volts, and the maximum recommended voltage is 4.2 volts. This means that the battery is getting an over-charge, which gives the phone a longer run-time, at the expense of battery life. This isn't a problem for the marketing department at Samsung, because they sell spare batteries anyway, but for the user who wants the battery to last a good long time, it means difficulty keeping it charged to within the "sweet-spot" of 50-80%, unless you are plugging it in and unplugging constantly.
    But I think the majority of users would take the longer runtime over longer battery life. Nobody (or few) keeps a phone for many years any longer and at any rate, replacement batteries for the Note 4 from 3rd party vendors like Anker are relatively cheap.
    05-19-2015 03:12 PM
  23. Nader Salem's Avatar
    It's safe every time i sleep i keep my note 4 plugged

    Posted via the Android Central App
    05-19-2015 04:09 PM
  24. mumfoau's Avatar
    While it's perfectly safe I still prefer to put some charge on mine, unplug, and fully charge In the AM while I get ready for work
    Kelly Kearns likes this.
    05-19-2015 08:25 PM
  25. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    While it's perfectly safe I still prefer to put some charge on mine, unplug, and fully charge In the AM while I get ready for work
    Generally when I unplug mine before falling asleep, it is between 95-97% when I get ready to leave in the AM.
    05-19-2015 09:57 PM
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