09-08-2016 11:13 AM
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  1. toenail_flicker's Avatar
    Sammy will be just fine. And so will we. And everyone who really wants a Note 7.
    Extremely well said. All of it. Every word. And very true.
    09-04-2016 09:33 PM
  2. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    Remember how Samsung is known for taking shots at Apple in marketing its phones? Even though it would be tacky and totally out of character, I think it would be funny to see Apple mention something about batteries with its iPhone 7.
    I wouldn't want them to do that, though.

    It makes it look as if they're making fun of the misery of others for the sake of advertising and sales, which is never cool.
    09-04-2016 10:00 PM
  3. Law2138's Avatar
    I wouldn't want them to do that, though.

    It makes it look as if they're making fun of the misery of others for the sake of advertising and sales, which is never cool.
    True. Never looked at it that way. It is unfortunate, and I hope no one gets hurt or experiences a loss by a faulty battery. BTW, Samsung has removed advertisement of the Note 7 on their site. It can be found by searching though.
    09-04-2016 10:08 PM
  4. jabloomf1230's Avatar
    They are not doing it for your safety. They are doing to prevent lawsuits in case someone gets hurt and for damage control to save their name.
    Absolutely. Out of 2.5M phones only a few dozen "caught fire". The risk to the consumer is very small, but the risk to the company is very high. This fiasco is a consequence of bigger hi res screens and the non-removable battery needed to keep it running.
    09-04-2016 10:10 PM
  5. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    True. Never looked at it that way. It is unfortunate, and I hope no one gets hurt or experiences a loss by a faulty battery. BTW, Samsung has removed advertisement of the Note 7 on their site. It can be found by searching though.
    It would probably be best that Samsung focus their attention on resolving this issue and ensuring that customers get their replacements in the least inconvenient way possible before refocusing their efforts on selling them and also restoring consumer confidence.
    09-04-2016 10:14 PM
  6. Law2138's Avatar
    It would probably be best that Samsung focus their attention on resolving this issue and ensuring that customers get their replacements in the least inconvenient way possible before refocusing their efforts on selling them and also restoring consumer confidence.
    Agreed, because it's the current owners that share their experiences with others. They'll be the ones that comment on the device and speak to what Samsung has done to right the issue. Once the new stock is back with the carriers and retail locations, the sales staff will need to reassure potential buyers that the issue no longer exists. I would expect staff to be specifically trained/educated on how to answer questions about the battery issue.
    D13H4RD2L1V3 likes this.
    09-04-2016 10:26 PM
  7. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    Agreed, because it's the current owners that share their experiences with others. They'll be the ones that comment on the device and speak to what Samsung has done to right the issue. Once the new stock is back with the carriers and retail locations, the sales staff will need to reassure potential buyers that the issue no longer exists. I would expect staff to be specifically trained/educated on how to answer questions about the battery issue.
    Absolutely. That's how Samsung should resolve it, and they seem to be doing that.
    Law2138 likes this.
    09-04-2016 10:37 PM
  8. Blues Fan's Avatar
    What would really be ironic is for the many of us who are keeping our Notes until the news ones come in is if they lower the price on them soon once they go back on sale.
    09-04-2016 11:05 PM
  9. sweetypie31's Avatar
    I'm in TX too and the Blue Bell recall was a huge deal. And you couldn't get it anywhere. It was the right call, but phew. I love that ice cream.
    I think I was the only Texan not going crazy over the blue bell recall. Lol Seriously I agree that was a huge recall . Blue bell lost a lot and many people who depended on the work from the factory lost as well. If blue bell could come back from that then Samsung will be fine.
    sydneycooper1979 likes this.
    09-05-2016 02:35 AM
  10. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    I think I was the only Texan not going crazy over the blue bell recall. Lol Seriously I agree that was a huge recall . Blue bell lost a lot and many people who depended on the work from the factory lost as well. If blue bell could come back from that then Samsung will be fine.
    We dealt with it here in Alabama. We had the only plant running for a few months
    09-05-2016 02:43 AM
  11. sweetypie31's Avatar
    For those talking about Samsung only did a recall because they don't want to get sued. You could be correct about that, but why does that matter? I don't care about their reasons for doing the recall. I care that they immediately recalled the device and didnt wait for months to do it or wait for more phones to explode before they took action.
    sydneycooper1979 likes this.
    09-05-2016 02:50 AM
  12. anon(9419666)'s Avatar
    It is very difficult of them to regain consumer confidence in the short term, but after some time people will forget about it.
    09-05-2016 03:10 AM
  13. Baby_Doc's Avatar
    Agreed, because it's the current owners that share their experiences with others. They'll be the ones that comment on the device and speak to what Samsung has done to right the issue. Once the new stock is back with the carriers and retail locations, the sales staff will need to reassure potential buyers that the issue no longer exists. I would expect staff to be specifically trained/educated on how to answer questions about the battery issue.
    Samsung, according to Consumer Reports, failed in the US to go through the Consumer Product Safety Commission before issuing the recall. The Consumer Product Safety Commision, a government organization having nothing to do with Samsung or Consumer Reports,, would insure that any safety issues are fixed in replacements. These issues may go beyond the faulty battery, reported to the public.

    My confidence in Samsung and the N7 would be completely restored if this impartial government organization was overseeing the exchange. Furthermore, if warnings were necessary to immediately stop using the non exchanged phones, this commission would insure this happens.

    While Samsung deserves credit for owning up to producing some faulty phones and recalling all the N7's, I agree with Consumer Reports. Samsung needs to do more to insure customer saftey and confidence, by allowing the CPSC to supervise the recall and exchange for a safe phone.

    While most of us trust that Samsung could continue to do this exchange themselves, it would be reassuring to others that Samsung is allowing this independent oversight. Besides, that's the law in the U.S. that Samsung does it this way.
    09-05-2016 03:22 AM
  14. Roman Akert's Avatar
    Heavy discounts on new prices.

    Let's face it, this will have implications on second hand values too.

    Come resell time folks will want proof that the phone in question is safe ie. not first generation.

    I forsee problems.
    09-05-2016 03:57 AM
  15. freedomx20a's Avatar
    There will be no price drop.

    No fire sale
    Lol

    Maybe next year when now 8 comes out.

    Demand is extremely high for note 7. Much higher then sammy ever dreamed
    09-05-2016 04:54 AM
  16. freedomx20a's Avatar
    Agreed, because it's the current owners that share their experiences with others. They'll be the ones that comment on the device and speak to what Samsung has done to right the issue. Once the new stock is back with the carriers and retail locations, the sales staff will need to reassure potential buyers that the issue no longer exists. I would expect staff to be specifically trained/educated on how to answer questions about the battery issue.
    It will be "oh these are the new all new fresh batteries, no worries". Then customer will say ok cool !
    09-05-2016 04:57 AM
  17. BlackZeppelin's Avatar
    I think Samsung has to rethink strategy of rushing a phone to release before the next iPhone. Think about all the combining factors of the Note 7. You have a major innovation like the iris scanner. You have the technical difficulty of waterproofing a device with an S Pen. You are producing exclusively a curved display.

    And on top of that, you aim to release it almost 2 months before the iPhone. Something has to give. This is far too much technical innovation to be rushed into production.

    The battery issue was the most serious by far but there were other issues. Easily scratched glass, inconsistent performance, random reboots etc.

    Samsung's strategy backfired badly. Next time, take more time before release. If that means coming out the same time as a new iPhone or even a bit later, then so be it.
    09-05-2016 06:01 AM
  18. Roman Akert's Avatar
    There will be no price drop.

    No fire sale
    Lol

    Maybe next year when now 8 comes out.

    Demand is extremely high for note 7. Much higher then sammy ever dreamed
    Maybe before the combustion scare, not any more 😆

    My guess is many will go S7E or iPhone 7
    09-05-2016 06:57 AM
  19. D13H4RD2L1V3's Avatar
    Well, if you need something to give you confidence, this will.

    "After the Galaxy Note 7 battery fiasco, Samsung Electronics has decided to temporarily stop using batteries from Samsung SDI in the Galaxy Note 7. This news comes straight out of the company’s homeland South Korea. Various analysts predict that the Galaxy Note 7 recall could cost Samsung as much as $1 billion.

    Samsung SDI provides around 70 percent of batteries used in the Galaxy Note 7. The rest of them are supplied by Chinese battery manufacturer ATL. After reports of explosions in multiple Galaxy Note 7 units due to faulty batteries, Samsung had to recall over two million units.

    Samsung is expected to increase the order of battery units from ATL for the rest of the Galaxy Note 7 devices. Samsung SDI stock price has dropped 2.76 percent after reports of faulty batteries. Samsung SDI reportedly started developing non-removable batteries back in 2014 but failed to offer the required number of units for the Galaxy S6 as rivals ATL and LG Chemicals fared better in supplying the stock."
    Source: Batteries from Samsung SDI won’t be used in the Galaxy Note 7 temporarily - SamMobile

    In short, most Note7s out there (ones you and I all have) use batteries made by Samsung SDI. Apparently, those batteries are the ones combusting. China's Note7s use a different battery, one made by ATL, which is apparently unfazed by this incident. As a result, until Samsung SDI is able to rectify any faults with their manufacturing process, the first few batches of the post-recall Note7s will feature batteries made by ATL.
    Jona005 and sweetypie31 like this.
    09-05-2016 07:18 AM
  20. Baby_Doc's Avatar
    I think Samsung has to rethink strategy of rushing a phone to release before the next iPhone. Think about all the combining factors of the Note 7. You have a major innovation like the iris scanner. You have the technical difficulty of waterproofing a device with an S Pen. You are producing exclusively a curved display.

    And on top of that, you aim to release it almost 2 months before the iPhone. Something has to give. This is far too much technical innovation to be rushed into production.

    The battery issue was the most serious by far but there were other issues. Easily scratched glass, inconsistent performance, random reboots etc.

    Samsung's strategy backfired badly. Next time, take more time before release. If that means coming out the same time as a new iPhone or even a bit later, then so be it.
    I really don't think the N7 was rushed to market. First of all the last Note was released around the same time last year. So it is on its usual annual schedule like most other phones. Furthermore, except for the iris scanner, most of the new technology was carried forward into the N7 from the S7E released last spring, the only major difference being making the N7 water resistant with its spen opening. While that couldn't be so simply accomplished, Samsung did that very well.

    What is most disturbing about the battery issue is there is no new technology going on here. Safeguards against battery malfunction or mal charging, perhaps, didn't work they way they should. This should be fundamental old technology. Why it went wrong could be the result of faulty materials, or just a faulty battery contractors, but certainly not because of some new design, unless corners were cut in an old design. I doubt the latter, but hopefully, assuming the Consumer Product Safety Commision gets involved, we may eventually know everything that went wrong.
    debdroid1a likes this.
    09-05-2016 07:25 AM
  21. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    Samsung, according to Consumer Reports, failed in the US to go through the Consumer Product Safety Commission before issuing the recall. The Consumer Product Safety Commision, a government organization having nothing to do with Samsung or Consumer Reports,, would insure that any safety issues are fixed in replacements. These issues may go beyond the faulty battery, reported to the public.

    My confidence in Samsung and the N7 would be completely restored if this impartial government organization was overseeing the exchange. Furthermore, if warnings were necessary to immediately stop using the non exchanged phones, this commission would insure this happens.

    While Samsung deserves credit for owning up to producing some faulty phones and recalling all the N7's, I agree with Consumer Reports. Samsung needs to do more to insure customer saftey and confidence, by allowing the CPSC to supervise the recall and exchange for a safe phone.

    While most of us trust that Samsung could continue to do this exchange themselves, it would be reassuring to others that Samsung is allowing this independent oversight. Besides, that's the law in the U.S. that Samsung does it this way.
    And why would it take this to restore your confidence?

    This is a voluntary recall, this group is when people do not take care of consumers, like Toyota didn't. This is for when they have to be forced into a recall.

    Exactly what tells you that the government getting involved is going to help things? Samsung is doing the exchange quicker than our government could have done. Now when they exchange is done, then they can issue a recall to stop all sales by individuals.

    If you need the US government to restore your confidence in Samsung, then you won't restore your confidence. Samsung is going above and beyond the US government.
    soulsmilen likes this.
    09-05-2016 09:40 AM
  22. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    I think Samsung has to rethink strategy of rushing a phone to release before the next iPhone. Think about all the combining factors of the Note 7. You have a major innovation like the iris scanner. You have the technical difficulty of waterproofing a device with an S Pen. You are producing exclusively a curved display.

    And on top of that, you aim to release it almost 2 months before the iPhone. Something has to give. This is far too much technical innovation to be rushed into production.

    The battery issue was the most serious by far but there were other issues. Easily scratched glass, inconsistent performance, random reboots etc.

    Samsung's strategy backfired badly. Next time, take more time before release. If that means coming out the same time as a new iPhone or even a bit later, then so be it.
    I keep hearing about this rush..

    Anyone have a cite for that?

    The Note 7, released 8/19/2016.

    The Note 5, released 8/21/2015.

    Where is the rush?
    09-05-2016 09:43 AM
  23. Aquila's Avatar
    I keeps hearing about this rush..

    Anyone have a cite for that?

    The Note 7, released 8/19/2016.

    The Note 5, released 8/21/2015.

    Where is the rush?
    There is no "rush" other than the normal annual cycle that they're aiming for. The Note 7 probably began its design/production cycle in mid to late 2015 and was no more rushed than any other particular device made on a deadline. Maybe the feeling is that phones ought to be made to release every two years, instead of annually?
    Kelly Kearns likes this.
    09-05-2016 09:54 AM
  24. cardboard60's Avatar
    Samsung, according to Consumer Reports, failed in the US to go through the Consumer Product Safety Commission before issuing the recall. The Consumer Product Safety Commision, a government organization having nothing to do with Samsung or Consumer Reports,, would insure that any safety issues are fixed in replacements. These issues may go beyond the faulty battery, reported to the public.

    My confidence in Samsung and the N7 would be completely restored if this impartial government organization was overseeing the exchange. Furthermore, if warnings were necessary to immediately stop using the non exchanged phones, this commission would insure this happens.

    While Samsung deserves credit for owning up to producing some faulty phones and recalling all the N7's, I agree with Consumer Reports. Samsung needs to do more to insure customer saftey and confidence, by allowing the CPSC to supervise the recall and exchange for a safe phone.

    While most of us trust that Samsung could continue to do this exchange themselves, it would be reassuring to others that Samsung is allowing this independent oversight. Besides, that's the law in the U.S. that Samsung does it this way.
    If I was a company and I didn't have to.
    I wouldn't want to have to pay Consumer Product Safety.
    The Government can't even govern itself or the people working in the Government.
    Look at Hilary and what they have let her get away with.

    Also Don't know else if better qualified than the carriers to do the exchanges, and transferring everything on the phones over.
    Here Samsung only has places in Best Buy. And Samsung has even been taking a lot of Samsung Booths out of Best Buy lately.

    If the battery was the problem and they are issuing new Note 7 with new batteries. That is great.
    I would wish that they put the 6gb ram memory that was originally stated in the lies that was out that China got.
    And I think China got the Faster processors too. That would also be nice.
    toenail_flicker likes this.
    09-05-2016 09:55 AM
  25. climb's Avatar
    My note 7 and s2 working 100%, love em! They had a few battery issues and are making it right for the customer. What more can ya ask for?
    Sammie has moved swiftly, transparently and openly - the Note 7 received strong reviews and was ahead of sales forecasts. The company has done and is doing everything it can, and should.

    The Samsung response will be a template for case studies in business schools and corporate board rooms for years to come.
    greenplumber likes this.
    09-05-2016 09:57 AM
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