03-04-2015 07:04 PM
26 12
tools
  1. bbmjack's Avatar
    Will exynos note 4 get 64 bit in lollipop update ?
    I've heard about that

    KRASIVA
    03-04-2015 11:00 AM
  2. Golfdriver97's Avatar
    You mean the processor? No. That is a hardware thing.

    From an AOSP M8
    03-04-2015 11:29 AM
  3. MrMLK's Avatar
    You should hope it doesn't, because all 64bit mode will do is slow down your phone a bit.

    All 64bit does is allow your device to address more physical memory by using 64 bit addresses instead of 32 bits ones. Since the Note 4 isn't going to have more memory simply because it got an OS update, you will get no advantages and the disadvantage of your phone having to deal with larger addresses.
    03-04-2015 11:40 AM
  4. MrMLK's Avatar
    You mean the processor? No. That is a hardware thing.
    Isn't the Exynos in the Note 4 a 64bit processor?

    ------------

    I just checked, and it is. (http://www.anandtech.com/show/8537/s...a57a53-arm-soc)

    It would still be a bad idea to enable this for the reasons stated above.
    03-04-2015 11:41 AM
  5. SpookDroid's Avatar
    While the Exynos version IS, in theory, 64-bit capable, nothing official has been said about turning the switch on. Right now it's only working on 32-bit mode and the 64-bit instructions, to the best of my knowledge, are not all there and/or optimized for that use.

    Also, as far as I know, the Lollipop that's hit Exynos Note 4's in Europe DOES NOT turn on 64-bit mode (but I could be wrong on this one, I just haven't seen any 'official' confirmation of it).
    03-04-2015 11:54 AM
  6. MrMLK's Avatar
    Also, as far as I know, the Lollipop that's hit Exynos Note 4's in Europe DOES NOT turn on 64-bit mode (but I could be wrong on this one, I just haven't seen any 'official' confirmation of it).
    I'm sure you are right. Until someone comes out with a phone with more the 4GB of ram, no one is going to turn on 64-bit mode.
    03-04-2015 11:58 AM
  7. SpookDroid's Avatar
    Ummm... Galaxy S6 has only 3GB of RAM and it does come out with 64-bit mode 'active'
    03-04-2015 12:07 PM
  8. MrMLK's Avatar
    Ummm... Galaxy S6 has only 3GB of RAM and it does come out with 64-bit mode 'active'
    Are you sure? I just looked, and while I can find a bunch of sites that describe the chip as being 64bit compatible, I can't find any that say that Lollipop on the S6 will be running in 64 bit mode.
    03-04-2015 12:14 PM
  9. SpookDroid's Avatar
    Yup, although there's no article stating that it's running in 64bit, it's really because it's pretty obvious since this is a) Lollipop, and b) a clearly stated 64-bit chip. The Note 4's Exynos version was listed as 32-bit, not 64.
    Samsung Galaxy S6 and S6 edge specs | Android Central
    Samsung Galaxy Note 4 specs | Android Central
    03-04-2015 12:25 PM
  10. MrMLK's Avatar
    Yup, although there's no article stating that it's running in 64bit, it's really because it's pretty obvious since this is a) Lollipop, and b) a clearly stated 64-bit chip.
    Why would Lollipop make it more likely to be running in 64bit mode? Lollipop runs perfectly fine in 32bit mode. On phones with 4GB of ram or less it actually runs better.

    The processor being 64bit is a marketing advantage, not a technical one. The only way that they will run Android in 64 bit mode is if they decide that there is some marketing advantage that makes up for the small hit to their benchmarks.

    We will know or sure in a month or so, but I'll be very surprised if the S6 is running in 64 bit mode.
    03-04-2015 12:54 PM
  11. SpookDroid's Avatar
    Don't be. It IS running in 64-bit mode. Just like the Nexus. Promise
    Here are a couple of interesting reads:
    http://www.androidcentral.com/why-64...matter-android
    http://www.androidcentral.com/samsun...e-improvements
    03-04-2015 12:56 PM
  12. MrMLK's Avatar
    Weeeeelllll seeeee........

    By the way, I just looked, and I can't find anywhere that says the Nexus 6 is running in 64 bit mode either. It would be surprising if it was, because its got a 32bit chip in it. Or did you mean some other Nexus?
    03-04-2015 12:58 PM
  13. etdoner's Avatar
    Exynos variants are still working in 32 bit mode in lollipop (kernel arch is still armv7). So 64 bit is not usable (with lollipop 5.0.1 at least).

    Posted via the Android Central App
    UJ95x likes this.
    03-04-2015 12:59 PM
  14. UJ95x's Avatar
    Don't be. It IS running in 64-bit mode. Just like the Nexus. Promise
    Here are a couple of interesting reads:
    http://www.androidcentral.com/why-64...matter-android
    http://www.androidcentral.com/samsun...e-improvements
    Which Nexus is running in 64-bit?
    03-04-2015 01:00 PM
  15. SpookDroid's Avatar
    03-04-2015 01:06 PM
  16. MrMLK's Avatar
    That says it is a 64bit processor, but I can't find any place that says that it is using a 64 bit version of Android.
    03-04-2015 01:13 PM
  17. Almeuit's Avatar
    I'm sure you are right. Until someone comes out with a phone with more the 4GB of ram, no one is going to turn on 64-bit mode.
    Ummm... Galaxy S6 has only 3GB of RAM and it does come out with 64-bit mode 'active'
    Are you sure? I just looked, and while I can find a bunch of sites that describe the chip as being 64bit compatible, I can't find any that say that Lollipop on the S6 will be running in 64 bit mode.
    I almost sure it will. Even iPhone does.
    SpookDroid likes this.
    03-04-2015 01:23 PM
  18. SpookDroid's Avatar
    Ummm...again, you won't see any. Lollipop IS meant to support 64bit processors. That's the point.
    This from the Android Developer Description:
    Android 5.0 introduces platform support for 64-bit architectures—used by the Nexus 9's NVIDIA Tegra K1. Optimizations provide larger address space and improved performance for certain compute workloads. Apps written in the Java language run as 64-bit apps automatically—no modifications are needed. If your app uses native code, we’ve extended the NDK to support new ABIs for ARM v8, and x86-64, and MIPS-64.
    Android Lollipop | Android Developers
    UJ95x likes this.
    03-04-2015 01:25 PM
  19. Almeuit's Avatar
    That says it is a 64bit processor, but I can't find any place that says that it is using a 64 bit version of Android.
    Oh also it is used in 64-bit.

    Android Lollipop | Android Developers

    Android 5.0 introduces platform support for 64-bit architectures—used by the Nexus 9's NVIDIA Tegra K1.
    03-04-2015 01:26 PM
  20. natehoy's Avatar
    The technical objections to actually using Android 64 bit for a non-Nexus device still stand. If it doesn't have more than 3GB of RAM and/or isn't running 100% 64-bit compiled code, the hardware thunking layer to run 32-bit instructions in a 64-bit architecture is going to be far more efficient than any software emulation layer that can run 32-bit code in 64-bit instructions.

    I get why the Nexus 9 is running 64-bit - it's a Nexus, and Google needs a referential architecture in 64-bit because 64-bit really does represent the near future of smartphone evolution, and reference devices need to start getting into developer's hands NOW, even if there is no other technical reason for using 64 bits in the Android build

    >3.5GB became necessary in the personal computing world years ago, and you need 64 bits to support addressing that much memory. This transition was anything but smooth and painless, and many corporations are still only offering 32-bit versions of popular desktop OSes. I have a laptop on my desk at work that has 8GB of RAM and an Intel Core i7 architecture, but only 3.5GB RAM are addressable because some of our 32-bit software *STILL* doesn't work in 64-bit glory. So I have a very sad 4.5GB of RAM that just sits there being refreshed by the hardware - billions of sad little electronic pandas that will never do anything, ever.

    Smartphones are VERY FAST approaching the stage where they will need to have 4, 8, or even 16GB of RAM on board to support the workloads we are throwing at them. At least some of them.

    That doesn't mean that any manufacturer of non-Nexus consumer devices has any technical reason to implement a 64-bit build of the OS unless and until they need more than 3GB of RAM on board. Benchmark and real-world performance will be slightly negatively affected. You introduce a whole raft of issues like hardware driver support, software emulation layers for 32-bit software and performance and memory addressing issues with 32 bit-optimized software even if it is compiled to 64 bits.

    There WILL come a day, probably not this year, but very likely next year, when the first batch of phones come out with 4+ GB of RAM. It's important in the meantime to have some reference devices out there to start playing with 64 bit (hence Nexus 9, and probably other Nexii in the near future).

    But the only reason a third party manufacturer would come out with a fully 64-bit-enabled phone with 3GB or less would be for sheer bragging rights. Which isn't to say it's not going to happen - it probably will - but there's absolutely no reason to be clamoring for it until it is needed.
    03-04-2015 02:07 PM
  21. MrMLK's Avatar
    I agree with everything you said. Having said that, I'm not sure who you are quoting here, but

    >3.5GB became necessary in the personal computing world years ago, and you need 64 bits to support addressing that much memory.
    This is incorrect. 32bit processors can address up to 4GB of ram. You only need 32bits for 4GB or less. No phone currently has that much RAM in it, and its going to be a long time before any ppone does.

    >Smartphones are VERY FAST approaching the stage where they will need to have 4, 8, or even 16GB of RAM on board to support the workloads we are throwing at them.
    This is both incorrect, and somewhat silly when you think about it.

    1) Most phones have between 10 and 25 GB of free storage in them when empty. To say that they are rapidly approaching the point where they will need half as much RAM (or more) as they have flash is just crazy.

    2) What workloads do you think people are throwing at them? Most desktops don't need 16GB of ram, even more so, phones don't need even 8. Do you think that people are editing large spreadsheets on their phones? Video editing? Developing large pieces of software? Editing RAW image files? No, most people use their phones primarily for email, surfing the web, media consumption and games. None of those things needs a large amount of memory.
    03-04-2015 02:23 PM
  22. UJ95x's Avatar
    Ah, right. I was thinking of the phones hehe
    03-04-2015 02:24 PM
  23. natehoy's Avatar
    This is incorrect. 32bit processors can address up to 4GB of ram. You only need 32bits for 4GB or less. No phone currently has that much RAM in it, and its going to be a long time before any ppone does.
    I stand corrected - I was referring to "useable" memory after OS overhead was taken out, and didn't clarify the difference between that and "addressable" memory. Thanks for the clarification.

    This is both incorrect, and somewhat silly when you think about it.
    There is no single app or even combination of a few apps in the smartphone world that needs to address more than 4GB RAM, true. However, multitasking is the real use case for more smartphone RAM. As apps start to resemble and even outgrow (because location awareness and mobility means people add features to their apps) their desktop brethren, we'll continue to demand lag-free task swapping between those apps. And "MOAR MEMORY!" is the key to doing that.

    It's either that or have developers all optimize their apps to be more RAM-friendly (I'm in software development - have a developer choose between optimization and making their app shinier and more attractive to users... good luck with that).

    Not to mention, the "games" you refer to are not all small puzzle games. Full-blown immersive 3D desktop games are being ported to larger and larger-screened phones and tablets. The assets on these can measure into the gigabytes, and the more you keep in memory, the less has to be paged in, and the smoother and cleaner an immersive experience you'll get.

    My Galaxy Note 4 is running 1440 x 2560 pixels. My 24" monitor on my work desktop is running 1920 x 2000. Think about that for a moment. My SMARTPHONE is pushing more pixels than one of the larger monitors in the marketplace. Granted my desktop has two other monitors attached (the correct number of monitors for optimal productivity is N+1, where N represents the number you have right now), but my smartphone is what gets games and other stuff loaded to it, and those tend to put a heavier load on a system than even the 5-6 Eclipse instances I have to have open at any given time.
    03-04-2015 02:57 PM
  24. MrMLK's Avatar
    There is no single app or even combination of a few apps in the smartphone world that needs to address more than 4GB RAM, true. However, multitasking is the real use case for more smartphone RAM. As apps start to resemble and even outgrow (because location awareness and mobility means people add features to their apps) their desktop brethren, we'll continue to demand lag-free task swapping between those apps. And "MOAR MEMORY!" is the key to doing that.
    Sure, but when each individual app is only taking up a smallish amount of memory, you still don't need that much memory total. It is the spreadsheets and the graphics editing programs and their like that take a lot of memory, not the email programs and the mobile utilities. Even browsers take up less memory on the phone because you don't have to worry about heavyweight sites on a 6 inch display.

    You are much more limited in your multitasking needs on a 6 inch display, because the odds that you will have more then a few apps active at one time is pretty low. More limited multitasking=lower RAM requirements.

    My Galaxy Note 4 is running 1440 x 2560 pixels. My 24" monitor on my work desktop is running 1920 x 2000. Think about that for a moment. My SMARTPHONE is pushing more pixels than one of the larger monitors in the marketplace..
    Yes, but it isn't really. I know of a couple of games that have 1080p resources, but most are just lower res and scaled up. You desktop games may offer you options to run at full resolution, but none of your phone games do. And that's ok, because on a six inch display, you would be hard pressed to tell the difference anyhow.

    There actually is one exception to this called Battle For Wesnoth. And even it doesn't use higher res resources. It just stops scaling up the standard one. It is (as can be imagined) impossible to play at full resolution.

    No, games on a six inch device are not going to be what pushed us up to 8 or 16gb of ram.
    03-04-2015 03:18 PM
  25. cruz allen's Avatar
    Im on lollipop now with the exynos and the software is 32 bit even though the chip is 64bit capable

    Posted via the Android Central App
    03-04-2015 07:02 PM
26 12

Similar Threads

  1. Set warranty bit: recovery
    By Sbeatly in forum Android 4.4 KitKat
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-01-2016, 05:08 PM
  2. How do I get a bit of headphone out of the jack port?
    By CJMillar91 in forum Samsung Galaxy S5
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-03-2015, 06:21 PM
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 02-27-2015, 09:33 AM
  4. How do I get more than three movies on my 64 gb sd card?
    By AC Question in forum Ask a Question
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-25-2015, 10:58 PM
  5. I use Chrome quite a bit on the N9...
    By systemofadown1 in forum Google Nexus 9
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-21-2015, 02:55 PM
LINK TO POST COPIED TO CLIPBOARD