View Poll Results: Are you handing your phone in

Voters
70. You may not vote on this poll
  • Already handed it over.

    23 32.86%
  • Probably going to hand it in.

    28 40.00%
  • Na, she'll be right mate.

    19 27.14%
09-15-2016 03:40 PM
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  1. JoBudden's Avatar
    Exactly my point. I love the Note series but it is extremely similar. I've been using it and the only difference I see is no SPen but it is 80-90% the same device.
    .5 more inches of screen also lol
    jayp1306 likes this.
    09-12-2016 12:32 AM
  2. jayp1306's Avatar
    I just want a timeline, like everyone else. Can I go to iPhone 7 and wait for the note? On big red, they're doing the double exchange
    09-12-2016 12:37 AM
  3. Blues Fan's Avatar
    Absolutely. We'll all have decisions to make once we get the final word on the process, and it sucks whatever the outcome. I don't want to wait for the next version, but if this takes a couple months or so, I will likely wait and hope it is not delayed in 2017 from this mess. That makes me very sad.
    Someone else in another thread was in BB too and said they had them locked up and the sales guy said they think Wed they will be able to start swapping them. I hope when I come home from work tomorrow I get on the computer and see they have been approved.
    09-12-2016 12:44 AM
  4. smooth4lyfe's Avatar
    The U.S. CPSC points to recent reports of Note 7 phones catching fire “while charging and during normal use,” and so the agency says that owners should power down their phones. The CPSC says that it’s working with Samsung to announce a formal recall of the Note 7

    U.S. CPSC urges consumers to stop using Note 7 as it works with Samsung on formal recall - TmoNews
    During normal use too? Geesh its like a ticking time bomb
    09-12-2016 01:11 AM
  5. Strong_Genetics's Avatar
    Fresh week about to start hopefully we get some answers this week ..good or bad I need something
    09-12-2016 01:15 AM
  6. turb0wned's Avatar
    My best buy in Hawaii has the new ones in the back, had them since Friday. My buddy is a supervisor there and told me when I went to turn in my Note. I asked him to go look in the back and tell me how the box looked like compared to the last one. He came back and said it has squares on it.
    09-12-2016 03:03 AM
  7. jgraves1107's Avatar
    Based to some degree on the worry for using the Note 7, we should also perhaps pursue banning fireworks, since exponentially more people (especially under 21) have been injured or worse through the years. Okay, some were when drunk, but still the point is there are things with a bigger chance to hurt or kill that people approach daily as "meh" until something happens.

    I keep hearing about issues happening "daily" and piling up by some posters and the media, yet the same garage and Jeep events are recycled as new, but people just now finding out. The terrible event with the 6 year old is new, but even that has respectfully yet to be verified. People even stating it was not charging while being used , but says nothing about that in the article.

    All things presumed constant, anode / cathode layer breaches do not normally behave in a ticking bomb manner after initial charges and use. If it is something else beyond that and Samsung is not forthright, kiss the Note 7 (at least) goodbye. Too much attention, especially if/when the three incidents above are verified as legit concerning the Note 7.

    The only thing I can think of that would cause a breach after initial charges and use is if a sharp object penetrates the cell and creates anode / cathode contact (a breach). If a layer insulation defect, the energy for an explosive like failure is not normally going to lay dormant for days and weeks of use and then suddenly, kapow!

    It would be interesting to see the CPSC's findings, but that would also mean they took the time to visit, audit, interview and test the cells. That means weeks before good. None of this will add up if the issue is so grave as the media points out and this is fast tracked. Point here is I would not be surprised if this takes longer than people might expect. Again, if as dire as perceived.
    Well now the circuit that is part of the battery could be the issue.
    09-12-2016 03:52 AM
  8. jgraves1107's Avatar
    That assumes all systems are flawed. I thought it was only some of them, in which case the longer you have your phone the less likely it is to have the flaw, statistically speaking.
    Mine started the battery drop. Went from 76% to 0%. The back got hot and was not charging it. So no I don't think it's wise to keep playing Russian Roulette. If the battery issue is a failing protection circuit on the battery then they may all be defective and fail randomly.
    09-12-2016 03:59 AM
  9. daisyd1224's Avatar
    Samsung threads are amusing. One guy thinks the fearmongers need to stop spreading fear. One guy says to relax and take precautions. One person says why would you let your kid play with a recalled phone but then everybody is saying how safe they think the phone is , so why wouldn't you? I loved the phone but come on people, it's just a phone. It's not worth all this stress. Personally, I'll try again next year with note 8. This just turned into a circus that I'm not interested in. I want to go out and if I need to charge my phone, not worry about it. I want to hand it to my kid to entertain him for 10 minutes while I finish dinner. I want to sleep without fear of what it might do. Good luck to the rest of you. I will be a note 8 fan for sure but I will never get a phone the day of release again.
    soulsmilen and drusum like this.
    09-12-2016 04:03 AM
  10. donm527's Avatar
    09-12-2016 04:51 AM
  11. TechnologyTwitt's Avatar
    Call me cynical -- this incident is an opportunity to cash in on the "hysteria".

    Recalled Samsung phone explodes in little boy’s hands | New York Post

    The frustrating thing is how impossible it has been for Samsung to send *one* message through all of its retail channels. There are posts everywhere where people are told to take their phones home until the new ones come in, or stores jerking people around on return policies, or lying, or ignorant. Who knows what or how many stories the owner of this phone was told or if they ever even received the "turn off your phone and wait until some future date when you might get a replacement" message from Samsung.
    09-12-2016 05:10 AM
  12. TechnologyTwitt's Avatar
    OK you do realize that people will do ANYTHING, including put their child in danger, to make a fast buck off a very few isolated incidents that are being overly exaggerated?

    OK. You do realize that you're making mockery of a child being hurt. Regardless who or what is at fault. It's a child.
    dadsterflip and rushmore like this.
    09-12-2016 05:25 AM
  13. TechnologyTwitt's Avatar
    Fear Mongering: the action of deliberately arousing public fear or alarm about a particular issue

    You: "it simply does not make a difference if an incident is confirmed and unconfirmed."

    The media (especially now social media) THRIVES off the unconfirmed, because people like yourself take everything as truth. Here's a link that may help you....Feeling afraid all the time – anxietycentre.com


    Nothing I said was fear mongering. How a person perceives something in print is their own deal, not mine. Fact - "defective battery". Stating that people need to be responsible is not fear mongering, it just is.

    Incorrect statement. LOL That is comical considering people are suggesting and encouraging *safer* charge options. That's about as incorrect as it can be.

    Understanding how a battery works and what makes it ignite makes the charging theories hogwash. That's it. There is nothing to figure out.

    Again, you missed the point entirely. Because it's the battery, it simply does not make a difference if an incident is confirmed and unconfirmed.
    09-12-2016 05:39 AM
  14. smoothrunnings's Avatar
    This is what could happen if you charge your Samsung Note 7.



    The owner says Samsung has been giving him the run around, yet Samsung says they are working him to assist him any way...sounds like BS to me Samsung!
    09-12-2016 05:47 AM
  15. hailsusy90's Avatar
    .5 more inches of screen also lol
    The Edge has 5.5 and the Note is 5.7. More like .2 so to me it's no big deal. Everyone else has a right to what they're comfortable with though.
    09-12-2016 06:12 AM
  16. bohwat's Avatar
    this could be another idea for WMD movie
    09-12-2016 06:48 AM
  17. jabloomf1230's Avatar
    That assumes all systems are flawed. I thought it was only some of them, in which case the longer you have your phone the less likely it is to have the flaw, statistically speaking.
    I don't see how Samsung would know this without further, detailed investigation. All that they have said publicly is that the Note 7 batteries manufacturered by Samsung SDI have a flaw. In any case a device should be designed to fail safe. Lithium batteries are presently designed such that if they do fail, bad things happen.

    Also, I expect that people are going to say that www.glassdoor.com is just a forum for disgruntled employees but look at these comments from SDI employees :

    https://www.glassdoor.com/Reviews/Sa...ews-E40761.htm
    09-12-2016 06:50 AM
  18. Aquila's Avatar
    The 24 or 35 or 2400 or whatever numbers are a distraction. Some people seem to be thinking of those as the only ones that were flawed. Not accurate. 100% of the batteries made with the intention of being sold anywhere but China have the flaw. A small percentage of those have presented symptoms and a small percentage of those have presented symptoms catastrophically. So whether you believe that there are 400,000 phones in the wild or 2,400,000 or any number in between - that's the actual number of devices that are corrupted and thus are dangerous. There are also zero external indicators on the device (such as where it was assembled, which SKU, etc) that would make one unit safe while another one was not - because there are exactly zero safe devices that have been released to consumers.

    It sounds like there have been devices with this flaw corrected that have been shipped to retailers for exchange. Those ones would be a totally new population and have no impact on the figures above.

    Unless you have one of those new devices, which you do not - your Note 7 does have the flaw and even if it hasn't presented symptoms yet, it can do so at any time. There are no correlated patterns of usage among the devices that have catastrophically presented nor even any patterns among those that displayed symptoms other than combustion. This means that there are no presumably safe usage patterns that you can adopt in order to mitigate the risk of your device presenting symptoms except for following the recommendations of the safety experts - which were "turn it off and don't charge it".

    TLDR version: 100% of pre-recall* Note 7 devices are defective and there are zero safe ways to use any of them other than to powering it off and keeping it off the charger.

    *Obviously the ones made in China with batteries made in China for sale only within China are not impacted. Which does not include the T-Mobile ones that were made in China but instead use the defective batteries made for sale in all markets that are not China.
    09-12-2016 07:18 AM
  19. rtwright68's Avatar
    I don't see how Samsung would know this without further, detailed investigation. All that they have said publicly is that the Note 7 batteries manufacturered by Samsung SDI have a flaw. In any case a device should be designed to fail safe. Lithium batteries are presently designed such that if they do fail, bad things happen.

    Also, I expect that people are going to say that www.glassdoor.com is just a forum for disgruntled employees but look at these comments from SDI employees :

    https://www.glassdoor.com/Reviews/Sa...ews-E40761.htm
    Sounds like SDI is more worried about "TPS Reports" than making batteries that don't explode...

    "Too much time was devoted to prepare paper works and reports to the management. "
    09-12-2016 07:22 AM
  20. AdamHLG's Avatar
    I don't keep my phone near gasoline as a general rule, so I think that chance is 0%.
    Firefighter here. I hope this is a joke. Show me an ignition source and I will show you smoke and heat banking down the ceiling of a room and contents in under 3 minutes. No accellerant needed. Then initiate 911 and add 90 seconds to the incident before our station is alerted. Add 3 minutes response time (if youre lucky) and you have extension into the walls and or attic. Yes. Your house can burn down without gasoline.
    09-12-2016 08:03 AM
  21. soulsmilen's Avatar
    Fear Mongering: the action of deliberately arousing public fear or alarm about a particular issue

    You: "it simply does not make a difference if an incident is confirmed and unconfirmed."

    The media (especially now social media) THRIVES off the unconfirmed, because people like yourself take everything as truth. Here's a link that may help you....Feeling afraid all the time – anxietycentre.com
    Considering I stay away from media or articles (even AC's) on this kind of thing, your comment is invalid. Once again, people assume. I haven't read even one article about it, and won't until there is an official reason given, if at all. I don't need any site, tech writer, or Joe Blow telling me what I already know. It doesn't take a rocket scientist to know the media is full of misinformation; one only has to read the forum and all the doom and gloom to see that.

    My comment about it not mattering is in strict reference to the battery/hardware itself being defective. It doesn't make a difference because the potential risk is there whether it be the anode and cathode, the polymer separator, any other component, or something that went wrong with the manufacturing process (clean room not so clean, etc).

    It is what it is. Nothing more, nothing less. Trying to circumvent a potential hazard without knowing exactly what the hazard is is careless and irresponsible. I don't think anyone can argue that, realistically; in and of itself, regardless of reference, it is a true statement.

    I still have my phone, I'm not running around screaming doomsday. But I also didn't risk injury or damage; I shut it down and activated a spare. No harm, no foul, my life is not over, and there was no drama involved other than a tear. 😢 lol

    I knew there would be backlash for saying what I did, but like I said, if it causes even one less injury then all is well.

    I spoke my opinion on advising how to circumvent something that is a relatively unknown fault; and it is relatively unknown since there is no official statement other than to say defective battery. Oh wait.. There is an official statement advising to power it down and not use it now. And still.. people are saying it's not serious. I hope it's not, of course, but ignoring it and assuming it's not justified is foolish. Something people are assuming they know ironically because of forums and the media. People who know absolutely nothing about batteries and how they work are following suit because Joe Blow said it's safe to do so. Who's really acting on unconfirmed information? Not I.

    Be well.
    09-12-2016 08:36 AM
  22. soulsmilen's Avatar
    The 24 or 35 or 2400 or whatever numbers are a distraction. Some people seem to be thinking of those as the only ones that were flawed. Not accurate. 100% of the batteries made with the intention of being sold anywhere but China have the flaw. A small percentage of those have presented symptoms and a small percentage of those have presented symptoms catastrophically. So whether you believe that there are 400,000 phones in the wild or 2,400,000 or any number in between - that's the actual number of devices that are corrupted and thus are dangerous. There are also zero external indicators on the device (such as where it was assembled, which SKU, etc) that would make one unit safe while another one was not - because there are exactly zero safe devices that have been released to consumers.

    It sounds like there have been devices with this flaw corrected that have been shipped to retailers for exchange. Those ones would be a totally new population and have no impact on the figures above.

    Unless you have one of those new devices, which you do not - your Note 7 does have the flaw and even if it hasn't presented symptoms yet, it can do so at any time. There are no correlated patterns of usage among the devices that have catastrophically presented nor even any patterns among those that displayed symptoms other than combustion. This means that there are no presumably safe usage patterns that you can adopt in order to mitigate the risk of your device presenting symptoms except for following the recommendations of the safety experts - which were "turn it off and don't charge it".

    TLDR version: 100% of pre-recall* Note 7 devices are defective and there are zero safe ways to use any of them other than to powering it off and keeping it off the charger.

    *Obviously the ones made in China with batteries made in China for sale only within China are not impacted. Which does not include the T-Mobile ones that were made in China but instead use the defective batteries made for sale in all markets that are not China.

    Brilliant, another voice of reason.
    09-12-2016 08:40 AM
  23. felloffthetruck's Avatar
    This is what could happen if you charge your Samsung Note 7.



    The owner says Samsung has been giving him the run around, yet Samsung says they are working him to assist him any way...sounds like BS to me Samsung!
    and you keep a full 5 gallon gas can in the front seat at the same time. Just saying......
    kabeeo likes this.
    09-12-2016 09:12 AM
  24. fwinst's Avatar
    Firefighter here. I hope this is a joke. Show me an ignition source and I will show you smoke and heat banking down the ceiling of a room and contents in under 3 minutes. No accellerant needed. Then initiate 911 and add 90 seconds to the incident before our station is alerted. Add 3 minutes response time (if youre lucky) and you have extension into the walls and or attic. Yes. Your house can burn down without gasoline.
    AGREED!! Let's also add that lithium-Ion batteries (ALL LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES) are dangerous. If they go up in flames, they have everything they need to burn within the battery. Smothering them DOES NOT work. Throwing water on them can make the situation significantly worse. You need no other ignition source other than the battery itself to create a major issue.
    09-12-2016 09:14 AM
  25. Preach2k's Avatar
    Now an Galaxy S7 Edge Explodes and The Person is suing Samsung!
    https://www.classaction.com/news/exp...ree-burns-man/
    09-12-2016 09:15 AM
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