09-07-2016 08:38 PM
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  1. Preach2k's Avatar
    Samsung’s Massive Galaxy Note 7 Recall Brings Battery-Maker Into Focus - WSJ

    From the article (my emphasis in bold):

    Samsung Electronics also relies on another supplier, Hong Kong-based Amperex Technology Ltd., a unit of Japanese electronic parts maker TDK Corp. An Amperex official said Monday (9/5) it only supplied batteries for Galaxy Note 7 phones sold in China. Samsung Electronics went ahead with the launch of the new phones in China on Sept. 1 even as it carried out additional quality tests in South Korea in response to reports of some devices catching fire while charging.
    Roughly 65% of the batteries for the new smartphone were supplied by Samsung SDI, while 35% were made by Amperex Technology, Nomura analyst Chris Chang estimated.

    So, the 'good' batteries seem to have only made it into phones sold in the Chinese domestic market. So even if your phone is marked as made in China, that battery was likely sourced from Samsung SDI, the source of the problem. The '0.1% affected' report came from very early reports before Samsung had a chance to analyze the information and make a determination. When they did discover the root of the problem, it freaked them out enough that they immediately issued a worldwide recall of ALL Note 7s.

    I know you want to think your Note 7 is safe, because you are probably using in, like it, and don't want to go through the trouble of getting it replaced once units are available. I got my wife one myself and I am annoyed that her nice new Note - that I am sure she was going to really enjoy - is now sitting in a box on a shelf while I wait for T-Mobile to get replacements available. The phone on which you might very well be reading this is not safe. It may fail and catch fire no matter how careful you are to charge it or monitor its temperature.
    I posted that article on another Forum. Still no actual proof of it happening here in the United States!
    09-06-2016 08:33 AM
  2. donm527's Avatar
    Remember this phone hasn't been out in the market even a few weeks before blowing up so no one is going to be able to answer that one.

    If you mean Samsung maybe doing long term test have found or finding issues after so many cycles... they are not going to say at this point.

    Is there any reports of batteries failing after a few weeks of charging cycles? Not adding up to have failures after several initial charges. Batteries tend to be very objective with catastrophic failure. A battery is usually good or bad soon after using.
    09-06-2016 08:38 AM
  3. LeoRex's Avatar
    I posted that article on another Forum. Still no actual proof of it happening here in the United States!
    I'll ask you this... if the US models were safe, why would Samsung still recall them all?

    As for proof, well, all we have is limited information from Samsung (excluding anecdotal evidence that we've seen so far). They specifically included the United States as one of the points of origin of some of the failures in recent press releases. We don't know how many, or which model(s), we just know based on this that at least one in the United States has failed.

    The phone you have is not safe and anyone recommending that people keep using one is being extremely irresponsible. If you are willing to take that risk, that's your choice.
    Law2138 likes this.
    09-06-2016 08:46 AM
  4. cardboard60's Avatar
    Ain't it funny that the note 7 that went to china had chineese batteries in them.
    Non or they was recalled.
    Seems the china made batteries was made better.
    Samsung model made in China also got 6 GB ram from what I'm told.
    Think they may of gotten a faster processor also.
    09-06-2016 08:47 AM
  5. rushmore's Avatar
    Remember this phone hasn't been out in the market even a few weeks before blowing up so no one is going to be able to answer that one.

    If you mean Samsung maybe doing long term test have found or finding issues after so many cycles... they are not going to say at this point.
    Referring to the known failures. A battery usually works correctly or not after just a few charge cycles and should not be a case of flaming out after several successful charges that result in the expected capacitance of a 3500 mah battery. A bad battery though would have poor capacitance from the first charge onward- until it either stops charging, or flames out.
    09-06-2016 08:48 AM
  6. Preach2k's Avatar
    I'll ask you this... if the US models were safe, why would Samsung still recall them all?

    As for proof, well, all we have is limited information from Samsung (excluding anecdotal evidence that we've seen so far). They specifically included the United States as one of the points of origin of some of the failures in recent press releases. We don't know how many, or which model(s), we just know based on this that at least one in the United States has failed.

    The phone you have is not safe and anyone recommending that people keep using one is being extremely irresponsible. If you are willing to take that risk, that's your choice.
    To cover all bases. They had to companies making the Batteries. They do not know which battery went where. So the only thing to do in that situation is to REcall all phones. I am giving mine back when the replacement Note 7's come out.
    09-06-2016 08:50 AM
  7. rushmore's Avatar
    To cover all bases. They had to companies making the Batteries. They do not know which battery went where. So the only thing to do in that situation is to REcall all phones. I am giving mine back when the replacement Note 7's come out.

    Same here, but still wondering where the actual failure is, since two places can cause it- based on the heat damage location.
    1. Power bridge module from USB-C port to battery
    2. Battery cell

    If option 1, that could take longer to fail than the battery- ticking boom boom

    If option 2, that would fail almost immediately. This would show either with very low battery life, or the obvious fire issue.
    09-06-2016 08:56 AM
  8. LeoRex's Avatar
    Referring to the known failures. A battery usually works correctly or not after just a few charge cycles and should not be a case of flaming out after several successful charges that result in the expected capacitance of a 3500 mah battery. A bad battery though would have poor capacitance from the first charge onward- until it either stops charging, or flames out.
    Well, we still don't know the specifics of the problem... only Samsung has that info at the moment. And my money is on them not releasing anything about it until they get back a bulk of the Note 7s currently in circulation. The last thing they want is for some bit of information to get out that causes people to incorrectly assume that their phone is safe and that there is no need to return it.

    But you are right, either its the physical chemistry of the battery cell itself, or its a fault in the secondary bits, like the protection circuitry that's built into the pack itself. My money is on the latter based on some info I saw earlier that Samsung made all the actual cells and farmed the pack manufacturing off to partners. But that's still just throwing stuff against the wall....
    scorpiodsu likes this.
    09-06-2016 09:11 AM
  9. scorpiodsu's Avatar
    Referring to the known failures. A battery usually works correctly or not after just a few charge cycles and should not be a case of flaming out after several successful charges that result in the expected capacitance of a 3500 mah battery. A bad battery though would have poor capacitance from the first charge onward- until it either stops charging, or flames out.
    Yeah but no one outside of Samsung has enough specifics about the issue to know if it's some that could go bad any ANY time and not just early. I think it's irresponsible to assume because a battery hasn't gone bad after the first couple charges means it never will when there's not enough information available.
    09-06-2016 09:23 AM
  10. steelers1's Avatar
    I'll ask you this... if the US models were safe, why would Samsung still recall them all?

    As for proof, well, all we have is limited information from Samsung (excluding anecdotal evidence that we've seen so far). They specifically included the United States as one of the points of origin of some of the failures in recent press releases. We don't know how many, or which model(s), we just know based on this that at least one in the United States has failed.

    The phone you have is not safe and anyone recommending that people keep using one is being extremely irresponsible. If you are willing to take that risk, that's your choice.
    I would like to return mine until they get replacements out but I bought mine at Target and they refuse to take it back. So I am being forced to keep using mine or go without a phone.
    09-06-2016 09:28 AM
  11. jsgiv's Avatar
    Yeah but no one outside of Samsung has enough specifics about the issue to know if it's some that could go bad any ANY and not just early. I think it's irresponsible to assume because a battery hasn't gone bad after the first couple charges means it never will when there's not enough information available.
    ^^^^^^^ this ^^^^^^

    The only reason why a company would *ever* initiate a recall (voluntary or otherwise) is because the company has determined that the product is UNSAFE to use.

    Why anyone would choose to use a product that has been deemed unsafe to use astounds me.
    09-06-2016 09:36 AM
  12. scorpiodsu's Avatar
    ^^^^^^^ this ^^^^^^

    The only reason why a company would *ever* initiate a recall (voluntary or otherwise) is because the company has determined that the product is UNSAFE to use.

    Why anyone would choose to use a product that has been deemed unsafe to use astounds me.
    Agree. I get that everyone loves their device and there are some circumstances where it's very inconvenient (corporate store not close, no back up phone, etc....) but I think everyone should return their phone at some point. Making assumptions and saying "mine doesn't have any problems so it must be good" is not good to do when we don't know exactly what the issue is. Defects in products can occur early or later. Depends on the usage as well as what the specific defect is. I just think everyone should return their phones at some point and get a new one. I know some of our carriers or retail stores aren't making it easy but safety is worth the inconvenience. In a few months half the people on this thread will be looking to by the S8 and the other half will be looking at another device in a year anyway lol.
    09-06-2016 09:44 AM
  13. rushmore's Avatar
    Yeah but no one outside of Samsung has enough specifics about the issue to know if it's some that could go bad any ANY time and not just early. I think it's irresponsible to assume because a battery hasn't gone bad after the first couple charges means it never will when there's not enough information available.
    For them to make the decision they did (probably billion dollar plus hit), they must know the actual sample for failures is higher than the apparent 35ish / 2,400,000 scope they stated. My guess is they tested themselves and were absolutely compelled to take the hit. Pummeling is probably a better word, since those kind of dollars are huge even for Samsung.
    09-06-2016 09:55 AM
  14. rushmore's Avatar
    I would like to return mine until they get replacements out but I bought mine at Target and they refuse to take it back. So I am being forced to keep using mine or go without a phone.
    Seems Target might be behind the news and update curve. Phones are a small segment of what they do, so probably a delay in actual publication by Target leadership. Still odd none the less.
    09-06-2016 09:59 AM
  15. anon(782252)'s Avatar
    ^^^^^^^ this ^^^^^^

    The only reason why a company would *ever* initiate a recall (voluntary or otherwise) is because the company has determined that the product is UNSAFE to use.

    Why anyone would choose to use a product that has been deemed unsafe to use astounds me.
    Samsung, by their own official language, does not deem every phone as unsafe. Option 3 of their official US product exchange notification is to exchange the device when new phones become available. Nothing about turning the phone off and not using it and nowhere do they call the device unsafe.

    Risks are taken every single day by over 300 million Americans every time they take a bite of food. There are recalls or product holds at grocery stores every week, sometimes everyday, for food. Food is unsafe, stop eating.

    I'll exchange my phone when T-Mobile has another one for me. Until then, I'll practice my safe charging routine of not charging at night, not fast charging, only charging on non flammable surfaces, and only charging when I can monitor my device.

    Or, if the CPSC decides to step in and make an official statement deeming the device unsafe to use. There is no way that they aren't investigating and are well within their bounds to step in, especially when the product belongs to a foreign company.
    jackash0912 likes this.
    09-06-2016 10:09 AM
  16. steelers1's Avatar
    Seems Target might be behind the news and update curve. Phones are a small segment of what they do, so probably a delay in actual publication by Target leadership. Still odd none the less.
    Behind the news? No it was quite the contrary. He said the recall was last Wednesday and they received an email Wednesday of the recall and to stop selling and send all their stock back to Samsung lol. Anyway he said all exchanges were to be done through Samsung and not where you bought it from. The exact opposite of how it's being done
    09-06-2016 10:37 AM
  17. andrew_ackley's Avatar
    Samsung, by their own official language, does not deem every phone as unsafe. Option 3 of their official US product exchange notification is to exchange the device when new phones become available. Nothing about turning the phone off and not using it and nowhere do they call the device unsafe.

    Risks are taken every single day by over 300 million Americans every time they take a bite of food. There are recalls or product holds at grocery stores every week, sometimes everyday, for food. Food is unsafe, stop eating.

    I'll exchange my phone when T-Mobile has another one for me. Until then, I'll practice my safe charging routine of not charging at night, not fast charging, only charging on non flammable surfaces, and only charging when I can monitor my device.

    Or, if the CPSC decides to step in and make an official statement deeming the device unsafe to use. There is no way that they aren't investigating and are well within their bounds to step in, especially when the product belongs to a foreign company.
    I am a little worried about continuing to use this phone. Don't want to get something different though. I love this phone. Best phone I've ever owned. I'm so torn. I don't want it to catch on fire and mess up my stuff or burn a hole in my leg. I hope the new ones come out soon or I will feel the pressure to get something different. My wife thinks I'm crazy for not just getting an iphone. Blah. What she doesn't understand is that I am stuck with whatever phone I get for the forseeable future. At least a year. I just want the phone I want you know? I'm definitely not letting my kids play with it anymore. (They love drawing funny faces on pictures) but I couldn't live with myself if the phone decided to blow up while they were holding it. No chance I'm letting that happen.
    Jona005 likes this.
    09-06-2016 10:39 AM
  18. dsrules's Avatar
    Good phone. Little expensive, but good (in my opinion).
    09-06-2016 11:03 AM
  19. rushmore's Avatar
    Behind the news? No it was quite the contrary. He said the recall was last Wednesday and they received an email Wednesday of the recall and to stop selling and send all their stock back to Samsung lol. Anyway he said all exchanges were to be done through Samsung and not where you bought it from. The exact opposite of how it's being done
    I thought you meant you literally could not return it at all. Still lame, none the less how Target is managing this. They want to bait people to come into their stores, but not support them after sales. That is unless Samsung directed them to do this.
    09-06-2016 11:36 AM
  20. Jona005's Avatar
    I am a little worried about continuing to use this phone. Don't want to get something different though. I love this phone. Best phone I've ever owned. I'm so torn. I don't want it to catch on fire and mess up my stuff or burn a hole in my leg. I hope the new ones come out soon or I will feel the pressure to get something different. My wife thinks I'm crazy for not just getting an iphone. Blah. What she doesn't understand is that I am stuck with whatever phone I get for the forseeable future. At least a year. I just want the phone I want you know? I'm definitely not letting my kids play with it anymore. (They love drawing funny faces on pictures) but I couldn't live with myself if the phone decided to blow up while they were holding it. No chance I'm letting that happen.
    In a mostly uncertain world, I'll take what certainty and safeguards that I can.
    09-06-2016 11:36 AM
  21. steelers1's Avatar
    I thought you meant you literally could not return it at all. Still lame, none the less how Target is managing this. They want to bait people to come into their stores, but not support them after sales. That is unless Samsung directed them to do this.
    I pretty much can't return it. Samsung says the exchange is to go through Target. Target is saying the opposite so I'm kinda stuck.
    09-06-2016 11:43 AM
  22. Law2138's Avatar
    I pretty much can't return it. Samsung says the exchange is to go through Target. Target is saying the opposite so I'm kinda stuck.
    Someone said it in another thread I think, but it seems like there is a bottleneck of information at Target or something that's holding up the decision. If Target wants people to buy mobile phones at their stores, they'll fall in line to what the competitors (retail AT&T, Verizon, Sprint, Best Buy, Costco, Sam's and Walmart) are doing.
    Jona005 likes this.
    09-06-2016 01:37 PM
  23. cardboard60's Avatar
    Seems Target might be behind the news and update curve. Phones are a small segment of what they do, so probably a delay in actual publication by Target leadership. Still odd none the less.
    Call your carrier.
    09-06-2016 01:39 PM
  24. Preach2k's Avatar
    Update Local Verizon Store told me September 14th the New Notes will drop! Tried to talk me into getting S7. So Next Wednesday I will be there to exchange for a New Note. I ask him will these be refurbished phones like a Insurance replacement. He said absolutely not because of the recall. It must be New Notes 7's replacing the old.
    09-06-2016 01:40 PM
  25. onthehunt's Avatar
    Seriously, this is the best reason to have removable batteries in phones. It would have cost Samsung a lot less and no inconvenience to the consumer to just replace a battery. I've read reports the Note 7 recall will cost Samsung about $1B-$5B dollars! OUCH! Hope Samsung changes their design to include removable batteries.
    09-06-2016 01:43 PM
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