09-08-2016 11:13 AM
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  1. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    Replacing all Note 7s is the right thing to do and my confidence in Samsung shot way up.
    Yeah I'm still angry with Samsung, they have promised me a lot and not yet come through yet.. Which there are good reasons for that. However the way they are handling this is seriously impressive and no one will ever see an issue handled this way in any industry.
    sydneycooper1979 likes this.
    09-04-2016 10:19 AM
  2. dadathepanda's Avatar
    They don't need to do anything to regain confidence of the customers. These things happen and if I were in the market for a Note 7, I would get it.
    09-04-2016 10:21 AM
  3. Baby_Doc's Avatar
    Replacing all Note 7s is the right thing to do and my confidence in Samsung shot way up.
    Wouldn't you have had even more confidence in Samsung, had they not had this problem to begin with? I can't see how having such a serious safety problem can help Samsung's image, no matter how quickly they attempt to fix the problem.

    Any cell phone is a potential time bomb because of lithium batteries. A first priority is to be sure all safeguards are present and working correctly, before putting these phones in the consumer's hands. IMO, more people will think Samsung slipped up here with quality safeguards than have a higher opinion of them for owning up to the problem.

    We'll see which opinion prevails by how sales of this phone is effected.
    DaleReeck#AC likes this.
    09-04-2016 10:27 AM
  4. jamesrick80's Avatar
    Give us complimentary 6 gb ram...i will forever stay silent
    09-04-2016 10:29 AM
  5. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    Wouldn't you have had even more confidence in Samsung, had they not had this problem to begin with? I can't see how having such a serious safety problem can help Samsung's image, no matter how quickly they attempt to fix the problem.

    Any cell phone is a potential time bomb because of lithium batteries. A first priority is to be sure all safeguards are present and working correctly, before putting these phones in the consumer's hands. IMO, more people will think Samsung slipped up here with quality safeguards than have a higher opinion of them for owning up to the problem.

    We'll see which opinion prevails by how sales of this phone is effected.
    A contractor, that employees humans, screwed up.

    That happens.
    Gray Area likes this.
    09-04-2016 10:38 AM
  6. Baby_Doc's Avatar
    A contractor, that employees humans, screwed up.

    That happens.
    Yes it does. Would you tolerate that it just happens, if it was the seat belts or airbags in our cars that were defective? Safety is a priority for cars and phones and should be expected, beyond any beyond bell or whistle.

    It remains to be seen if just the battery contractor was at fault. Many are suggesting that the protective circuitry may also be faulty. If any of these faults resulted in our personal injury, I doubt we would just say that these things just happen. We would complain there was negligence, if we could.
    09-04-2016 11:00 AM
  7. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    Wouldn't you have had even more confidence in Samsung, had they not had this problem to begin with? I can't see how having such a serious safety problem can help Samsung's image, no matter how quickly they attempt to fix the problem.

    Any cell phone is a potential time bomb because of lithium batteries. A first priority is to be sure all safeguards are present and working correctly, before putting these phones in the consumer's hands. IMO, more people will think Samsung slipped up here with quality safeguards than have a higher opinion of them for owning up to the problem.

    We'll see which opinion prevails by how sales of this phone is effected.
    Only thing I can say is that at some point, companies will have to endure this nightmare in some shape or form.

    I hold Samsung to a high standard in terms of quality, so seeing this happen is disappointing to me. However, the way Samsung has handled it has actually alleviated quite a bit of my concerns.

    Sure, they could have done so for the interest of their reputation and to avoid big lawsuits and whatnot, but the thing is, they did the right thing. They acknowledged that something is seriously wrong with their phone that could pose a safety hazard to users and stopped selling the device. They could have just blamed it on bad cables or they could've just recalled suspect units, but they didn't. It's not really the action, but how soon they responded that I think should be given credit. They didn't wait for government intervention. They did so voluntarily.

    Eventually, a company will have to conduct either product updates or recalls at some point. It's their response to such matters that really show a company's true image.
    theshaz, dsignori and Laura Knotek like this.
    09-04-2016 11:03 AM
  8. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    Yes it does. Would you tolerate that it just happens, if it was the seat belts or airbags in our cars that were defective? Safety is a priority for cars and phones and should be expected, beyond any beyond bell or whistle.

    It remains to be seen if just the battery contractor was at fault. Many are suggesting that the protective circuitry may also be faulty. If any of these faults resulted in our personal injury, I doubt we would just say that these things just happen. We would complain there was negligence, if we could.
    We have tolerated airbags and seat belts and even brakes and they fix it.
    Gray Area likes this.
    09-04-2016 11:07 AM
  9. theshaz's Avatar
    You're good to go.
    We'll let you know when a replacement Samsung Galaxy Note7
    is available

    I am all set. I will continue to use and enjoy the Note 7 I have and will swap out when T Mobile has the new ones in stock.

    Kudoes to Samsung & T-Mobile, as painless as possible.
    09-04-2016 11:14 AM
  10. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    I thought I'd throw this out.

    Remember the recall GM did recently when it came to faulty ignition switches? When people found out that GM actually did know all about the issue for years but never recalled them until much later (when fatalities have already occurred), GM's public image was pretty much a goner at that point. Sure, some of GM's recent cars are appealing (I want that 'Vette Z06), but in the public eye, GM's public image has already been tarnished, far beyond what it would've been if they recalled them way earlier when they first knew about it.

    Will Samsung's image be shaken by this recall? Absolutely, but it could have been a lot worse had they not do what they have done. If Samsung just ignored it and had more Notes blow up out there, even causing some harm, Samsung would be hit with much more than just some doubt and a loss in market value.
    09-04-2016 11:16 AM
  11. anon(782252)'s Avatar
    I thought I'd throw this out.

    Remember the recall GM did recently when it came to faulty ignition switches? When people found out that GM actually did know all about the issue for years but never recalled them until much later (when fatalities have already occurred), GM's public image was pretty much a goner at that point. Sure, some of GM's recent cars are appealing (I want that 'Vette Z06), but in the public eye, GM's public image has already been tarnished, far beyond what it would've been if they recalled them way earlier when they first knew about it.

    Will Samsung's image be shaken by this recall? Absolutely, but it could have been a lot worse had they not do what they have done. If Samsung just ignored it and had more Notes blow up out there, even causing some harm, Samsung would be hit with much more than just some doubt and a loss in market value.
    And yet, thru August, GM car sales are up 1%, highest of any major car maker. People forgive and or forget very quickly.
    Gray Area likes this.
    09-04-2016 11:25 AM
  12. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    The thing with manufacturing, they strive to stop human error, but the problem is, humans are involved even if robots are used on the line.

    Human error is not something that will ever disappear. Now when you talk about negligence, intentional, error but you know and you hide it and cover it up.. That is a different matter.
    BustA Groove likes this.
    09-04-2016 11:27 AM
  13. anon(782252)'s Avatar
    Yes it does. Would you tolerate that it just happens, if it was the seat belts or airbags in our cars that were defective? Safety is a priority for cars and phones and should be expected, beyond any beyond bell or whistle.

    It remains to be seen if just the battery contractor was at fault. Many are suggesting that the protective circuitry may also be faulty. If any of these faults resulted in our personal injury, I doubt we would just say that these things just happen. We would complain there was negligence, if we could.
    Americans tolerate safety issues in the food we eat on almost a daily basis. If we didn't, we would all be growing our own food.
    09-04-2016 11:27 AM
  14. soldier45's Avatar
    No issues with mine but will replace just for safety reasons in a week or so. Dedicated lifelong Samsung supporter, they make the best Tvs, phones and SSD hard drives.
    09-04-2016 11:29 AM
  15. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    And yet, thru August, GM car sales are up 1%, highest of any major car maker. People forgive and or forget very quickly.
    Yeah, some people are more forgiving than others.

    But yeah. After all the info got out, it wasn't uncommon to see people laughing and making jokes about GM (and not in a good way)
    09-04-2016 11:30 AM
  16. glenninduluth's Avatar
    For me, they don't need to do anything to regain my confidence. My N7 has worked perfect from day one. No battery issues, no lag issues, not a single scratch, or anything else. Just like every Samsung phone I have had before (and there have been a lot of them!). I can't say that for any of the HTC phones or even the one iPhone I had. all of them had an issue of some kind. Plus, they are being upfront and tackling this issue (an issue that any electronics maker could have) head on. I'll swap mine out and move on like nothing happened. No lost confidence for me in Samsung or the N7.
    The Phone Company likes this.
    09-04-2016 11:33 AM
  17. Baby_Doc's Avatar
    Americans tolerate safety issues in the food we eat on almost a daily basis. If we didn't, we would all be growing our own food.
    Chipotle still hasn't recovered from the E.Coli that plagued many of their outlets. We do forgive, but it sometimes doesnt happen so quickly.

    When it comes to the N7, there will be newer flagship phones becoming available, long before the N7 returns to the marketplace. That will affect future N7 sales in some way. (You just don't crank out 2 million replacement units in a few days or get them back where they need to be in the distribution chain overnight.)

    Again, sales numbers will eventually say how quick we are to forgive.
    09-04-2016 11:42 AM
  18. jerrycau123's Avatar
    I currently own the note 7 and I will wait for the replacement.
    I love the note 7! In my opinion this is an amazing phone!
    I have the option to switch to another phone but! Apple phones are sooooo boring!...
    I though about the perfect phone.. The Nexus P... you know what the letter P stands for, is PERFECT! I heard the camera has issues?..
    09-04-2016 11:44 AM
  19. msm0511's Avatar
    I'm honestly no more or less confident with Samsung than before I got the Note 7. I've been happy with the device so far and understand problems arise from time to time. This is my first Note and first Samsung smartphone. I was never particularly impressed with Samsung until the Note 7 came out. It seemed like a good overall package so I bought it. If they handle the replacements well I'll be happy. I don't see myself less likely to buy another Samsung phone again. Nor do I think I'd be more likely. When it comes to Android I'm fairly neutral OEM wise.

    Now, throwing in Samsung Protection Plus with one free replacement and I'd definitely be more likely to become a regular customer. However, I'm not expecting it or one of those demanding compensation. It'd be a show of good faith though.
    BustA Groove likes this.
    09-04-2016 12:03 PM
  20. trucksmoveamerica#AC's Avatar
    They don't need to do anything. I've been using Samsung notes since note 2 and my wife has been using the s series since the s3 with no issues. The note 7 had issues with parts they used and they are taking care of it, and giving gift cards/bill credits, most manufactures don't give gift cards for your inconvenience for a recall. What more does anyone want??
    09-04-2016 12:17 PM
  21. sydneycooper1979's Avatar
    Wouldn't you have had even more confidence in Samsung, had they not had this problem to begin with? I can't see how having such a serious safety problem can help Samsung's image, no matter how quickly they attempt to fix the problem.

    Any cell phone is a potential time bomb because of lithium batteries. A first priority is to be sure all safeguards are present and working correctly, before putting these phones in the consumer's hands. IMO, more people will think Samsung slipped up here with quality safeguards than have a higher opinion of them for owning up to the problem.

    We'll see which opinion prevails by how sales of this phone is effected.
    Well sure avoiding error would be preferable. But mistakes happen, and I appreciate Samsung handling it this way.
    Kelly Kearns likes this.
    09-04-2016 12:37 PM
  22. Tabbiel1989's Avatar
    I feel like Samsung owning up and putting customer safety above the profits is the best thing they can do.

    As long as I can exchange my blue note 7 for a safe blue note 7 I'll be very happy. o
    Gray Area likes this.
    09-04-2016 12:44 PM
  23. cardboard60's Avatar
    Oh I wonder if the color choices might get messed up with us and having to take what colors that they have available.
    Know they didn't have any Golds one.
    Think China got those.
    And there was limited Blue ones.

    Gonna have to wait and see.
    09-04-2016 12:48 PM
  24. anon(782252)'s Avatar
    Yeah, some people are more forgiving than others.

    But yeah. After all the info got out, it wasn't uncommon to see people laughing and making jokes about GM (and not in a good way)
    Oh I agree. Plenty of people will and are laughing at Samsung. That's human nature. But just like GM is showing recovery, Samsung will do the same IMO.
    Gray Area likes this.
    09-04-2016 01:12 PM
  25. anon(782252)'s Avatar
    Chipotle still hasn't recovered from the E.Coli that plagued many of their outlets. We do forgive, but it sometimes doesnt happen so quickly.

    When it comes to the N7, there will be newer flagship phones becoming available, long before the N7 returns to the marketplace. That will affect future N7 sales in some way. (You just don't crank out 2 million replacement units in a few days or get them back where they need to be in the distribution chain overnight.)

    Again, sales numbers will eventually say how quick we are to forgive.
    Samsung has already revised forecasted sales from 14 million to 12 million units for 2016. They are intimately aware of the short term impact. But the way they are handling it will provide them long term stability.

    I wasn't necessarily referring to Chipotle. I was talking about consumable food as a whole. If you don't grow it yourself, then you are inherently taking chances every time you take a bite. Food recalls happen all the time but only the biggest ones actually get media attention.
    09-04-2016 01:18 PM
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