09-08-2016 11:13 AM
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  1. ThrottleJohnny's Avatar
    I never complained about the plastic back because I don't see it and it doesn't dent. I have two Notes with plastic backs and removable batteries. Love both. Love my N7 too. If it came with a plastic back I would be happier. I have to pay even more for insurance now just to have that extra bit of protection. Because this is my business phone it's a deduction, but rather not have to pay for it to begin with.
    There's got to be a happy medium here. Doesn't have to be one extreme or the other.
    09-05-2016 01:12 PM
  2. Baby_Doc's Avatar
    It wouldn't seem like they're allowing oversight though. It would seem like oversight is being imposed on them and they can't take responsibility. It may make you feel better, but I'm fairly confident that it would lower Samsung's standing. And it would make it slower, as then this independent body would have to take steps to ensure certain things before it could go on sale, which would take an indeterminate amount of time.
    Of course we can disagree and I respect your opinion. However,
    Samsung has already lost some standing in Consumer Reports eyes by not reporting the recall to the CPSC. Consumer Reports is a non for profit independent consumer advocate. Their criticism of the way Samsung is handling the recall can mean a lot to their readers, who don't necessarily own a Samsung product, like most of us do. Samsung's image with CRs readership, many potentially new customers, will be more adversely effected than with the people on this forum who are loyal Samsung owners.

    The fear of slowing down the exchange is understandable. At the same time, if Samsung cranks out the replacements too quickly, and there are problems with these, what has been gained? Hopefully, the CPSC will insure it is done right, not that I am worried Samsung can't do it without them.

    Besides complying with the law by reporting to the CPSC, Samsung's reputation with the general public, not just us here on AC, stands more to gain than lose at this point, I think.
    09-05-2016 01:19 PM
  3. Baby_Doc's Avatar
    There's got to be a happy medium here. Doesn't have to be one extreme or the other.
    Well, Motorola figured out how to do that with the Z force. They put a plastic layer over the glass and guarantee it against breakage. Unfortunately, the plastic scratches easily, but I suppose it's possible to polish out some superficial scratches.

    Still, I would rather own a Note.
    toenail_flicker likes this.
    09-05-2016 01:26 PM
  4. 1213 1213's Avatar
    Of course we can disagree and I respect your opinion. However,
    Samsung has already lost some standing in Consumer Reports eyes by not reporting the recall to the CPSC. Consumer Reports is a non for profit independent consumer advocate. Their criticism of the way Samsung is handling the recall can mean a lot to their readers, who don't necessarily own a Samsung product, like most of us do. Samsung's image with CRs readership, many potentially new customers, will be more adversely effected than with the people on this forum who are loyal Samsung owners.

    The fear of slowing down the exchange is understandable. At the same time, if Samsung cranks out the replacements too quickly, and there are problems with these, what has been gained? Hopefully, the CPSC will insure it is done right, not that I am worried Samsung can't do it without them.

    Besides complying with the law by reporting to the CPSC, Samsung's reputation with the general public, not just us here on AC, stands more to gain than lose at this point, I think.
    Cr's readership means nothing in the face of Samsung being imposed by a national authority to recall all of their Galaxy note 7's. It just isn't comparable. Being slowed down by bureaucracy wouldn't help people wanting their devices, and would harm Samsung in the face of the iPhone 7, and would severely impede their ability to deal with this quickly and decisively, the two things needed to restore confidence. If they did what you wanted, then instead we would be in a situation where Samsung doesn't look responsible and is being forced by a national authority because they can't sort it out themselves, and there would be long delays which would make it seem even worse.
    ajb1965 likes this.
    09-05-2016 01:28 PM
  5. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    Of course we can disagree and I respect your opinion. However,
    Samsung has already lost some standing in Consumer Reports eyes by not reporting the recall to the CPSC. Consumer Reports is a non for profit independent consumer advocate. Their criticism of the way Samsung is handling the recall can mean a lot to their readers, who don't necessarily own a Samsung product, like most of us do. Samsung's image with CRs readership, many potentially new customers, will be more adversely effected than with the people on this forum who are loyal Samsung owners.

    The fear of slowing down the exchange is understandable. At the same time, if Samsung cranks out the replacements too quickly, and there are problems with these, what has been gained? Hopefully, the CPSC will insure it is done right, not that I am worried Samsung can't do it without them.

    Besides complying with the law by reporting to the CPSC, Samsung's reputation with the general public, not just us here on AC, stands more to gain than lose at this point, I think.
    Consumer Reports, doubt Samsung cares at this point.

    Not doing a government recall is no reason for Consumer Reports to trash Samsung. Ignoring a known problem however, I'd and Samsung did the opposite.

    Since when is government intervention the answer to a problem? Government intervention should be there when needed, not the first thing.
    cardboard60 likes this.
    09-05-2016 01:32 PM
  6. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    They replacements aren't being done too quickly.

    Apple makes 500K iPhones a day.

    4 days to make 2 million.
    09-05-2016 01:33 PM
  7. toenail_flicker's Avatar
    There's got to be a happy medium here. Doesn't have to be one extreme or the other.
    Agreed. Don't know what it is beyond the previous style for me. I don't want aluminum or glass. If you have another option I am open to it. I just use my case and don't look at it.
    Law2138 likes this.
    09-05-2016 01:33 PM
  8. toenail_flicker's Avatar
    Still, I would rather own a Note.
    Exactly. It changed the way I work and made it more seamless.
    09-05-2016 01:34 PM
  9. Baby_Doc's Avatar

    What warning do you need? You take a chance every time you use your phone. We shouldn't need some agency telling us what to do, we should be able to figure that out.
    What you are saying is true. Many people are against government imposed safety regulations or warnings of any kind. For example, many people are opposed to seat belt laws or texting while driving laws. They just want to take their risks and do their own thing.

    On this forum, I see people who don't want to do the phone exchange, just because they haven't experienced any problem with their N7, yet. Although it is just common sense that tells most of us, if Samsung is issuing a recall on all these phones, there must be some risk if you choose to continue to using the phone. I am not sure if the exchange refusers are missing common sense and need a more explicit warnings and directions from Samsung, or if they are the same people who never wear seat belts and just trust their luck.
    Himanshu_Patel likes this.
    09-05-2016 01:46 PM
  10. Baby_Doc's Avatar
    Cr's readership means nothing in the face of Samsung being imposed by a national authority to recall all of their Galaxy note 7's. It just isn't comparable. Being slowed down by bureaucracy wouldn't help people wanting their devices, and would harm Samsung in the face of the iPhone 7, and would severely impede their ability to deal with this quickly and decisively, the two things needed to restore confidence. If they did what you wanted, then instead we would be in a situation where Samsung doesn't look responsible and is being forced by a national authority because they can't sort it out themselves, and there would be long delays which would make it seem even worse.
    In other words, are you saying that Samsung has a good excuse to be uncompliant with a federal law?

    While I completely understand and agree with your reasoning, I doubt any excuse will fly, should Samsung totally ignore reporting to the CPSC. The recall is in the national news and not just here or in Consumer Reports. So, by now, you would think the CPSC has to know about it. Perhaps in the face of CRs criticism, Samsung will formally report to the CPSC tomorrow after this Labor Day weekend. In any case, I doubt Samsung will escape the CPSC getting involved, although you could hope. I do understand your point of view, but unless we can change a law, I think we are supposed to adhere to it.
    09-05-2016 02:15 PM
  11. ThrottleJohnny's Avatar
    In other words, are you saying that Samsung has a good excuse to be uncompliant with a federal law?

    While I completely understand and agree with your reasoning, I doubt any excuse will fly, should Samsung totally ignore reporting to the CPSC. The recall is in the national news and not just here or in Consumer Reports. So, by now, you would think the CPSC has to know about it. Perhaps in the face of CRs criticism, Samsung will formally report to the CPSC tomorrow after this Labor Day weekend. In any case, I doubt Samsung will escape the CPSC getting involved, although you could hope. I do understand your point of view, but unless we can change a law, we are supposed to adhere to it.
    If true, then this will all iron itself out after the weekend. Either way rest assured that Samsung will take care of Samsung, which includes taking care of their customers.

    They have more lawyers and specialists at there disposal than any of us could know.
    toenail_flicker likes this.
    09-05-2016 02:31 PM
  12. soulsmilen's Avatar
    And why would it take this to restore your confidence?

    This is a voluntary recall, this group is when people do not take care of consumers, like Toyota didn't. This is for when they have to be forced into a recall.

    Exactly what tells you that the government getting involved is going to help things? Samsung is doing the exchange quicker than our government could have done. Now when they exchange is done, then they can issue a recall to stop all sales by individuals.

    If you need the US government to restore your confidence in Samsung, then you won't restore your confidence. Samsung is going above and beyond the US government.
    This, for sure. A totally different subject (kind of) , but it is comical that anyone has confidence in a government agency, and would rather them handle anything.

    Also, as Kelly and others have tried to point out numerous times... Voluntary recall and mandatory recall have nothing to do with the consumer and his/her requirements.

    Voluntary - issued by the company of its own volition.

    Mandatory - government agency mandating the company issue a recall, and overseeing it.

    Neither requires the consumer to comply.
    Neither entirely protects the company from possible resulting lawsuit, no matter the time frame of when said suit is filed.

    I don't know about y'all, but if you want and think a mandatory recall is about government officials coming to my house in hazmat suits demanding anything of me, you live in the wrong country. It would not end without bloodshed, I assure you. They can have the phone, that's not the issue. Ok ok I'll stop on this.. sorry, just can't stop laughing at the perception of 'mandatory' in this context.

    Have any of you received a letter about a vehicle recall? Even those regarding safety are voluntary on the consumer end. They don't say anything about anyone 'forcing' you to comply.

    It's a phone battery, for crying out loud; worry about things in life that really matter. This is a blip; an inconvenience, sure, but certainly nothing worth all these panties in wads, and left field 'this is how it should be handled' suggestions. If you want it handled differently, kick butt, work your way into Samsung, and become an exec in a position to make decisions. Until then, be an adult, return or exchange your phone when the new ones are available, and smile.

    It will all be ok, ya know?
    09-05-2016 02:42 PM
  13. 1213 1213's Avatar
    In other words, are you saying that Samsung has a good excuse to be uncompliant with a federal law?

    While I completely understand and agree with your reasoning, I doubt any excuse will fly, should Samsung totally ignore reporting to the CPSC. The recall is in the national news and not just here or in Consumer Reports. So, by now, you would think the CPSC has to know about it. Perhaps in the face of CRs criticism, Samsung will formally report to the CPSC tomorrow after this Labor Day weekend. In any case, I doubt Samsung will escape the CPSC getting involved, although you could hope. I do understand your point of view, but unless we can change a law, I think we are supposed to adhere to it.
    I guess we should end on an agreement.

    If, CPSC steps in, then you would be entirely correct that Samsung should've told them. But in the case that they don't do anything, then Samsung benefits from trying to sort it out before cpsc can respond.

    I guess one debatable aspect, is if Samsung deal with it and CSPC only responds in retrospect but Samsung manages to deal with the issue by then, then Samsung still benefits from doing it the way they did. Because by then I don't think anyone would care what cpsc does, even if Samsung gets fined, if CPSC agrees that the new devices are fine, then nobody would care if Samsung didn't listen.
    09-05-2016 02:45 PM
  14. Aquila's Avatar
    Unless I am mistaken, the N7 forum is for anybody who is considering an N7, which I am. It isn't just a love-in for those who already bought theirs.
    The forum is for anyone who wants to talk about the Note 7, whether that are an owner or not and whether they like it or not. The only requirements are to talk about phones and be nice to people.
    toenail_flicker likes this.
    09-05-2016 03:05 PM
  15. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    What you are saying is true. Many people are against government imposed safety regulations or warnings of any kind. For example, many people are opposed to seat belt laws or texting while driving laws. They just want to take their risks and do their own thing.

    On this forum, I see people who don't want to do the phone exchange, just because they haven't experienced any problem with their N7, yet. Although it is just common sense that tells most of us, if Samsung is issuing a recall on all these phones, there must be some risk if you choose to continue to using the phone. I am not sure if the exchange refusers are missing common sense and need a more explicit warnings and directions from Samsung, or if they are the same people who never wear seat belts and just trust their luck.
    Yeah it is common sense to do these things, but we really can't save people from themselves. In the end, none of us want someone making a decision for us, so.. We all have to make our own decisions.
    09-05-2016 03:24 PM
  16. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    This, for sure. A totally different subject (kind of) , but it is comical that anyone has confidence in a government agency, and would rather them handle anything.

    Also, as Kelly and others have tried to point out numerous times... Voluntary recall and mandatory recall have nothing to do with the consumer and his/her requirements.

    Voluntary - issued by the company of its own volition.

    Mandatory - government agency mandating the company issue a recall, and overseeing it.

    Neither requires the consumer to comply.
    Neither entirely protects the company from possible resulting lawsuit, no matter the time frame of when said suit is filed.

    I don't know about y'all, but if you want and think a mandatory recall is about government officials coming to my house in hazmat suits demanding anything of me, you live in the wrong country. It would not end without bloodshed, I assure you. They can have the phone, that's not the issue. Ok ok I'll stop on this.. sorry, just can't stop laughing at the perception of 'mandatory' in this context.

    Have any of you received a letter about a vehicle recall? Even those regarding safety are voluntary on the consumer end. They don't say anything about anyone 'forcing' you to comply.

    It's a phone battery, for crying out loud; worry about things in life that really matter. This is a blip; an inconvenience, sure, but certainly nothing worth all these panties in wads, and left field 'this is how it should be handled' suggestions. If you want it handled differently, kick butt, work your way into Samsung, and become an exec in a position to make decisions. Until then, be an adult, return or exchange your phone when the new ones are available, and smile.

    It will all be ok, ya know?
    Finally!

    Someone that understands the difference in a voluntary and mandatory recall!

    In Iran and North Korea they may come to your house and force you to comply.

    If someone is reading this forum, they likely aren't in a country that would force citizens to comply with a recall.
    09-05-2016 03:26 PM
  17. Baby_Doc's Avatar
    It is nearly a week since the recall and I haven't heard of a single N7, 2nd edition replacement phone being available. With Sept 30 th as the deadline for some carriers exchange, I am not confident that it will get done in time.

    Any delay is dangerous, because every day there are reports of more phone explosions or fires.

    So why isn't Samsung alerting people to turn off these phones? Isn't Samsungs liability increased by not doing so?

    Could it be that by issuing such a recommendation, which would be the safest thing to do for the customer, Samsung worries people will panic and return their phones for a refund, rather than wait for a replacement N7?

    I hope that isn't Samsung's reasoning, because it would mean Samsung is more interested in limiting their losses than the losses of their customers. But what other explanation could be given?

    Even if you suggest the low risk of fire doesn't justify warning people not to use their phone, wouldn't possibly saving even one life, with such a warning, be worth it? Sure, a lot of people won't listen to warnings anyway. But that's not an excuse either for failing to issue a warning, is it?
    Law2138 likes this.
    09-08-2016 09:03 AM
  18. Law2138's Avatar
    It is nearly a week since the recall and I haven't heard of a single N7, 2nd edition replacement phone being available. With Sept 30 th as the deadline for some carriers exchange, I am not confident that it will get done in time.

    Any delay is dangerous, because every day there are reports of more phone explosions or fires.

    So why isn't Samsung alerting people to turn off these phones? Isn't Samsungs liability increased by not doing so?

    Could it be that by issuing such a recommendation, which would be the safest thing to do for the customer, Samsung worries people will panic and return their phones for a refund, rather than wait for a replacement N7?

    I hope that isn't Samsung's reasoning, because it would mean Samsung is more interested in limiting their losses than the losses of their customers. But what other explanation could be given?

    Even if you suggest the low risk of fire doesn't justify warning people not to use their phone, wouldn't possibly saving even one life, with such a warning, be worth it? Sure, a lot of people won't listen to warnings anyway. But that's not an excuse either for failing to issue a warning, is it?
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I don't think Samsung knows who has the devices unless users register with Samsung or sign into a Samsung account.
    I'd place this more upon the carrier as they can broadcast text messages. Send out annoying weekly reminders if they have to, just keep that thought in the customers mind.

    All over the world, we have people refusing to evacuate before catastrophic storms or weather events. The police can't go door to door and physically remove them from danger. All they can do is warn them.....and then take the risk of rescuing them after areas have been flooded and/or torn apart.
    If someone has it set in their mind that their Note 7 is perfectly fine despite all the warnings, and then they experience damage or injury caused by the device, I would imagine they would have a more difficult time building a case against Samsung or their carrier to get compensated.

    Its like, we warned you X amount of times that this could happen, and you still did not heed the warning.
    Jona005 likes this.
    09-08-2016 09:38 AM
  19. ThrottleJohnny's Avatar
    LOL. There are still people in these very forums still using their Note phones like nothing happened, and the level of awareness can't get any higher than here.

    No sure there is much Samsung can do about that.
    Jona005 likes this.
    09-08-2016 09:49 AM
  20. Climb14er's Avatar
    Finally, if you have yet to purchase the N7, what could Samsung do to encourage you to buy it, given the less than consistent favorable user experience with this phone and possible quality control issues?
    Easy question to answer...

    First of all, cut the price by half... and then I'll be interested.

    Second... come out with a flat screen version, and I'll be more than interested.

    Put the two together, and you've got a buyer right now!
    toenail_flicker likes this.
    09-08-2016 09:53 AM
  21. toenail_flicker's Avatar
    I find the curved edges to be a pita.
    Easy question to answer...

    First of all, cut the price by half... and then I'll be interested.

    Second... come out with a flat screen version, and I'll be more than interested.

    Put the two together, and you've got a buyer right now!
    09-08-2016 09:56 AM
  22. donm527's Avatar
    My buddy/coworker is still using his. our ATT account rep offered him a loaner but he didn't take it. Guess you really never think something will happen to you. And in his defense the recall or rep didn't press any extreme caution to be taken and to not use it. So I guess he hasn't read news articles to show the explosions or read forums like these.

    I'll show him the pick of the burning Jeep

    LOL. There are still people in these very forums still using their Note phones like nothing happened, and the level of awareness can't get any higher than here.

    No sure there is much Samsung can do about that.
    09-08-2016 10:12 AM
  23. Law2138's Avatar
    I find the curved edges to be a pita.
    Agreed. I've never used a device with curved edges, but seeing the complaints about text wrapping combined with frailty, it seems like more of a hassle than a feature.

    Flat screen for sure. The 879 price places it well out of my range until preowned units start popping up on Swappa or Ebay. I can't imagine a Note 8 being in the $900 ballpark.
    09-08-2016 10:17 AM
  24. recDNA's Avatar
    Extended warranty would help. Eliminating lag would help more. Maybe a special deal on next Galaxy with trade it?
    09-08-2016 10:31 AM
  25. Ca_lvn's Avatar
    Samsung gained my confidence by enacting a recall that gives me a new phone with resolved issue.
    I think people like drama today phones and data are very personel and extension of ourself.
    But this hole thing is really getting way overplayed
    09-08-2016 10:36 AM
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