09-19-2016 04:55 AM
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  1. recDNA's Avatar
    No they don't. IPhones have blown up.
    I said most. Few iphones blow. When they do it may still be a cheap replacement mall battery or like Sammy a bad batch of batteries. Poorly built lithium batteries are time bombs no matter what you do. Using the right hardware won't help.
    09-04-2016 11:01 AM
  2. recDNA's Avatar
    It isn't more common with C it happens with micro.

    C will be the industry standard.
    Apparently. Mores the pity.

    Now if Sammy gave us all usual USB functionality like hardwire hdmi connectivity it might be worth it.
    debdroid1a likes this.
    09-04-2016 11:02 AM
  3. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    I said most. Few iphones blow. When they do it may still be a cheap replacement mall battery or like Sammy a bad batch of batteries. Poorly built lithium batteries are time bombs no matter what you do. Using the right hardware won't help.
    Maybe you need to start a consulting company about this. The experts have been very clear about the cheap cables that don't meet industry standards.

    Some one using the wrong voltage on any item, can blow up. A company can't stop stop people from doing something.

    I can put my mom's phone on my fast charge and if I do that, I could blow the battery.

    I don't do that, she doesn't have a fast charge battery and I only use the correct charger.
    09-04-2016 11:04 AM
  4. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    I said most. Few iphones blow. When they do it may still be a cheap replacement mall battery or like Sammy a bad batch of batteries. Poorly built lithium batteries are time bombs no matter what you do. Using the right hardware won't help.
    That wasn't the problem with the iPhones that blew.
    09-04-2016 11:06 AM
  5. recDNA's Avatar
    I'm not sure I am adequately expressing what good battery protection circuitry should and can do but we have gone WAY OT and should stick to the issue of the topic.

    Will a ton of N7 refurbs show up in the market in the next year or two?
    09-04-2016 11:07 AM
  6. anon(782252)'s Avatar
    I'm not sure I am adequately expressing what good battery protection circuitry should and can do but we have gone WAY OT and should stick to the issue of the topic.

    Will a ton of N7 refurbs show up in the market in the next year or two?
    Samsung is still forecasting to sell 12 million N7's this year so I would guess in a year or two, there will be a lot of refurbs. But pre-recall serial numbers will not show up.
    09-04-2016 11:13 AM
  7. recDNA's Avatar
    Samsung is still forecasting to sell 12 million N7's this year so I would guess in a year or two, there will be a lot of refurbs. But pre-recall serial numbers will not show up.
    So what will be the fate of recalled devices and the parts they are made of?
    09-04-2016 11:16 AM
  8. msm0511's Avatar
    So what will be the fate of recalled devices and the parts they are made of?
    I'm not even sure if Samsung has an answer to that. They could just put em all in a warehouse somewhere for now until they decide what's the best course of action.
    09-04-2016 11:19 AM
  9. recDNA's Avatar
    I'm not even sure if Samsung has an answer to that. They could just put em all in a warehouse somewhere for now until they decide what's the best course of action.
    They probably will.. But if a bunch of refurbs hit ebay in 18 mos we'll know.
    09-04-2016 11:20 AM
  10. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    I'm not even sure if Samsung has an answer to that. They could just put em all in a warehouse somewhere for now until they decide what's the best course of action.
    I still expect recycle for the ones that are used and probably use the parts of ones not used in other phones.
    09-04-2016 11:21 AM
  11. SarahGN's Avatar
    But there is an LCD. I just had mine replaced a couple of weeks ago in my Note 5, which is also AMOLED.
    No they're different technologies. Just google it.
    09-04-2016 11:25 AM
  12. recDNA's Avatar
    I still expect recycle for the ones that are used and probably use the parts of ones not used in other phones.
    And this is the crux of it. Will they recycle a million phones that are perfectly good - just need nee batteries?
    09-04-2016 11:26 AM
  13. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    And this is the crux of it. Will they recycle a million phones that are perfectly good - just need nee batteries?
    I believe they will. I think the risk for outweigh recouping any money. Scrap and recycle it, most of the material is bought for top dollar.
    09-04-2016 11:29 AM
  14. recDNA's Avatar
    We'll see. I suspect op nailed it. Lots of refurbs. At least now Asurion won't have to pawn off S7e as acceptable replacement.
    09-04-2016 11:32 AM
  15. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    If Samsung does that, then they won't be smart business wise at all. I don't think they want another chance with a problem Note 7 and many people wouldn't take it as a replacement.

    If it was made before the date of the new ones, I wouldn't take it either and I trust Samsung to fix them.
    09-04-2016 11:33 AM
  16. recDNA's Avatar
    If Samsung does that, then they won't be smart business wise at all. I don't think they want another chance with a problem Note 7 and many people wouldn't take it as a replacement.

    If it was made before the date of the new ones, I wouldn't take it either and I trust Samsung to fix them.
    If I buy another N7 how will I know date it was built before potentially being stuck with restocking fee?
    09-04-2016 11:41 AM
  17. anon(782252)'s Avatar
    So what will be the fate of recalled devices and the parts they are made of?
    As I've said repeatedly, they take the loss and move on. The money really isn't that big of a deal. Tough decisions are made all the time. Look at Target. They made the decision to close 130 Canada stores at a cost of a $5 billion write off after losing $2 billion over 2 years on Canada operations.

    The other thing to consider is Samsung is only out the actual cost to them of the parts for these devices. That could be as little as $400/ device or less even considering the s7 only had $250 worth of parts.

    At $400, it's a $1 billion write off. Chump change for Samsung in the big picture.
    Kelly Kearns likes this.
    09-04-2016 11:43 AM
  18. anon(782252)'s Avatar
    If I buy another N7 how will I know date it was built before potentially being stuck with restocking fee?
    Look at the date on the box when you pick it up.
    09-04-2016 11:45 AM
  19. recDNA's Avatar
    Look at the date on the box when you pick it up.
    Oh cool. Didn't know itnwas there. So built after x date will be safe?
    X=?
    09-04-2016 11:46 AM
  20. Baby_Doc's Avatar
    As I've said repeatedly, they take the loss and move on. The money really isn't that big of a deal. Tough decisions are made all the time. Look at Target. They made the decision to close 130 Canada stores at a cost of a $5 billion write off after losing $2 billion over 2 years on Canada operations.

    The other thing to consider is Samsung is only out the actual cost to them of the parts for these devices. That could be as little as $400/ device or less even considering the s7 only had $250 worth of parts.

    At $400, it's a $1 billion write off. Chump change for Samsung in the big picture.
    I am amazed that there is even $250 worth of parts in these phones, unless you include research and development costs.
    When you consider a good size Samsung TV can be gotten for the same price as this phone, you wonder how much these phones cost to make.
    09-04-2016 11:55 AM
  21. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    Oh cool. Didn't know itnwas there. So built after x date will be safe?
    X=?
    Yes it should be. Also there is an app developed by someone at XDA for Samsungs that will tell you the date made, where it was made and a lot of info.

    https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...uyen.phoneinfo
    09-04-2016 11:55 AM
  22. ray689's Avatar
    Some people seem to believe this is due to people using cheap or unapproved charging cables. If there truly no issues with the battery and the cause was simply not using the accessories provided, I'm not sure Samsung would go to such a dramatic step as recalling all the devices. There is a bigger issue at play here.
    recDNA likes this.
    09-04-2016 11:57 AM
  23. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    Right this recall issue is about the battery alone. The 24 cases out of 35, I'm guessing they only used Samsung or chargers/cables that were proven good.
    09-04-2016 12:00 PM
  24. anon(782252)'s Avatar
    I am amazed that there is even $250 worth of parts in these phones, unless you include research and development costs.
    When you consider a good size Samsung TV can be gotten for the same price as this phone, you wonder how much these phones cost to make.
    I think the article about the s7 for cost of parts was from April or May, pretty close after launch as that would have only gone down as months progressed. At the time, the SD 820 was the most expensive part at $64. That has certainly come down.

    Manufacturing, labor, advertising make up the majority cost of almost any electronics.
    Kelly Kearns likes this.
    09-04-2016 01:01 PM
  25. anon(782252)'s Avatar
    Oh cool. Didn't know itnwas there. So built after x date will be safe?
    X=?
    Not sure what x= just yet. Somewhere around recall announcement day I would guess.
    09-04-2016 01:02 PM
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