09-18-2016 09:46 AM
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  1. spridell's Avatar
    Breaking news US Govt is Officially recalling the Note 7


    That is it they will ALL be banned from every flight.


    https://www.engadget.com/2016/09/09/...source=Twitter
    09-09-2016 03:53 PM
  2. soldier45's Avatar
    Glad I no longer fly then.
    09-09-2016 03:56 PM
  3. Baby_Doc's Avatar
    Breaking news US Govt is Officially recalling the Note 7


    That is it they will ALL be banned from every flight.


    https://www.engadget.com/2016/09/09/...source=Twitter
    Read this article. The CPSC is finally involved. They are recommending people to stop using the N7, while looking at whether a replacement phone is an acceptable remedy or not. (It may not be an acceptable remedy if problems beyond bad cells are found, such as bad protective circuitry that should have detected charging problems with any bad cell.)

    A lot of people may ignore these warnings, not just at their own personal risk, but possibly at the risks to others. Hopefully, they won't.

    If I owned a N7, I would get a refund and use an interim device until this gets settled. I can always buy another N7 down the road when they are proven safe

    Even without this CPSC intervention, Samsung has been slow to get any N7 replacements. So we shouldn't already blame the CPSC for getting involved and slowing things down, further, although that could be the case, regarding replacements.

    However, with the CPSC issuing don't use warnings, hopefully, more people will listen and reports of fires will stop sooner, than without warnings. This may be more important than how quickly people get a new N7, particularly if there isn't time taken to make sure replacements are completely safe.
    monsieurms likes this.
    09-09-2016 05:12 PM
  4. Blues Fan's Avatar
    Read this article. The CPSC is finally involved. They are recommending people to stop using the N7, while looking at whether a replacement phone is an acceptable remedy or not. It may not be an acceptable remedy if problems beyond bad cells are found, such as bad protective circuitry that should have detected sooner charging problems with any bad cell.

    A lot of people may ignore these warnings, not just at their own personal risk, but possibly at the risks to others. Hopefully, they won't.

    If I owned a N7, I would get a refund and use an interim device until this gets settled. I can always buy another N7 down the road when they are proven safe

    Even without this CPSC intervention, Samsung has been slow to get any replacements. So we shouldn't already blame the CPSC for getting involved and slowing things down, further, although that could be the case, regarding replacements.

    However, with them involved and issuing don't use warnings, hopefully, more people will listen and the sooner reports of more fires will stop. This may be more important than how quickly people get a new N7, particularly if there isn't time taken to make sure replacements are completely safe.
    Either this Sunday or next Wed I'll probably return it then. I'm not using it but was hoping to wait to swap it out to make it easier but it sounds like replacement won't be out for awhile now so I'll return it and decide if I want to order a 7 plus.
    09-09-2016 05:15 PM
  5. TwitchyPuppy's Avatar
    Does anyone know if that battery issue also occurs on Canadian Note 7's?
    Because I haven't heard of a single case, here.
    09-09-2016 08:55 PM
  6. Gearswinger's Avatar
    Now it's banned on Delta and Virgin America. Starting tomorrow all Delta flights will have an announcement that you are not allowed to have a Note powered on or charging.
    jabloomf1230 likes this.
    09-09-2016 09:11 PM
  7. jabloomf1230's Avatar
    So the question is when, if ever, will N7 be fully allowed again? My concern is since recall is voluntary, some venues will never lift ban.
    Once the airlines start banning the Note 7, even when the new safe versions are released, how will this policy ever be undone? The two versions are outwardly identical. What, you say you left the little barcode sticker attached? Heck peel it off.
    09-09-2016 09:18 PM
  8. Gearswinger's Avatar
    Once the airlines start banning the Note 7, even when the new safe versions are released, how will this policy ever be undone? The two versions are outwardly identical. What, you say you left the little barcode sticker attached? Heck peel it off.
    It won't be. The FAA is all about risk management and it reduces risk to just say that the Note 7 isn't allowed.
    jabloomf1230 likes this.
    09-09-2016 09:51 PM
  9. rushmore's Avatar
    Now it's banned on Delta and Virgin America. Starting tomorrow all Delta flights will have an announcement that you are not allowed to have a Note powered on or charging.

    So we can take them on the plane, I'm good.

    Once again our all knowing government doing what they do "best".
    09-09-2016 09:57 PM
  10. jabloomf1230's Avatar
    I agree, the Note 7 is toast, so to speak. Samsung might as well rebrand it as a Galaxy Stylus 1, or some other catchy name.
    TwitchyPuppy likes this.
    09-09-2016 09:57 PM
  11. rushmore's Avatar
    I agree, the Note 7 is toast, so to speak. Samsung might as well rebrand it as a Galaxy Stylus 1, or some other catchy name.
    Ditto. Even if the issue is ten time worse than 35, 350 devices is just .0014 of a percent. The problem is once again our media insinuators and instigators did there thang (probably with giddy back channel assistance by Apple). The damage is done and is billions of short and long term impact.

    Samsung would be better served to forget trying to keep devices in two year retirement curves and go back to replaceable batteries. The battery is the main safety threat, so mitigate the recall risk in the future and regain consumer confidence. Fixed batteries might not cut it anymore for Samsung.
    recDNA likes this.
    09-09-2016 10:14 PM
  12. Gearswinger's Avatar
    Time to take off the tinfoil hat. Yes, this is getting press because it's exciting for the news outlets. No, Apple isn't maniacally forcing it into the news. Samsung is the one who noticed the problem and recalled the device, which got the attention of the government. This is caused by Samsung.
    09-09-2016 10:19 PM
  13. Blues Fan's Avatar
    Ditto. Even if the issue is ten time worse than 35, 350 devices is just .0014 of a percent. The problem is once again our media insinuators and instigators did there thang (probably with giddy back channel assistance by Apple). The damage is done and is billions of short and long term impact.

    Samsung would be better served to forget trying to keep devices in two year retirement curves and go back to replaceable batteries. The battery is the main safety threat, so mitigate the recall risk in the future and regain consumer confidence. Fixed batteries might not cut it anymore for Samsung.
    So you think the Note 7 is in the crapper now and even with revised units it still will have stigma and resale hit? I wonder how the sales will be overall of the Note 7 now. Will it be one of the most popular phones still?
    09-09-2016 10:20 PM
  14. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    I figure every adult going thru TSA probably has a phone on them and on top of mine never being checked, never has anyone I've traveled with or the people in front of me that I usually watch. This covers about 10 different airports. The TSA ineptitude must be widespread if they are supposed to check every single one.
    That is very unusual. I don't know of anyone that hasn't had their phones checked. Also between about April through June, I was flying 5-7 days each week and sometimes going to two and three different states in one day.. I probably went to at least 50 different airports and at least 25 different states and everyone had to show their phones worked. That included our group and people not traveling with us. I was also traveling with some known people in government and some not known and we were still checked.

    They have been doing that with all electronics for a few years now as part of DHS's enhanced security. Not sure when it started.. Here is an article I found with a Google search and this is a little over two years old. Since that time it has increased to more than just random people picked for extra screening and is happening more than just specific busy airports that tend to have more people coming and going all over the world. People have not been able to take their phones on the plane when found to have dead batteries.

    http://www.forbes.com/sites/marcwebe.../#25727815508d

    Now many TSA agents at many airports fail the internal secret tearing that TSA does across the country. TSA does dry run testing on secret to see if agents will catch things or check things that have become known risks or known things that were tried by actual terrorists and they were caught or succeeded in attacking. TSA is notorious for letting known security alerts get passed and focus on baby diapers, mom carrying pumped breast milk that is presented exactly the way the DHS requires it to be or using enhanced security searches on an 80 year old person and ignoring the people that are metaphorically wearing a t-shirt that says "I love Al-Qadea, Death to America, I am a terrorist and will blow up this plane" as they go through security. That is one of the problems with TSA taking over airport security from the FAA after 9/11.

    TSA was failing over 95% of the security tests across the nation and just one year ago after some big shakeups at TSA due to the failures, they had not improved. A really important snippet from the article last year, about those failures:

    "An internal investigation of the Transportation Security Administration revealed security failures at dozens of the nation’s busiest airports, where undercover investigators were able to smuggle mock explosives or banned weapons through checkpoints in 95 percent of trials, ABC News has learned.

    The series of tests were conducted by Homeland Security Red Teams who pose as passengers, setting out to beat the system.

    According to officials briefed on the results of a recent Homeland Security Inspector General’s report, TSA agents failed 67 out of 70 tests, with Red Team members repeatedly able to get potential weapons through checkpoints."

    http://townhall.com/tipsheet/katiepa...ribly-n2075370

    It isn't really surprising you haven't experience them checking electronics because they fail almost every secret test, but they are supposed to be checking electronics, especially phones and laptops since it is policy of DHS to check this. The fact that you and others aren't seeing this done is exactly why TSA is failing these tests and proof that airplanes have bigger issues, much bigger issues than Note 7's that haven't been exchanged, that they need desperately to be concentrating on.
    09-10-2016 12:20 AM
  15. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    Breaking news US Govt is Officially recalling the Note 7


    That is it they will ALL be banned from every flight.


    https://www.engadget.com/2016/09/09/...source=Twitter
    If they are doing an official recall, there is nothing to suggest the corrected ones will be banned nor that the ban will be permanent. Once they are satisfied the issue has been resolved and they can identify corrected vs those under recall, there won't be any reason to have a ban on the new ones. Right now the only safe ones out there are in China, so a ban right now would be expected. The problem ones haven't been replaced yet. There are no recalled ones replaced by "safe ones" yet, so I would expect a temporary ban.
    09-10-2016 12:25 AM
  16. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    Read this article. The CPSC is finally involved. They are recommending people to stop using the N7, while looking at whether a replacement phone is an acceptable remedy or not. (It may not be an acceptable remedy if problems beyond bad cells are found, such as bad protective circuitry that should have detected charging problems with any bad cell.)

    A lot of people may ignore these warnings, not just at their own personal risk, but possibly at the risks to others. Hopefully, they won't.

    If I owned a N7, I would get a refund and use an interim device until this gets settled. I can always buy another N7 down the road when they are proven safe

    Even without this CPSC intervention, Samsung has been slow to get any N7 replacements. So we shouldn't already blame the CPSC for getting involved and slowing things down, further, although that could be the case, regarding replacements.

    However, with the CPSC issuing don't use warnings, hopefully, more people will listen and reports of fires will stop sooner, than without warnings. This may be more important than how quickly people get a new N7, particularly if there isn't time taken to make sure replacements are completely safe.
    So.. advanced warning, this is going to be long.

    A replacement phone is acceptable. Why would it not be? Samsung has identified the problem and is correcting it. There is no way that Samsung didn't identify the problem, initiate and recall and a plan to replace them all, without identitying the problem.

    Circuitry or bad cells, doesn't matter, the issue is still in the battery, whether it is the circuitry in the actual battery or just bad cells. Samsung identified the problem, very doubtful Samsung is going to tell the exact details, but that isn't really necessary to identify and correct the problem.

    Again, looking at this logically and from just a business standpoint, there is no way that Samsung exposed the problem, did a voluntary recall, and didn't identify the exact issue, correct it and then rush it. They have been looking at this long before the recall was announced. It wouldn't make business sense at all for Samsung to do all that and then replace bad phones with phones that they were not positive, corrected the problem and were safe. That would be corporate suicide. Samsung isn't going to risk that on the Note 7 line. While Samsung sells a lot of phones, Samsung Mobile is a tiny drop in a very big bucket of the business that is Samsung. No way Samsung Global would risk all of Samsung over the projected 12-14 million Note 7's that Samsung Mobile expected to sell this year. They wouldn't risk their reputation, the wouldn't risk lawsuits over putting out corrected phones that weren't actually corrected. I seriously doubt that Samsung's insurance company and Samsung Global would let the tiny division of Samsung Mobile, risk the entire company by sending out phones as replacements that haven't completely identified and corrected the problem.

    It seems from previous postings of yours that you think CPSC is not only needed to ensure that the replacement phones are safe, but that they actually know more about the issues that are a problem and how to correct them. Samsung wouldn't be making replacements that they know aren't safe. I have yet to see a rush where this is concerned. What we found out last Friday is that Samsung has been looking into this longer than they even publicly said, before the recall.

    Also one reason that CPSC wanted to be involved is because they said they wanted to ensure exchanges were done quickly. They said they could ensure they were done quicker than Samsung could. I trust Samsung to figure out the problem, correct it completely and exchange quicker than I trust CPSC. CPSC isn't necessary to ensure all recalls are done quickly and correctly. In fact, CPSC is needed when a company ignores an issue and doesn't do a recall. When a company does a voluntary recall and replaces all of a product, CPSC isn't really needed. CPSC involved doesn't mean that ensures that it will be correct. CPSC is needed for things like the the Takata airbag issue. The reason CPSC was needed is because that company was not doing a voluntary recall and making sure the problem was corrected. CPSC was necessary to force the company to correct their issue. No one had to force Samsung. In fact if Samsung ignored the issue and waited until the government required a recall, it would be much longer and many more cases of it happening or after several deaths and/or serious injury.

    The Takata airbag problems started about 10 years before the recall was done. There have been 13 deaths worldwide specifically due to the airbags, and over 100 injuries. Congress was calling for criminal charges against Takata and there were at least 8 deaths and 100 injuries and 10 years before a recall was forced. The government did not do what they should have done and initiated a recall when Takata ignored the issue.

    Now Samsung has done just the opposite of Takata, they didn't ignore the exploding phones, they investigated it quickly and did a voluntary recall and there were no deaths or injuries. The government is needed when a company ignores and issue and doesn't correct it, which is not at all what Samsung is doing. Seems to me if Takata did what Samsung did, there would be less death and injury and it would have been handled much quicker. The government didn't act, they didn't step in when they should have, in fact they contributed to deaths and injuries by not requiring a company to do a recall years ago when the company ignored the problem.

    So which recall is better and safer? A recall a company quickly identifies the problem, takes responsibility, does a voluntary recall and does it very quickly, even before there are any deaths, much less injuries.. Or the government waiting 10 years, several deaths, hundreds of injuries, before they force a recall? I can't figure out why you seem to think the government being involved is necessary or will ensure things are done quickly and done when and how they should be? I trust a company more that sees an issue and immediately decides they need to do a recall, fixes the problem and replace the problem product and they aren't forced to do it, more than I trust a government required recall that the government itself ignored for years and through many deaths and injuries.

    We don't see a ton of voluntary recalls and that isn't because the government is watching over us and making sure everything is safe. The reason we don't see a lot of voluntary recalls is because many companies won't admit there is a problem without being made to, and then very quickly correct the problem and make sure the unsafe product is off the market.

    I work for the government on a local and state level and I deal with the federal government also a lot with my job. I can assure you, the government being involved in something does not ensure that something is done quickly and correctly. Generally the more the government is involved in anything, the worse it ends up being. Many times if the government is riding in to save the day, you might want to run the other way and ask them to please not save you.

    Now this isn't "political" saying this about the government, but just what happens with recalls and other things the government gets involved in. It is similar to the difference in a person that does something wrong and no one knows, but they determine the right thing to do is admit what they did, take responsibility for it, and correct it versus someone that knows they did something wrong and they keep it to themselves, cover it up, do nothing to correct it or stop it in the future. Then eventually this person is caught and exposed, they then admit the issue, the person that exposed them ignored the issue when it was happening for a long time, the guilty person only takes responsibility for it because they have been exposed and are forced to do so and never would have admitted it and corrected it, if they were never caught.

    Which one would you consider more trustworthy and would you trust to actually take care of the problem? Myself, I would trust the first person, because they weren't forced, they could have kept quiet and done nothing if and until they were found out and forced. Samsung and companies that do voluntary recalls fall into the category of the "first person" and Takata falls into the category of the "second person" and the government is the person that ignored the issue and finally exposed the second person. Samsung did the right thing and did it quickly and very few companies will do that and very few, if any, government recalls are handled this quickly. I just don't understand why you seem to think the government is necessary to make sure it is done correctly and quickly, over a company that makes their own issue public and corrects it. What Samsung has done is how every company should handle a recall in a perfect world. The one thing that is good that can come from the government involved, is that Samsung will have to handle the phones that were bought from individuals, bought online at places like Swappa and eBay, or people that traded devices with individuals. As of right now, Samsung isn't handling those phones, but I would guess they have a plan for that maybe after the exchanges are done for people that bought from them, carriers and retail stores. Samsung very obviously wants all bad phones off the market so there is no question if someone has a Note 7 before the corrected ones and if it is safe. This will also stop anyone from selling a pre-recorded Note 7, at least in the USA, because selling the defective phone will be illegal. But again, Samsung could have already had a plan in place to make sure the phones that were defective, be unusable and no one would buy it anyway. We don't know if Samsung had a plan in place to deal with those two issues, but I can't imagine them doing a worldwide recall voluntarily, replacing the phones and not making sure those issues were addressed. So the government being involved isn't even necessary for those issues at this point, Samsung could have also handled those issues. It wouldn't even make business sense to do all this recall, considering the financial hit and PR hit that Samsung is taking and them not to address those two issues at some point. It might be the only two things the government will be "forcing" Samsung to do, and they possibly were already going to address and take care of. Samsung didn't even have to approach CPSC today and agree to work with them. They could have waited until our government forced the official recall. Even the South Korean government isn't forcing a recall. While Samsung hasn't done everything perfect with this at this point, this is an unprecedented event in the phone industry, they have no previous experience to draw upon, but they are handling this in an extremely professional and correct manner and NO ONE made them do that. They did it on their own and a company doing this is also unprecedented. Thinking the government being involved means it is being handled the best way and the safest is like thinking our airports are safer because TSA is there. In fact our airports are really less safe. Many people think that TSA ensures our airports are safe so now there is a false sense of security on flights. Now that many think TSA makes the airports more safe, the general public tends to ignore red flags they see by some passengers. They have the view of "well TSA wasn't concerned about them, they got through security so they must be safe and I am overreacting". Then they don't report the issue to anyone and behind the scenes TSA is failing 95% of the tests that are supposed to stop these red flag people. That false sense of security and TSA failures is exactly what makes our airports less safe than pre 9/11. The government handling a recall can be that same false sense of security, especially when the company is like the public was right after 9/11 with the "see something, say something" attitude. The "see something say something" attitude of the public makes our airports much safer than the false sense of security that TSA gives. In many cases a false sense of security is much more dangerous than something that is actually dangerous. I think CPSC getting involved is wrong to do here, very wrong, unnecessary and likely to discourage companies to do a voluntary recall in the future.

    The one thing that a forced recall accomplishes that a voluntary recall never does, is the ability to force huge fines on the company. Quite a thing to do.. Force large fines on a company that was going way above and beyond any government forced recall, they were even supplying loaner phones, giving out gifts for the inconvenience, stopping future releases that will make them money and replacing phones on the market first. They could have kept on with their releases and worked on the exchange program all while taking many of the corrected phones and still doing releases so they could make money also.
    09-10-2016 02:34 AM
  17. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    Either this Sunday or next Wed I'll probably return it then. I'm not using it but was hoping to wait to swap it out to make it easier but it sounds like replacement won't be out for awhile now so I'll return it and decide if I want to order a 7 plus.
    If you plan to get the new Note 7, the least difficult way is to hold on to the phone until yours comes in and do the exchange instead of doing the refund and repurchase.
    09-10-2016 02:36 AM
  18. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    Does anyone know if that battery issue also occurs on Canadian Note 7's?
    Because I haven't heard of a single case, here.
    Every Note 7 except the ones related in China in the day of the recall it the day before, are affected.
    TwitchyPuppy likes this.
    09-10-2016 02:36 AM
  19. Kelly Kearns's Avatar
    It won't be. The FAA is all about risk management and it reduces risk to just say that the Note 7 isn't allowed.
    Well that isn't necessarily true. There are things that can be done to make sure the old ones don't work. Also last I heard, after the recall Samsung is going to be supplying a list of the recalled phones by IMEI and they can be checked by that.

    No phone is guaranteed not to catch on fire. Phone fires happen all the time, with every brand and model. Recently an iPhone caught on fire midflight and while being used, they said nothing about it charging. They can't tell which iPhones or any other phone will do that and they aren't banned. Also lithium batteries can easily catch on fire on planes and have. Again no guarantee a phone without a known issue isn't going to explode.
    09-10-2016 02:42 AM
  20. recDNA's Avatar
    Time to take off the tinfoil hat. Yes, this is getting press because it's exciting for the news outlets. No, Apple isn't maniacally forcing it into the news. Samsung is the one who noticed the problem and recalled the device, which got the attention of the government. This is caused by Samsung.
    Well Apple did nudge it that way when Apple announced they will no longer use Samsung batteries.

    As for waiting for exchange? I was delighted to return mine for cash back. Samsung says not to charge nor turn on so why keep it? You can still buy another one IF you really want to and get 2 weeks to return it again. I fear these phones are stigmatized. Once repaired and fully safe some will still ask you not to charge in their car or home whatever. By the time all the airlines have banned them who knows how long before they are allowed to be turned on or charged again? I DO want to charge and use my phone on a plane.
    09-10-2016 07:29 AM
  21. jabloomf1230's Avatar
    I wonder how many companies are working feverishly on viable alternatives to the Hindenburg lithium batteries? Everyone once thought that Teflon was great too.
    09-10-2016 07:51 AM
  22. monsieurms's Avatar
    They aren't going back to a removable battery....
    Sure, that's exactly what everyone was saying with the SD card slots, too. Never coming back. Obsolete. Better get used to it. This is the new way now. Oh well.One year later...they're back.

    Things run in cycles. People change their minds. Absolutist comments are always proven wrong--because there are no absolutes in life and someone is always marching to the beat of a different drummer. This might indeed be the type of things that brings removable batteries back on the radar. How much easier is it to just recall the battery--and not the phone? That monetary loss is contained.

    I don't want to get political, either--and your long post certainly seemed to me to have a fair share of that--but I certainly hope the government DOES get involved. It is a textbook example of a need for an independent body not concerned about profit. Nothing is perfect in any way or shape or form, but merely relying on Samsung--as it begins to experience that "heartbreaking" monetary loss that its executives spoke of--to continue to do the right thing is naive. They might.

    They might not. If discontented shareholders start threatening management, might there be a course correction? If the losses mount, might some corners be cut? If employees starts getting laid off, will the original idealism fade? Might the original impulse to do right change to self-preservation? "Oh, well, we recalled enough so it is probably ok now and with luck it won't kill anyone. It will be cheaper to defend those lawsuits and pay them off." We've seen corporate cover up stuff like that before, so many times, haven't we? http://www.nytimes.com/2000/08/23/bu...o-defects.html

    It needs to be required, because it affects OTHER people. If my neighbor's apartment catches on fire, it affects me. They are living in an apartment complex, not a desert island.


    Once again our all knowing government doing what they do "best".
    Really--we're talking about planes catching fire and perhaps crashing. Isn't that a legitimate concern? Of course, the govt is not all knowing. And neither...is...Samsung (you know, the company that just had to recall the Note 7!)....and neither are individual users...
    jj2339 and TwitchyPuppy like this.
    09-10-2016 07:54 AM
  23. monsieurms's Avatar
    I figure every adult going thru TSA probably has a phone on them and on top of mine never being checked, never has anyone I've traveled with or the people in front of me that I usually watch. This covers about 10 different airports. The TSA ineptitude must be widespread if they are supposed to check every single one.
    The power up thing is occasionally with laptops. Even there, they rarely bother to actually demand a power up, which evidently is not mandatory. On phones, I have never once seen a TSA agent ask for a phone to be powered up, not mine or anyone else's, and I travel constantly and always with phones, laptops and tablets. I will visit or have visited 5 countries this year on different trips. That's normal for me. I'm on planes ALL the time.
    09-10-2016 09:11 AM
  24. CincyGuy's Avatar
    I fly 3 to 6 times per year, delta, United, Southwest. Never ever have been asked to power up a phone. Now they are always on when they go through the scanner, so there is that. I can't recall ever seeing anyone asked to power theirs up either.
    09-10-2016 03:15 PM
  25. dvarapala's Avatar
    Wife is flying on American this afternoon. She just texted me that there was an announcement specifically regarding the Note 7 telling passengers to power them off.
    rushmore likes this.
    09-11-2016 05:05 PM
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